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May 10, 2021 - 7:14:52 AM
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1510 posts since 7/14/2004

Here is one for the 1917 Enfield owners/fans.  Eddystone Enfield Serial # 1,000,000, sold at auction for $18,400.  WOW!  Feast your eyes on this one.

https://www.rockislandauction.com/detail/80/1425/serial-number-1000000-us-eddystone-model-1917-rifle

May 10, 2021 - 7:28:17 AM

ChunoTheDog

Canada

824 posts since 8/9/2019

Wow....the stock is really something on this one, too. What a beauty

May 10, 2021 - 8:09:08 AM

11928 posts since 1/15/2005

That is really neat! Rock Island auctions off some really neat guns. I love looking thought their guns that are up for auction. I do wish they had more photos and complete descriptions, but that is hard to do when you are auctioning as many as 2000 guns in an auction. I keep checking their catalog for a early 30's Winchester Model 63 carbine (20" barrel).

May 10, 2021 - 8:25:28 AM

1510 posts since 7/14/2004

I wonder where this rifle is now.  Is it in the possession of a private collector or a museum somewhere?  The wife of the Eddystone plant general manager donated it to the Franklin Institute in Philly. I have an Eddystone in the one and one quarter million serial range, made near the end of the production run just before the end of the war. It seems to be all original Eddy with all parts stamped with an "E".

May 10, 2021 - 8:28:20 AM
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3464 posts since 4/22/2018

Now that's a Bobby Dazzler!

.....apart from the bloody awful metal 'scroll' on the butt

May 10, 2021 - 8:36:03 AM

1510 posts since 7/14/2004

quote:
Originally posted by Wet Spaniel

Now that's a Bobby Dazzler!

.....apart from the bloody awful metal 'scroll' on the butt


Yes, they could have done without the scroll on the stock. It diminishes the beauty of this unique piece of history.  

May 10, 2021 - 12:47:35 PM
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figmo59

USA

33413 posts since 3/5/2008
Online Now

I like mine ..better...


I can shoot it without deminishing it's value... ;0)

May 10, 2021 - 1:57:24 PM

Ron C

USA

1448 posts since 3/17/2004

I am very pleased with the Eddystone 1917 and Remington 1917. Their value is a lot less than the auction ones, but both are shootable and useable.

Eddystone

Remington

May 10, 2021 - 2:29:21 PM
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1510 posts since 7/14/2004

Nice looking 17's Ron. The Remington looks like the stock may have been refinished.

I have owned 6 1917 Enfield's.  4 sporterized and 2 in Mil configuration. None are scope mounted.  All have rear aperture sights. I love the Enfield.  I bought my first one from Klein's Sporting Goods in Chicago about 1965 for $85.00. Delivered to my front door my US mail, no paperwork, no questions asked. In the 60's you could buy a crate of 10 Enfields for $200.surprise Oh if only I had jumped on that opportunity.

I highly recommend the book "United States Rifle Model Of 1917" by C. S. Ferris. Its a must have for any Enfield fan.

May 10, 2021 - 4:00:43 PM

3464 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by figmo59

I like mine ..better...


I can shoot it without deminishing it's value... ;0)


There's a lot to be said for that Al.  I spent a lot (for me) of money on my first shotgun and then spent a lot of time in goose hides etc worrying about what the typical Yorkshire/Scottish weather was doing to the woodwork.  I now go for a slightly more 'agricultural' approach.

Edited by - Wet Spaniel on 05/10/2021 16:04:50

May 10, 2021 - 4:03:30 PM

3464 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by Ron C

I am very pleased with the Eddystone 1917 and Remington 1917. Their value is a lot less than the auction ones, but both are shootable and useable.


just wonderful,to own those little pieces of history Ron.  And, that they are shot, not just looked at.

May 10, 2021 - 4:12:20 PM

Ron C

USA

1448 posts since 3/17/2004

quote:
Originally posted by Sheenjack

Nice looking 17's Ron. The Remington looks like the stock may have been refinished.

I have owned 6 1917 Enfield's.  4 sporterized and 2 in Mil configuration. None are scope mounted.  All have rear aperture sights. I love the Enfield.  I bought my first one from Klein's Sporting Goods in Chicago about 1965 for $85.00. Delivered to my front door my US mail, no paperwork, no questions asked. In the 60's you could buy a crate of 10 Enfields for $200.surprise Oh if only I had jumped on that opportunity.

I highly recommend the book "United States Rifle Model Of 1917" by C. S. Ferris. Its a must have for any Enfield fan.


