Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

833
Banjo Lovers Online


Mar 1, 2021 - 4:16:42 PM
6 posts since 5/29/2012

To all Gibson banjo nerds and aficionados, I am seeking your assistance with a hunt I am on.

I recently became the owner of a pretty special 1942 TB75 flathead, FON F5637-4. This banjo was sold decades and many owners ago without its original tenor neck based on research done by a fellow collector and friend (thank you Roger for the leads).

The neck would be like the one featured here; RB1 gull pattern inlays with a crude Gibson scroll on the headstock with a Fleur de Lis across the center. The back of the peghead would feature the FON much like its littermates and many other Style 75s of the era. The mastertone block would be a straight, simple, unlabeled block sans the typical block letters we are used to seeing.

I know it is a long shot, but if anyone knows the whereabouts I would love to be able to purchase the neck from whomever may possess it in order to round out the collectibility of the instrument.

Thanks for your time. Stay safe and happy picking.


Mar 7, 2021 - 6:47:05 AM

DIV

USA

5507 posts since 8/18/2004

Congrats on a nice get and a fun project. Chance of finding the exact neck for your pot is pretty slim. I once tried to hunt down the original tenor neck of a converted TB4 I once had and worked backwards: asked the previous owner, then the neck maker....I gave up soon after that. Also, I’d suggest contacting Jim Mills and asking him. If he doesn’t have it, he may know where to look or worst case scenario be able to get you a very similar neck albeit, not matching FON.

Good luck and please keep us updated!

Edited by - DIV on 03/07/2021 06:48:19

Mar 7, 2021 - 6:50:58 AM

2113 posts since 1/4/2009
Online Now

I did a similar search for my 1930 style ones original neck. I was thinking it would be cool to find one of the same style, never expecting to find the exact neck. But in a few months I found one, bought it and when it arrived it had the same batch number written in pencil on the bottom of the neck. I contacted the seller with a picture of my converted banjo, and he remembers converting it in the late 60s. So sure enough I ended up finding my orginal neck! So maybe try posting pictures of the banjo as you received it and perhaps you'll find the luthier who converted it. Sure your banjo is way rarer than mine, but you might get lucky !

Edited by - kyleb on 03/07/2021 07:02:09

Mar 7, 2021 - 7:54:15 AM

6 posts since 5/29/2012

DIV and kyleb thanks for the interest gents. I know it will be a needle in a haystack search, but I figured I might as well try. I have consulted with many collectors already (Jim Mills, Steve Huber, and others) and they're on the lookout. My banjo had been converted many decades ago by Frank Neat by one of the first owners. Then along the way, one of those owners sold the tenor neck separate from the banjo before it ultimately wound up in Sammy Shelor's hands, two other collectors, and then my own. In the end, the tenor neck is a "nice to have" since the banjo is "known" and certified as the real deal thanks to some great record keeping on the part of previous owners.

Thanks again for your interest!

Mar 7, 2021 - 12:46:27 PM

DIV

USA

5507 posts since 8/18/2004

Very cool...you’re off to a much better start than I thought based on your first post. Keep this thread updated please!

Mar 7, 2021 - 4:03 PM

2113 posts since 1/4/2009
Online Now

It's got to be hanging on somebody's wall right now! Good luck

Mar 15, 2021 - 6:36:42 AM

DIV

USA

5507 posts since 8/18/2004

quote:
Originally posted by kyleb

It's got to be hanging on somebody's wall right now! Good luck


I agree!  And the walls with the most tenor and plectrum necks that I know of are those at Jim Mills’ house!  You can see glimpses on his website.

http://jimmillsbanjos.com

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.125