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May 9, 2021 - 7:44:01 PM

mander

USA

4624 posts since 10/7/2007

I still struggle to shop via the internet. Don't know why, but I want to hold it in my hands before I buy something.
Last year, I have no idea how, neither does my son, but a large container of Meat Church Holy Cow seasoning showed up in my kitchen. I used it up last week. I have tried to find it here locally, to no avail. My son likes to say, "Mother, I'm going to drag you into the 21st century kicking and screaming every step of the way, but drag you, I shall!" He thinks I should get over my need to hold something in my hand before buying it. I am almost ready to buy via the internet because I really like this spice.

How do you fare shopping on line?

Anyone else out there like the Meat Church product line? Other spices you recommend for steak?

May 9, 2021 - 8:43:43 PM

Brian T

Canada

18170 posts since 6/5/2008

I shop on line only for things that I can't buy here in the village. Clothing and specialty wood carving tools. Got in the habit of buying again and again from the same places, some have been surprisingly helpful.

I buy some herb and spice mixes from 2 local agents. Otherwise, I mix my own from the individual ingredients. Half a dozen different dry rubs for smoker BBQ.

I collect salt. I buy salt from crazy people all over the world. Works out OK.
You need coffee salt and chocolate salt. Otherwise stick to the plain sea salts.
The ones kakked up with nuts and berries are nothing special that you can't make at home like lime salt or lemon salt.

Certified organic meat, eggs and vegetables are easy to get here all summer.
Potatoes, onions and carrots keep until the new year.

A couple of 2 AM credit card purchases have puzzled me. So I began to write down the details.
What the hell did I spend $114.16 on Friday night?

May 9, 2021 - 9:43:48 PM
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Paul R

Canada

14507 posts since 1/28/2010
Online Now

I'd rather shop in person and deal with real people, and keep them in business, if possible. There have been too many friendly, helpful folks that have gone out of business around here. Admittedly some have aged out, but others could (should) still be around were it not for the 'net.

Our local downtown guitar shop, with the best repair person in these parts, shut down a couple of years ago. The guy was fed up with people coming into the shop, pumping him for advice, and then going shopping on line. Now I have to drive way out of town to get a decent repair job from him.

May 10, 2021 - 3:12:29 AM
Players Union Member

OM45GE

USA

107070 posts since 11/7/2007

I will shop and buy from locally owned businesses whenever possible and will gladly pay a premium to do so. However, if the “local” option is a big chain operation, I’ll go with on-line.

May 10, 2021 - 4:48:41 AM

Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

25937 posts since 8/3/2003

I also prefer to buy locally, if I can. However, I've found that much of what I seem to want/need isn't available at our local stores so.... to the internet I go. I do check locally first, then order on the net.

Last year I did a whole lot more internet buying because of the pandemic. That brought me into the 21st century quickly, as there were no stores open in which to shop locally and if you needed anything that couldn't be bought at Walmart or other big box stores, you were just out of luck.

Ordered groceries for the first time last year. I still prefer to go to the store and pick up my own items and have gone back to that now that we are getting back to some sort of normalcy.

I've found that I really like to order e-books. You always have them, you can put them "in the cloud" (wherever that is) and come back to them if you want and it doesn't clutter up bookshelves in the house and you don't have dozens of books that you'll never read again sitting around to dust.

Just a caveat for anyone ordering online: be sure you know the company and that it's a safe company from which to order. I won't order from a company that I've never heard of before. Do research before you give some strange company your credit card.

Edited by - Texasbanjo on 05/10/2021 04:49:27

May 10, 2021 - 6:05:59 AM
Players Union Member

wizofos

USA

5980 posts since 8/19/2012

I prefer buying locally and try to do that as often as possible but small towns don't always have what you are looking for, in that case I head to the internet. Luckily we have a pretty good music store and lumber yard/hardware store in town but if they don't have it the nearest shopping is 20-30 miles away and no guarantee that is it available so I spend a lot of time on the phone verifying availability before driving into the 'big city'.

May 10, 2021 - 6:42:59 AM

Owen

Canada

8620 posts since 6/5/2011

I know a business has to bring in more than it spends, but I dunno just where the "gladly pay a premium" that OM45GE mentions peters out.  

Here's one that's a sound basis for extrapolation: 1" to 3/4" bushing for vehicle hitch..... $4.99 yocally....... 99 cents in Brandon.     [I wasn't needing one.... I just noticed the $4.99 while in a shop on other business and thought it seemed quite a bit for what was involved .... thankfully/luckily (?) that time I was able to avoid having to make a tough decision.]

May 10, 2021 - 6:43:54 AM

banjo bill-e

Tuvalu

11083 posts since 2/22/2007

In the heart of a big city you can find most anything, but the going and getting can be a major ordeal. Amazon has same day and sometimes two hour delivery. I ordered coffee in the morning and it was there by noon. In remote areas, Amazon can be the only game in town. Either way, they now have a most compelling offer. I don't see how any other provider can compete.
The last time I spent an hour walking the concrete floors of Home Depot I was over it. I order almost everything online now.

