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Jan 20, 2021 - 5:47:10 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

14735 posts since 9/27/2007
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A friend told me to look them up. There was a murder hornet thread a while ago. Has anyone seen these?

The cow killer. Sounds nasty!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dasymutilla_occidentalis

Jan 20, 2021 - 6:44:08 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

14735 posts since 9/27/2007
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Dasymutilla occidentalis (female).jpg

I thought he was talking about a band! They're in the States! They really are a wasp.

Edited by - bubbalouie on 01/20/2021 18:54:21

Jan 20, 2021 - 7:02:49 PM
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Ciao

Mali

3116 posts since 5/15/2011

Thanks Bob, interesting insect!

Unusual to parasitise their own Order (bees/ants/wasps). The parasitic wasps I'm familiar with lay eggs in spiders or Lepidoptera (butterfly/moth) caterpillars.

Jan 20, 2021 - 7:22:33 PM
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RonR

USA

1763 posts since 11/29/2012

I'm on the east coast and I'm not familiar with them. We do have plenty of cicada killers. Once they establish a territory, they stay there for decades.

Jan 20, 2021 - 7:26:41 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

14735 posts since 9/27/2007
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When I lived in Alberta I went to Dinosaur Provincial Park. There were fossils just laying on the ground!

We went in a cave/overhang & buddy flipped a rock & there were baby scorpions under it.

https://albertaparks.ca/parks/south/dinosaur-pp/information-facilities/nearby-attractions-campgrounds/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paruroctonus_boreus

Edited by - bubbalouie on 01/20/2021 19:27:47

Jan 20, 2021 - 7:45:37 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

14735 posts since 9/27/2007
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The lowest recorded temperature in Brooks Alberta was *-43.6 F.

Scorpions & prickly pear cactus live there.

Edited by - bubbalouie on 01/20/2021 19:46:14

Jan 21, 2021 - 7:22:39 AM
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DRH

USA

591 posts since 5/29/2018

Velvet ants are a common sight in the southeastern US. I've heard people call them ant wasps, ant bees, cow killers. Nobody seems to know much about them other than the horrible sting.

I've never seen a male. The females seem to like using asphalt or concrete paths and that is where I usually see them. Velvet ants are tough. I can stomp on one with my boot and when I lift my foot the little devil just resumes walking. Scraping or grinding with a boot sole will break them in half but I've never been able to squish one.

Jan 21, 2021 - 11:42:28 AM
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6401 posts since 9/5/2006

they are tough and the female sting will make you howl.... feels like you hand or foot is in a pot of boiling water ,,, we have seen a few around here but its rare.

Jan 21, 2021 - 12:52:35 PM
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Bill Rogers (Moderator)

USA

24383 posts since 6/25/2005

When I was a kid in Oklahoma they were endemic. We just stayed away from them when playing in the yard.

Jan 21, 2021 - 5:50:48 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

14735 posts since 9/27/2007
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I have a fig tree. I may have got a half doz figs over the years I've had it. Ha! Ha! It's in a container & it's hard to kill.

It came as a stick with a few roots in an ice cream tub. The lady said her Italian friend gave it to her & it thrived on neglect. We were having a big party & I tucked it somewhere safe, Forgot about it.

It sat out all winter with no drainage!  It looked pretty sad but I planted it in a gallon pot. It grew!

I moved it up to a plastic washtub & last fall we planted into an even bigger pot. I've air layered a few sprouts to give away.

There's lots of people around here that have productive trees. A guy said that eating a fresh ripe fig is like eating a bag of jam!

They are pollinated by wasps!

https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/85340/fig-pollination-incredible-and-probably-results-you-eating-mummified-wasps

Jan 21, 2021 - 6:58:21 PM
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RonR

USA

1763 posts since 11/29/2012

I had a fig tree given to me, but it didn't make it. An old friend stops by every year with a bag of figs from his tree.

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