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Jun 14, 2021 - 5:27:56 AM

Owen

Canada

8976 posts since 6/5/2011

..... then again, maybe not:       

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/edmonton-man-in-australia-sets-guinness-record-for-fastest-run-on-sand-in-snowshoes-1.6057877?fbclid=IwAR2z31aUFjShSIPPiiP95Qc9laM-a3Gk766mTSuoPtTERNFgFGyyG3PYMug

I've never sandshoed, and only ever snowshoed with Ojibway(?)-style snowshoes..... and sofar as I know the "tails" were supposed to drag.... i.e. toe up to rise above the snow in front.  I've seen several clips of guys using the new, high-tech, lightweight ones and generally they show the heels flipping up.   Is this tail-lift the way it should be, or could the dude lower his time with a different technique?

* And I expect all BHO experts to chime in.... I'll be disappointed mightily if we don't get at least 3 or 4 pages!!  wink

Jun 14, 2021 - 6:06:58 AM

dawgdoc

USA

9069 posts since 8/25/2004

Mine do.  On long sled dog races there is always a rule that one must carry a pair.  I got the lightest one's available but only used them camping.  Dogs love flat wide tails because it's a place of respite from deep snow.  Then you faceplant.  Mine most certainly flip up and if they don't it causes foul words to form.

Edited by - dawgdoc on 06/14/2021 06:08:03

Jun 14, 2021 - 6:26:13 AM

Owen

Canada

8976 posts since 6/5/2011

Like I say, I've never used the new style, but doesn't tail up [i.e. nose down] portend bad words..... unless snow isn't deep enuff to require snowshoes in the first place?

Jun 14, 2021 - 4:42:58 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

15124 posts since 9/27/2007

I think those are closer to Clown shoes than Snow shoes! 

Jun 14, 2021 - 5:51:32 PM
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dawgdoc

USA

9069 posts since 8/25/2004

I was at a race one time and the camp was at this cabin (true story, where the murders happened the Shining was based on), stepped off the sled and sunk to my shoulders.  Clown shoes, absolutely.  You look like a clown, but they work.

Jun 14, 2021 - 5:53:56 PM

dawgdoc

USA

9069 posts since 8/25/2004

You gotta learn to lift up too. It’s not a trivial amount of work

Jun 14, 2021 - 8:08:58 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

15124 posts since 9/27/2007

That's exactly how those sand shoes would work Doc! I've used the traditional ones that Owen mentioned. They'd work the best!

What would look better in the snowbank outside the cabin door?

Jun 14, 2021 - 11:02:57 PM
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Brian T

Canada

18357 posts since 6/5/2008

I have 3 different pairs of snow shoes. Depends upon what I'm doing but not so much on snow depth. I weigh about 200 lbs so they all are big enough for my weight class.

Travel on fairly level terrain, going from A to B and not much dawddling.
I use 60" trail breakers, just 12" wide, pointed tips and the tails are meant to drag.
Because they are so narrow, they are really comfortable, not that bow-legged ache.
Wood frames and hide strips, they do need varnishing every few years when they saw steady use. My all-time favorite to get around in the snow.

Bird Hunting: Chasing grouse into the forest 50 yds and back out again. Wood frames and hide strips again. Bear-paw classic shape. Light weight, easy to pick up you whole foot to step over a log or turn around (that's a big deal to me). Meant for tail drag.

Work. New ball game. Rebuilt aluminum frame Sherpa with ice claws and step through bindings. Synthetic lashing to fabric-core decks. They weigh next to nothing.
Pretty easy to turn around, magic on hard pack and slopes with the claws underneath. Locked tight enough on your boots that with a bit of a run, you can jump an average barb wire fence. Don't mess that up.

Industrial Reproductions Limited (IRL) in Prince George, BC is building Sherpa design for industry. Nice to shop for parts in there like a grocery store.

Looks to me like all the modern recreational snow shoes are metals frames and synthetics. One advantage is that they are easy to fix, easy to source parts and nothing soaks up water and freezes. All the wood frame ones are now hanging over somebody's fire place because they can't get off their can and use them.

Jun 15, 2021 - 5:28:32 AM

Owen

Canada

8976 posts since 6/5/2011

>>>>>>> I'm still wondering what the circumstances are [other than walking (?) backward] where it would be a benefit to have the back end higher than the front.  <<<<<<< 

I've checked a couple of "how to" videos, and they  explain how the toe of the boot should go down through the hole so the  the tail can stay down.  Then some  go on to show them in use with the tail sometimes flipping up. What the ?????? [My research (?) also tells me I've used Huron style, not Ojibwe.]

For me, the leg spread isn't as pronounced as  some might think.... it only has to be enough for the inner edge of the snowshoe to bypass the other leg; not out so wide it bypasses the inner edge of the other snowshoe ..... part of one  snowshoe can [should??] pass over part of the other one.   Anyhow, in the absence of expert instruction when I was first learning, that's what I came to conclude.   Another thing I never did figure out was why I'd usually sink 1/2 the depth of the snow when making a new trail, with the condition/type of snow frequently not making much diff ..... 1 foot of snow, sink 6".... 2 feet, sink 1 foot... 6 feet, sink 3 feet, etc.  I don't think that's how it's supposed to work, is it?

My 3 pair hang unused on a wall in the garage..... wonky knees more so than lack of desire.  sad

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