May 10, 2021 - 7:15:55 AM

2654 posts since 2/10/2013

I use the internet more and more. I don't like driving, searching, and not finding what I want, or only seeing a limited selection. And I attempt to avoid stores that don't use live cashiers.
I regularly order some things on the internet and get them in a day or two.

The internet reminds me of the old Sears Roebuck and Montgomery Ward catalog sales.
Shipping is faster now and we use the internet instead of a catalogue, but the method of sales is about the same. if some merchandisers did more to accommodate the buyer than their operation their sales would improve.

One economist said elimination of small merchandising operations are detrimental to the economy. I have seen small towns where just about all the small locally owned enterprises have been replaced by a single large chain. If things haven't changed, there is a small community in upstate New York that passed an ordinance banning large chains. They rely heavily on tourism, and think tourists will find the plentiful small restaurants, stores, etc., an attractive feature.

At one time, small store employers/employees were known to customers and were considered personal friends. I would pay a little more to shop at a well stocked small local enterprise.

May 10, 2021 - 7:23:47 AM

3482 posts since 4/22/2018
Online Now

I can't stand shopping for clothes etc and will buy online if I can - anything to stop me having to travel to town. I will always buy local if I can for home improvement etc, but anything else is done online

I also work predominantly for a large online retailer, so please do keep using them - it's paying my mortgage smiley

May 10, 2021 - 7:51:01 AM

3559 posts since 4/29/2012
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by Wet Spaniel

I can't stand shopping for clothes etc and will buy online if I can - anything to stop me having to travel to town. I will always buy local if I can for home improvement etc, but anything else is done online

I also work predominantly for a large online retailer, so please do keep using them - it's paying my mortgage smiley


Me too. I buy shoes in a shop - But everything else has been online for years. And if your 'large online retailer' is the one beginning with A - I only buy e-books from them as nobody has to piss in a bottle to get them to me.

For the last year just about everything else (which mostly means food and drink) has also been online. Can't see me going back.

May 10, 2021 - 8:05:43 AM
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m06

England

10051 posts since 10/5/2006

Ditto Paul, I try and support the small trader and much prefer to purchase stuff in person.

But even with the best will nowadays it’s not always possible. The commercial environment is going (has gone?) in the opposite direction because more people value convenience over personal contact.

Maybe some of those people will eventually realise the importance and regret the lack of human touch they’ve rejected for speed and faceless anonymity? 

Edited by - m06 on 05/10/2021 08:08:37

May 10, 2021 - 8:50:51 AM

3482 posts since 4/22/2018
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by AndrewD

Me too. I buy shoes in a shop - But everything else has been online for years. And if your 'large online retailer' is the one beginning with A - I only buy e-books from them as nobody has to piss in a bottle to get them to me.

For the last year just about everything else (which mostly means food and drink) has also been online. Can't see me going back.


I doubt they are the only ones peeing in bottles smiley

I've been wearing the same make/model of trainers day in day out for  over 10 years.  When the sole starts to come away I just order a replacement pair - I'm dreading the day they stop making them and I have to go somewhere to try on a new pair.

May 10, 2021 - 7:25:07 PM

Brian T

Canada

18170 posts since 6/5/2008

Mander: read this:
I decided that I needed to buy 4 flannel shirts. XXL, Carhartt and Point Zero brands I like.
So I email my favorite little Men's Wear place. Explain what I want.

Those guys laid out 12 shirts in groups of 3, took pictures and emailed the pix to me.
"Which ones do you want?"
I email my choices and I get my shirts in less than 2 weeks. Because there is so little overhead to post the orders, I got about a 25% discount on the shirt prices (which can run $90 each).
Such a simple strategy to encourage me to shop on line with them again.

May 10, 2021 - 9:28:03 PM

donc

Canada

6567 posts since 2/9/2010

It's easy to pull the wool over my eyes when all I can see is a drawing or a doctored photograph. I was searching for John Pearse hi-rider picks which can't be found anywhere around here. Amazon had some look-alike picks so for a whole $8 for 6 picks I said 'Why not' . The Amazon Canada tracker eventually told me they were being shipped from China. So... what could go wrong I quietly asked myself ? When these things arrived I couldn't believe it. They appear to be made from recycled tin cans . I'm not exaggerating. The metal is so flimsy they won't stay tight on any finger. The edges are coarse and jagged. It makes the banjo sound like a kid's toy. I finally ordered a real set from Banjo Ben's in Missouri. They are due to be here Wednesday. Ben uses the U.S. postal service which connects with Canada Post. Those two are not a winning combination in the delivery business. 17 days in transit so far.