I suspect you are right about the refinish. I know about the preference for the 1903, but the 17 just feels and holds well for me. The book you mention is somewhere in my unorganized library of historic battle weapons. On the computer, I have the Ordnance Field Service Base Shop Data, U.S. RIfle, Ca. .30, M1917; and the Description and Rules for the Management of the Uniteed States Rifle, Cal. .30, Model of 1917, January 8, 1918. Somehow this reminds me that my 1864 Snider-Enfield rifle needs a relubing and dusting.smiley

Ron

May 10, 2021 - 8:49:26 PM

Tommy5

USA

3753 posts since 2/22/2009

Sargent York used an M-17 Enfield, Eddystone in his Medal of Honor assault in WW1. In the movie, Gary Cooper uses an 03 Springfield.

May 11, 2021 - 4:31:13 AM

Ron C

USA

1448 posts since 3/17/2004

quote:
Originally posted by Wet Spaniel
quote:
Originally posted by Ron C

I am very pleased with the Eddystone 1917 and Remington 1917. Their value is a lot less than the auction ones, but both are shootable and useable.


just wonderful,to own those little pieces of history Ron.  And, that they are shot, not just looked at.


I feel as though I am holding history in my hands. My collection is loaded with British military rifles: Lee Enfield Mk. III; No. 1 Mark IV, "Jungle " carbine, Martini Henry 1884. A treasured rifle is a flintlock made in 1991, built around an original, H.W. Mortimer, armorer to the Queen lock, made between 1790 and 1810.

May 11, 2021 - 8:07:19 AM

11928 posts since 1/15/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Ron C
quote:
Originally posted by Wet Spaniel
quote:
Originally posted by Ron C

I am very pleased with the Eddystone 1917 and Remington 1917. Their value is a lot less than the auction ones, but both are shootable and useable.


just wonderful,to own those little pieces of history Ron.  And, that they are shot, not just looked at.


I feel as though I am holding history in my hands. My collection is loaded with British military rifles: Lee Enfield Mk. III; No. 1 Mark IV, "Jungle " carbine, Martini Henry 1884. A treasured rifle is a flintlock made in 1991, built around an original, H.W. Mortimer, armorer to the Queen lock, made between 1790 and 1810.


That is really neat Ron.  As much as I like to shoot, it is also fun to own these things because of their history and the fact that they are amazing pieces of "machinery".  In many ways I consider them art.  Some of our UK (except Jonty) and US friends have a hard time understnding our attachment to guns ...... not me!

May 11, 2021 - 8:59:41 AM

1510 posts since 7/14/2004

BanjoLink,

Did you see any 1917 Enfield's or 1903A3 Springfield's in use during your tour in Viet Nam?

May 11, 2021 - 10:15:32 AM

11928 posts since 1/15/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Sheenjack

BanjoLink,

Did you see any 1917 Enfield's or 1903A3 Springfield's in use during your tour in Viet Nam?

 


No I didn't.  Most of what I saw on the battlefield were what I thought were Chinese made AK-47's and SKS's.  It would not have surprised me to find one though, as I am sure there were a lot of them left over from previous conflicts.  Most of the SKS's looked a lot like this battlefield rifle that I own.  If you look closely you will see several battlefield repairs and replacement parts ..... pretty typical.  Don't know why it showed two upside down, but you get the picture!






 

Edited by - BanjoLink on 05/11/2021 10:17:06

May 11, 2021 - 11:33:05 AM
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RonR

USA

1825 posts since 11/29/2012

I work in Eddystone PA some days. There was a munitions factory there in WWI that was supposedly blown up by Russian spies, killing several hundred women that worked there. I think the buildings where they made the rifles later became Baldwin Locomotive Works. Today it is office buildings.

May 11, 2021 - 12:15:49 PM
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Ron C

USA

1448 posts since 3/17/2004

quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink
quote:
Originally posted by Ron C
quote:
Originally posted by Wet Spaniel
quote:
Originally posted by Ron C

I am very pleased with the Eddystone 1917 and Remington 1917. Their value is a lot less than the auction ones, but both are shootable and useable.


just wonderful,to own those little pieces of history Ron.  And, that they are shot, not just looked at.


I feel as though I am holding history in my hands. My collection is loaded with British military rifles: Lee Enfield Mk. III; No. 1 Mark IV, "Jungle " carbine, Martini Henry 1884. A treasured rifle is a flintlock made in 1991, built around an original, H.W. Mortimer, armorer to the Queen lock, made between 1790 and 1810.


That is really neat Ron.  As much as I like to shoot, it is also fun to own these things because of their history and the fact that they are amazing pieces of "machinery".  In many ways I consider them art.  Some of our UK (except Jonty) and US friends have a hard time understnding our attachment to guns ...... not me!


