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Feb 27, 2021 - 1:14:48 PM
5595 posts since 12/20/2005

I have a Weymann Style A Plectrum.
One of my favorite banjo's.
I recall a thread about a Gibson plectrum which someone grafted a section of wood to make it a 5-string.
It turned out very nice. You had to really look at it closely to see the additional piece of wood where it was joined.
The degree of difficulty to do that must have been almost immeasurable.

I know it would be putting more time and effort than the instrument is worth. That's ok.
Just wondering if any of you have done this.
If so, how did you go about it ?

Thank You

Feb 27, 2021 - 2:10:39 PM

2113 posts since 1/4/2009

Bird snider does this kind of work look him up. He's done a few old Gibson plectrum necks and has his own process where you end up with the neck being mostly original.

Feb 27, 2021 - 2:11:56 PM
like this

beegee

USA

22277 posts since 7/6/2005

It's a matter of grafting new wood onto the side of the neck and fingerboard, refretting. IMO, it would be easier, just as cost-effective, more aesthethically-acceptable and more of a value-enhancement to make a copy 5-string neck, giving you the option of switching from plectrum to 5-string at will.

Edited by - beegee on 02/27/2021 14:12:38

Feb 27, 2021 - 5:22:48 PM
like this

Bill Rogers (Moderator)

USA

24584 posts since 6/25/2005

quote:
Originally posted by beegee

It's a matter of grafting new wood onto the side of the neck and fingerboard, refretting. IMO, it would be easier, just as cost-effective, more aesthethically-acceptable and more of a value-enhancement to make a copy 5-string neck, giving you the option of switching from plectrum to 5-string at will.


And meaning that an all-original plectrum could be restored to existence.

Feb 27, 2021 - 6:29:51 PM

8385 posts since 8/28/2013

I totally agree with Mr. Gaddis and Mr. Rogers.

There's simply no decent reason I can think of for ruining an original neck when it can be saved for a return of the banjo to the original configuration if required or desired. It's not even cost effective to change a plectrum neck, because to make it look right, the added wood of the neck has to be perfectly matched, and everything has to be refinished. A new fretboard would also need to be made to the new width. By the time all is said and done, you might just as well make a whole new neck.

One other thing that would need some consideration would be how that crazy metal Weymann neck brace would affect the geometry of any modifications to the original neck.

Feb 27, 2021 - 8:31:42 PM

5595 posts since 12/20/2005

I like working with wood and I enjoy a challenge.
It was fun to entertain the notion of doing this.
But I don't think I will give this one a go.
I appreciate your thoughts.

Leslie

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