May 11, 2021 - 3:42:25 AM
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4082 posts since 12/6/2009

It’s getting to the point that if you really need an item it seems it’s an item that’s been removed from all local stores and outlets…..yesterday’s example;…we need an exterior door threshold that has the rubber seal that presses against the door bottom. (OAK) I’ve renovated 500 million houses and they were always available on the shelves of local hardware, lumber yards, and home depot. Lowes etc……Not anymore….so online I go…. Home depot will have my order to the store in 3 days….12 dollars…free shipping .eeessshhhhhh….very little choice on lawn mower blades now also…..hardly any lawn tractor repair parts at all….etc…..the biggest part of my day now is when I need something now, spending time in front of this newfangled “boob tube” finding it on line. I am so glad I am nearing the end of my road…..Truth….9 out of 10 things I needed in the past year I had to order on line……even a stupid carburetor for a generator. [ someone is hiding in the bushes with binoculars watching to see what I may need then quickly running to all the local stores removing them from the shelves]

Edited by - overhere on 05/11/2021 03:45:06

May 11, 2021 - 6:18:29 AM
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Owen

Canada

8620 posts since 6/5/2011

quote:
Originally posted by overhere.
<snip>  [ someone is hiding in the bushes with binoculars watching to see what I may need then quickly running to all the local stores removing them from the shelves]

Nuthin' to do with the internet, but ^^ reminds me:  Back about 1981 we were at a music festival [...hold on... there's more coming].  A few of us were sitting, shooting the breeze, when the owner of the yocal Home Hardware passed by, occasionally glancing/peering into the bushes/shrubbery as he went. One of the wise guys in our group observed: "Ah, it's just Metro, checking to see how many baby carriages to order for next spring."

May 11, 2021 - 12:15:08 PM

donc

Canada

6567 posts since 2/9/2010

I'm always fascinated when history repeats itself. In 1895 North America was an agricultural community. The majority of the population had little access to big city stores. Along came Sears-Roebuck with their mail order service. By the 1950's cars and paved highways were almost universal. The mail order business plugged along with ads in Popular Mechanics and other specialty items. By the 80's big box stores where in every community. The next step was a bigger box warehouse in another part of the country. Here we are in the dark again. We can't always see what we are buying and we often don't get our purchases until the following week or month. I'm beginning to loose sight of the meaning of 'progress'.

May 11, 2021 - 5:46:23 PM

2484 posts since 4/5/2006

I try to support the local businesses when I can. But when my back is to the wall & it's either do without or go online, the internet is my best friend. Even though I dislike doing business with a certain popular internet shopping site, I have to give credit where credit is due. The concept is brilliant. And it's really supporting a couple million other small businesses it's just well, you'll just have to read between the lines. 

There have been many times the internet have saved me time, gas, & shoe leather when looking for something & find one of the local stores has it in stock. There are some things you just can't expect local vendors to stock. Items not on everyone's shopping list, discontinued, lightly used treasures, banjo's fly-fishing gear old cars/parts, what have you. smiley

May 12, 2021 - 3:26:27 AM
like this

4082 posts since 12/6/2009

quote:
Originally posted by donc

I'm always fascinated when history repeats itself. In 1895 North America was an agricultural community. The majority of the population had little access to big city stores. Along came Sears-Roebuck with their mail order service. By the 1950's cars and paved highways were almost universal. The mail order business plugged along with ads in Popular Mechanics and other specialty items. By the 80's big box stores where in every community. The next step was a bigger box warehouse in another part of the country. Here we are in the dark again. We can't always see what we are buying and we often don't get our purchases until the following week or month. I'm beginning to loose sight of the meaning of 'progress'.


There was a time when a mail order whatever was actually a quality of what you wanted and didn’t have to guess. Today you have to rely on experience of what you’re getting and expecting…..in 1890 if a man ordered a manure wagon from sears….he got a manure wagon…..today he’d get a bucket of  ***bleep

May 12, 2021 - 9:17:48 PM

mander

USA

4624 posts since 10/7/2007

quote:
Originally posted by Brian T

I shop on line only for things that I can't buy here in the village. Clothing and specialty wood carving tools. Got in the habit of buying again and again from the same places, some have been surprisingly helpful.

I buy some herb and spice mixes from 2 local agents. Otherwise, I mix my own from the individual ingredients. Half a dozen different dry rubs for smoker BBQ.

I collect salt. I buy salt from crazy people all over the world. Works out OK.
You need coffee salt and chocolate salt. Otherwise stick to the plain sea salts.
The ones kakked up with nuts and berries are nothing special that you can't make at home like lime salt or lemon salt.

Certified organic meat, eggs and vegetables are easy to get here all summer.
Potatoes, onions and carrots keep until the new year.

A couple of 2 AM credit card purchases have puzzled me. So I began to write down the details.
What the hell did I spend $114.16 on Friday night?


I had no idea that folks added salt to coffee. Something new to try!

I suppose I could mix my own, but I never do. Lost my enthusiasm for it somewhere along the line.

As to Friday night, if you don't remember, I ain't going to tell you! :-)

May 12, 2021 - 9:29:08 PM

Brian T

Canada

18170 posts since 6/5/2008

My dear Mander. You try to be so evil.
I had got into the habit of using a coil notebook for written records of all and everything interesting from my internet adventures.

$114.16 has bought me two quite large wood carving tools. I am carving "story poles" which are like totem poles but they describe an event or a journey or an important process in nature. In the life of a butterfly, there are eggs and growing caterpillars, then a cocoon and finally the winged butterfly. Two poles, just 5" diameter and 64" tall, these will be stories for children to learn on winter nights by the lodge fires.

Sleep well.

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