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Jun 18, 2021 - 4:43:58 PM
1179 posts since 12/2/2013

I've never been able to make a really good stovetop rice dish that doesn't taste (look) like papier mache. I don't have the pots for steaming (nor the space to store them). So who has a good tasting, fool-proof recipe?

Jun 18, 2021 - 4:57:08 PM

dawgdoc

USA

9069 posts since 8/25/2004

1. Buy a rice cooker
2. Two fingers more water than rice
3. Hit ‘on’

I quit trying to cook good rice years ago

(edit: the fun part is tossing in random foods laying around). Veggies etc. instant rice soup too

Edited by - dawgdoc on 06/18/2021 17:00:35

Jun 18, 2021 - 5:51:58 PM

Owen

Canada

8976 posts since 6/5/2011

.... I've never tasted stove-top rice pudding that wasn't acceptable or better.  Maybe the solution (?) is to forget the other rice "dishes," and concentrate on pudding??   wink

Jun 18, 2021 - 6:39:10 PM
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Brian T

Canada

18357 posts since 6/5/2008

I have and eat 6 kinds of rice. What is your interest? They cook differently.
For the past few years, I've been quite partial to brown Basmati.
Classic fried rice? I'll use a simple long grain white.

I had your problem 30+ years ago.
Fortunately, I had an Asian co-worker educate me to rice.
Been a pleasure to pick and choose every time.

Cooking? Pot with measured rice and water, little salt. Boil then simmer. Done deal.

Jun 18, 2021 - 7:00:24 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

15124 posts since 9/27/2007

Soak some of this https://shop.lundberg.com/products/organic-california-brown-basmati-rice  in some stock or just plain water for at least an hour. Bring to a boil & simmer on low for another hour. Smells like popcorn to me.  Fluff it a few times as it cooks. Add butter. Serve.

Edited to add. Yeah Brian! we both agree on this rice. Way better than potatoes for us type 2's.

Edited by - bubbalouie on 06/18/2021 19:05:39

Jun 18, 2021 - 7:12:11 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

15124 posts since 9/27/2007

I add this to my Hoppin' John recipe! I add a cup to the stew after simmering the smoked pork hock all day.

 

Jun 18, 2021 - 7:58:46 PM
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RB3

USA

1007 posts since 4/12/2004

For Uncle Ben's original white rice this is the process I use for cooking on a stove top.

1. Twice as much water as rice. For example, 1/2 cup of rice with 1 cup of water.
Usually, I substitute chicken stock for the water.
2. Melt a little butter in a pan, add the water and a little salt, and bring the water
to a boil.
3. When it reaches a boil, immediately turn the burner to the lowest heat, add
the rice, stir and put the cover on the pan.
4. Cook the rice at the lowest heat for 25 minutes. Do not remove the cover
during that 25 minute period.

Years ago, I gave banjo lessons to a gourmet chef and he told me that he preferred to bake his rice in a covered, oven proof dish. I tried his method, and found that it also works very well. The ratio of liquid to rice is the same as above. The benefit of baking is that you can vary the time-temperature ratio and get the same results. 30 minutes at 400 deg., 40 minutes at 375 deg., 50 minutes at 350 deg, and 60 minutes at 325 deg. If you're baking another course, you can vary that time-temperature ratio of the rice so that both the rice and the other course finish cooking at the same time.

Jun 18, 2021 - 8:49 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

15124 posts since 9/27/2007

I took over a friends house that was fully equipped. I asked about the rice cooker. It's 2 to one water or stock to rice.  You set it up & you have a big tub of rice. Put it in the fridge & use it for the best fried rice. 

I used to make a lot of Chili. I'd plug in the rice cooker & people would say "Rice & Chili?"

Yes. Rice & chili.

Jun 18, 2021 - 11:52:14 PM

Brian T

Canada

18357 posts since 6/5/2008

Lots of rices are 1C rice and 2C water. If it tastes soft and cooked, and wet, crack the lid a lot more for 10-15 minutes and fluff again to dry it out. Yeah, yeah. I have rice starch all over my stove. Must clean that up some day. Fortunately, my housekeeper ignores the kitchen except for floors and garbage.
I have some fat brown rice, hard as rock, that needs 2.5C water and has to simmer for an hour before you crack the lid to dry it. Good strong nutty taste.

I don't know the changes that happen. Hydrated starches?
Day old refrigerated cooked rice is the very best fried rice of all in my kitchen.

Jun 19, 2021 - 1:05:04 AM

3600 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by bubbalouie

I took over a friends house that was fully equipped. I asked about the rice cooker. It's 2 to one water or stock to rice.  You set it up & you have a big tub of rice. Put it in the fridge & use it for the best fried rice. 

I used to make a lot of Chili. I'd plug in the rice cooker & people would say "Rice & Chili?"

Yes. Rice & chili.


Is that considered unusual to have rice with chilli in your neck of the woods Bob?  Over here it's the 'normal' accompaniment to chilli.  Never really liked it myself and would always rather have a bowl on its own or with tortillas but you'll always see the two together on most menus.

Jun 19, 2021 - 4:49:47 AM

Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

26068 posts since 8/3/2003

I use the Texmati brand and cook as per their instructions: 1 cup rice to 2 cups water, add butter and salt, bring it all to a boil, put a top on the pan, take it off the burner and set a timer for 15 minutes. Do not lift the top to see if it's getting done, just wait 15 minutes. If all the water is not evaporated, put the top back on and leave for another 5 minutes. Never had a problem making good, soft delicious rice. I also use a small pan. Don't know if that has anything to do with the way the rice cooks, but it's always worked for me.

