Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

716
Banjo Lovers Online


Apr 10, 2021 - 9:58:52 PM
like this
72 posts since 2/7/2017

Fretless laminated purpleheart and maple neck, myrtle vintage bowl with fiberglass on both sides (it broke into 8 pieces stretching the head and the neck was already fitted so I had to fix it), ebony violin pegs, goatskin head, nylon strings (Aquila Red Series), 24.5 inch scale, commercial bridge, also twisted up the goatskin rawhide twine for the tailpiece. Sounds good, I'm very happy with it. 

The lamination was difficult, used Gorilla glue; at first it slides all around, and then you can't slide it at all. I'd drill indexing holes for bolts if I do that again. Conveniently sized pre-cut craft wood was cheaper than a solid piece. 








Apr 11, 2021 - 4:37:50 AM
likes this
Players Union Member

Helix

USA

13941 posts since 8/30/2006

I just love this, very nicely done. The sliding around is called marrying the pieces. I do this all the time with Titebond 1.
Otherwise, the sound will just get better.

Apr 11, 2021 - 5:28:55 AM
like this

13527 posts since 6/29/2005

Quite an amazing instrument, and well designed and made—a real fusion of contemporary and primitive, and you pulled it off perfectly.

You can stop the sliding around of pieces during glue-up with a few grains of coarse salt, like kosher salt, on each joint as you are laying them up, which stops the sliding, but dissolves into the glue and doesn't compromise the joint.  Gorilla glue is very difficult to work with.

Apr 11, 2021 - 8:27:34 AM
likes this

607 posts since 7/10/2012

The contrast of the laminated purpleheart and maple is really striking. The reverse contrast for the 5th string is a lovely little detail as well. I'd love to hear this sing if you have the chance to post a sound file.

Also, for the slipping, I 2nd Ken's salt method. For laminated necks I also use a staple gun. Just shoot a staple halfway into a part of the neck that will be cut away, clip the top of the staple off the stems at a sharp angle, and you have two perfect little teeth to grab hold of the wood and keep it from sliding around.

Nice work, looking forward to seeing the next project!

Apr 11, 2021 - 10:51:10 AM
likes this

1527 posts since 4/29/2013

Well that's just downright pretty!

Apr 11, 2021 - 11:02:38 AM
likes this

61 posts since 1/11/2020

Wow that's a looker right there!
I don't like gorilla glue and I'm always surprised seeing people using it on instruments with success so kudos my friend!

Apr 11, 2021 - 11:47:50 AM

72 posts since 2/7/2017

quote:
Originally posted by Oldtimefeeling

Wow that's a looker right there!
I don't like gorilla glue and I'm always surprised seeing people using it on instruments with success so kudos my friend!


I'm open to suggestions, just wanted to use best thing. I understand it expands a bit to fill gaps. 

Apr 11, 2021 - 12:08:37 PM
likes this

ragalb

Canada

68 posts since 1/27/2021

that's so pretty! Congrats on a beautiful instrument. I like the consistency of the pip and tailpiece being striped as well. And the headstock looks great as well

Apr 11, 2021 - 1:30:08 PM

Fathand

Canada

11736 posts since 2/7/2008

I tried gluing a fingerboard on once with the salt trick and had to pry it off before the glue fully dried because there were gaps where the salt kept the fingerboard away from the neck.

Wrong salt? Too much salt?

Apr 12, 2021 - 9:17:07 AM

2561 posts since 6/19/2008

Rather than salt, a friend of mine turned me on to sand. I take a couple of pieces of 80 grit sand paper (the cheap stuff, not the non-clogging coated stuff) and rub them together over the area I want to grip. Salt is chemically reactive and although it appears harmless to the glue, why take a chance?

Fathand, your problem might be that you didn't clamp it tight enough where the salt was. Or maybe, the wood is just too hard for the salt grains to dig into it.

Apr 12, 2021 - 3:20:09 PM

Fathand

Canada

11736 posts since 2/7/2008

quote:
Originally posted by Jonnycake White

Rather than salt, a friend of mine turned me on to sand. I take a couple of pieces of 80 grit sand paper (the cheap stuff, not the non-clogging coated stuff) and rub them together over the area I want to grip. Salt is chemically reactive and although it appears harmless to the glue, why take a chance?

Fathand, your problem might be that you didn't clamp it tight enough where the salt was. Or maybe, the wood is just too hard for the salt grains to dig into it.


I put the middle of a 12 fret guitar neck into a 5" vise and add about 8 C clamps as tight as I can make them. Maybe the ebony finger board was too hard but I would have guessed the mahogany neck was soft enough. I'm thinking too much salt

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.1875