As a middle class earner and an inveterate collector with a fascination with history, historic firearms were one of he few items I could afford to admire and buy. Of course great art of the past was far beyond my means. But a Japanese Arasaka 99 rifle used in the Pacific in WWII, at $200, was affordable. A brace (pair) of 1816/1822 French calvary pistols converted from flintlock to percussion in the 1850s, at $350 each, could be managed. These firearms fulfill my interests and collectors compulsions. I still get a thrill out of handling them!

May 11, 2021 - 12:24:39 PM

Ron C

USA

1448 posts since 3/17/2004

quote:
Originally posted by RonR

I work in Eddystone PA some days. There was a munitions factory there in WWI that was supposedly blown up by Russian spies, killing several hundred women that worked there. I think the buildings where they made the rifles later became Baldwin Locomotive Works. Today it is office buildings.


How long a drive is it from Philadelphia to Eddystone? Did the town of Eddystone build up around the factory?

Thanks,

Ron

May 11, 2021 - 12:48:14 PM

11928 posts since 1/15/2005

quote:
Originally posted by RonR

I work in Eddystone PA some days. There was a munitions factory there in WWI that was supposedly blown up by Russian spies, killing several hundred women that worked there. I think the buildings where they made the rifles later became Baldwin Locomotive Works. Today it is office buildings.


RonR, not to get too far off "track", but my son was digging up a leaking waterline at his golf facility a couple of years ago and turned up a Baldwin Locomotive Works build-plate from an old locomotive.  The site of his golf facility is the spot where the debris of one of the old rail stations in Atlanta was buried when MARTA was built.  After some research, it appears that this old build plate is worth in the neighborhood of $1000.

Edited by - BanjoLink on 05/11/2021 12:48:33

May 11, 2021 - 1:24:30 PM

1510 posts since 7/14/2004

Going to take a little side trip here from the main topic.

Good Reads for gun lovers. Books that are in my collection.

Firearm Design & Assembly : The Finishing of Gunstocks and Conversions of the 1917 Enfield Rifle - by Alvin Linden a master gunstock maker. A great book on sporterizing the 1917. Interesting even if you have no desire to sporterize. Available from book sellers on line, about $20.

Standard catalog of Smith and Wesson by Jim Supica. Beautifully illustrated and definitive work on every facet of Smith and Wesson handguns. A must have.

The S&W Revolver, A shop Manual by Jerry Kuhnhausen, Essential reference book if you collect and like to work on Smith and Wesson revo's such as I do.

May 11, 2021 - 1:29:38 PM
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1510 posts since 7/14/2004

quote:
Originally posted by RonR

I work in Eddystone PA some days. There was a munitions factory there in WWI that was supposedly blown up by Russian spies, killing several hundred women that worked there. I think the buildings where they made the rifles later became Baldwin Locomotive Works. Today it is office buildings.


RonR, You can read about the Eddystone disaster here;

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eddystone_explosion

May 11, 2021 - 2:48:02 PM

Ron C

USA

1448 posts since 3/17/2004

quote:
Originally posted by Sheenjack

Going to take a little side trip here from the main topic.

Good Reads for gun lovers. Books that are in my collection.

Firearm Design & Assembly : The Finishing of Gunstocks and Conversions of the 1917 Enfield Rifle - by Alvin Linden a master gunstock maker. A great book on sporterizing the 1917. Interesting even if you have no desire to sporterize. Available from book sellers on line, about $20.

Standard catalog of Smith and Wesson by Jim Supica. Beautifully illustrated and definitive work on every facet of Smith and Wesson handguns. A must have.

The S&W Revolver, A shop Manual by Jerry Kuhnhausen, Essential reference book if you collect and like to work on Smith and Wesson revo's such as I do.


Thank you!

May 11, 2021 - 2:54:29 PM

11928 posts since 1/15/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Sheenjack
quote:
Originally posted by RonR

I work in Eddystone PA some days. There was a munitions factory there in WWI that was supposedly blown up by Russian spies, killing several hundred women that worked there. I think the buildings where they made the rifles later became Baldwin Locomotive Works. Today it is office buildings.


RonR, You can read about the Eddystone disaster here;

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eddystone_explosion


Pretty fascinating reading about the rifle plant too.  I am still amazed at how quickly they were able to get plants up and running those days.  Guess they didn't have to go thru all of the red tape that we do now.

May 11, 2021 - 3:33:47 PM

1510 posts since 7/14/2004

20 shot group from a bench rest at 100 yards with one of my sporter Remington 1917's, Redfield rear aperture sight. Decent accuracy from a barrel thats over 100 years old and may have seen service in the muddy trenches in France, firing corrosive ammo.

Bought this rifle about 10 years ago. It is fitted to an old Bishop stock probably from the 1950's. It had excess headspace when I bought it.  I replaced the bolt with one I found on ebay and that solved the headspace problem.  Most Enfields do have excess headspace. They made them that way.


 

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