Jun 19, 2021 - 6:17:46 AM
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15258 posts since 12/2/2005

As noted, there are many different types of rice in the world and they all require slightly different care. But there ARE some consistencies.

1) Avoid "Minute" or "Instant" rices. They're flavorless dog squeeze.
2) Parboiled rices such as Uncle Ben's can have nice texture if you follow the package directions but are basically flavorless.

Which brings us to everything else. Step one: WASH YOUR RICE. Quality rice is dusty - that dust being minute particles of rice from the harvest, drying and packing processes. Put the amount of rice you want in a bowl, add a bunch of water, swirl it around with your hand for 20 or 30 seconds. You'll be amazed how milky the water looks! Drain in through a fine-meshed sieve and repeat the process 3 or four more times until the water is clear. Drain it through the sieve one more time and let it sit in the sieve for about five minutes to drip through. Then, put it in your cooking pot.

How much water or stock? Beats me. I never measure, either the rice or the liquid. But I CAN tell you that if you then add liquid until the top of the liquid is between 1/4 to 1/3" above the top of the rice, you'll have the correct amount.

Set this over high heat and bring it to a boil. Once at the boil, back it off to very low and cover it. Let it steam. Do NOT stir it. After ten or fifteen minutes, remove the lid and take a small amount from the top of the rice and test it. If it's done, remove from the heat. If not, let it go a little longer.

Keep it covered until ready to serve. THEN you can fluff it.

This is for basic everyday rice (my go-to is jasmine rice from Thailand). Other rices, as noted, require slightly different techniques.

Jun 19, 2021 - 7:12:30 AM
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slammer

USA

3233 posts since 12/30/2008
Online Now

“Rice and Chili”. What the hell is wrong with you people??? LOL
Never heard of that combo, but then again , I eat some pretty goofy combos myself.
My old co-worker put mushrooms in his chili. I love mushrooms, but refused to eat his chili cuz that’s just wrong!!!
BTW, my rice gets rinsed in cold water till water runs clear before cooking. 1 cup rice and two cups water in da pot. Pinch of salt , Pat of butter and bring to a boil. When boiling , turn down heat to low and simmer 20 minutes. Remove from heat and let sit for at least 15 minutes.
If you want light fluffy rice for a salad or cilantro-lime rice like they have at qdoba or Chipotle , I boil the rice in copious amounts of water. 1 cup in at least 3 qts of water and boil till alienate. Remove from heat and strain all water and rinse with cold water immediately.
Add lime juice, cilantro or whatever your adding. Fluffy and amazing!!!
Slammer!!!

Edited by - slammer on 06/19/2021 07:26:15

Jun 19, 2021 - 8:19:16 AM

649 posts since 10/9/2017

quote:
Originally posted by flyingsquirrelinlay

I've never been able to make a really good stovetop rice dish that doesn't taste (look) like papier mache. I don't have the pots for steaming (nor the space to store them). So who has a good tasting, fool-proof recipe?


When you say "rice dish" do you mean "a dish of rice" or "a dish that has rice in it"? You've had lots of input on the former (although there are definitely two schools of thought on washing rice). On the latter, let me suggest kedgeree, which is a traditional Anglo-Indian dish that I consider to be the food of the gods.

This is my go-to recipe, with modifications: BBC Ultimate Kedgeree

Jun 19, 2021 - 9:54:49 AM

1179 posts since 12/2/2013

Thanks to all! Long ago, my Dad was the business manager of a private school and one of the dishes the kitchen regularly offered was chicken ala king over rice. And while I have marked several of these recipes, none of them are over rice!!!; that is the source of my question. To Wayne. I got similar advice from a cook 20 years ago, baking not stovetop; does it matter if my sauce pan is steel or glass. I'm not looking to be the king of my kitchen, I would just like to find a foolproof recipe for rice (topped by chopped chicken, beef or spaghetti pasta. There is only one person I need to please, ME.

Jun 19, 2021 - 10:37:48 AM

Brian T

Canada

18357 posts since 6/5/2008

One dish with rice in it? For me, that has to be fried rice with whatever fine dice meaty thing I might have. My guts like this in large quantity, at least 2 days with this quantity.

Cook 1C rice, let it cool, fluff, refrige until tomorrow.

Next day, scramble 2-3 eggs,
- fine dice 1C onion & 4 cloves garlic
- steam 2C frozen mixed veg.
- Fine dice 2C left over chicken, bison, whatever.
>Big wok on hi. oil. onion and garlic in next.
Rice next to warm up, then mixed veg, the meat and egg.
Good soya sauce and a sprinkle of sesame oil.
>All the time stir until steaming and it sizzles.

Grouse, pork schnitzel, bison kebab, fried chicken, whatever I find usually provokes me to do this.

Jun 19, 2021 - 11:39:01 AM

15258 posts since 12/2/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Remsleep
quote:

When you say "rice dish" do you mean "a dish of rice" or "a dish that has rice in it"? You've had lots of input on the former (although there are definitely two schools of thought on washing rice). On the latter, let me suggest kedgeree, which is a traditional Anglo-Indian dish that I consider to be the food of the gods.

 


This is a reasonable point. As mentioned, different rices require slightly different techniques - and that involves preparation. A rice porridge or congee WANTS to be sticky and moister; washing the rice in such an event wouldn't be a reasonable decision. A similar argument can be made for risotto, which wants the rice toasted in hot fat before starting to add liquid. I made the assumption that FSI was asking about basic rice prep for everyday use.

Jun 19, 2021 - 3:47:31 PM

1179 posts since 12/2/2013

I don't know what many terms in cuisine mean; as I said before, I'm not looking for something special, just something that is predictable, repeatable and good tasting.

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