Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

801
Banjo Lovers Online


Page: 1  2   Last Page (2) 

Jan 20, 2021 - 8:17:31 AM
likes this

heavy5

USA

1528 posts since 11/3/2016

I've been messing w/ acoustic instruments , mostly banjos , for about 60 yrs & have developed a respect for their care & treatment so when I see inappropriate care someone has done , even unknowingly , it flips me out .
Wife & I enjoy watching Woodsongs on RFD TV when there is some music we enjoy & it's announcer who does a good job & is also a folksinger .
On the last program he was singing as is usual to open the show & playing a gold plated what appeared to be a beautiful custom made open back 5 string .
Half way up the neck between the heel & 5th string peg was screwed into the side of the neck a hardware store screw eye (maybe 1/2" opening) to hold the strap w/ its metal clip on .
Now maybe it wasn't his banjo & he had nothing to w/ the screw eye plus if it is his , he has every right to do to it what he wants .
But it was difficult for me to accept that alteration . Kinda like someone putting mud flaps on their new Porsche 911 .  He ends every show w/ a little talk on his front porch , banjo in hand , which is grossly out of tune . Oh well ,I know , I'm picky !


 

Edited by - heavy5 on 01/20/2021 09:03:41

Jan 20, 2021 - 8:25:57 AM
like this

15088 posts since 12/2/2005

Dollars to donuts that banjo was a long-neck. The long-neck players back during the Great Folk Music Scare of the late 1950s - early 1960s had a penchant for attaching their straps that way.

Jan 20, 2021 - 8:26:54 AM
like this

5955 posts since 9/21/2007

"Folk singer" is the key, he is likely emulating Pete Seeger who did the same upon discovery that his long neck banjo was neck heavy.

Jan 20, 2021 - 8:29:45 AM
like this

5955 posts since 9/21/2007

Yep, complete with capo permanently clamped on the third fret.

 

Jan 20, 2021 - 8:31:53 AM
like this
Players Union Member

Eric A

USA

1044 posts since 10/15/2019
Online Now

Jens Kruger plays very expensive custom Deering banjos, yet on his latest cooking show he stopped picking, set his banjo perched precariously on a kitchen chair, and went and stirred the noodles. I almost died.

Edited by - Eric A on 01/20/2021 08:32:27

Jan 20, 2021 - 8:40:58 AM

heavy5

USA

1528 posts since 11/3/2016

I had one of these Vega Seeger banjos purchased new in the 60's (w/o screw eye) & eventually traded it back to it's original seller for a new D28 which I wish I had kept .

Jan 20, 2021 - 9:25:04 AM
likes this

452 posts since 7/28/2016

Jens Kruger has a cooking show ?

Jan 20, 2021 - 10:13:03 AM
like this

KCJones

USA

1353 posts since 8/30/2012

I think the obsession with keeping things "all original and mint condition", and the focus on "resale value", is a fairly modern one driven by collectors rather than musicians.

If I have a dirt driveway and mud gets on my porsche fenders, I'm gonna put mud flaps on it.

Jan 20, 2021 - 10:40:56 AM

1417 posts since 10/5/2006

quote:
Originally posted by gbisignani

Jens Kruger has a cooking show ?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TCVLdtIZ4fU

Jan 20, 2021 - 10:54:59 AM
Players Union Member

Eric A

USA

1044 posts since 10/15/2019
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by gbisignani

Jens Kruger has a cooking show ?


Jens and Uwe do a one hour music show Friday and Saturday nights at 7 eastern, and the cooking show is Sundays, I think 1 eastern.  On Youtube, and the older ones are all on there as well.  Very entertaining.  Those guys are a hoot.

Jan 20, 2021 - 11:28:23 AM

410 posts since 7/20/2013

I mostly agree with you about instrument abuse, Bob, but the guys above are correct about the screw eye. It's a traditional modification; and if Pete did it, it's perfectly acceptable for the rest of us to follow.wink

Jan 20, 2021 - 11:28:31 AM
like this

rcc56

USA

3327 posts since 2/20/2016

quote:Originally posted by KCJonesI think the obsession with keeping things "all original and mint condition", and the focus on "resale value", is a fairly modern one driven by collectors rather than musicians.

If I have a dirt driveway and mud gets on my porsche fenders, I'm gonna put mud flaps on it.

 

There's a lot of truth in this.

As a repair person, I think I can safely say that any fretted instrument that is played will need new frets sooner or later. All Martin guitars will eventually need a new bridge, because the original will split, sooner or later. We all know about "zinc pest" and cracked flanges on the old Mastertones. And every year, more celluloid pickguards on old Gibson mandolins give up the ghost.

And I actually remember a time, very long ago, when an expertly refinished instrument would bring more than a similar one with an original finish in really bad condition. I don't think we'll see that again, though.

I believe in doing the necessary work to keep an instrument playable, while still maintaining originality as much as is reasonably possible. A lot of that is up to the owner. An instrument that is well cared for will need less work than one that is treated casually.

And I cringe at "mojo," which to me is a code word for instrument abuse and neglect.

I just did $700 worth of work, discounted, on a couple of modern era Gibson instruments- one a 25 year old mandolin, the other a 20 year old acoustic guitar. I told the owner that most of the instruments I see that are 3 or 4 times older are in better shape, and that he would eventually have to replace his instruments if he didn't take better care of them. You can only patch them back together so many times before they ultimately give up the ghost.

And yes, it is a joy to see a fine old instrument that is in truly excellent condition, and maintains most of its original parts. And I think these now rather rare birds should command a premium price. But that doesn't mean that a well cared for instrument that has moderate wear and has had a new nut, bridge, or frets installed should be looked at with a lot of criticism. "If you were that old, you'd show some signs of wear and tear too."

And a long-neck banjo is a challenge to balance with a standard neck strap. But perhaps someone can eventually come up with a better way to make it work than a screw eye.

Happy picking, y'all.

Edited by - rcc56 on 01/20/2021 11:30:55

Jan 20, 2021 - 11:28:57 AM

452 posts since 7/28/2016

thanks...I just looked at one...they seem to know what they're doing in the kitchen as well as on stage !

Jan 20, 2021 - 11:39:28 AM
like this

56658 posts since 12/14/2005

quote:
Originally posted by rcc56

quote:Originally posted by KCJonesI think the obsession with keeping things "all original and mint condition", and the focus on "resale value", is a fairly modern one driven by collectors rather than musicians.

If I have a dirt driveway and mud gets on my porsche fenders, I'm gonna put mud flaps on it.

 

There's a lot of truth in this.

As a repair person, I think I can safely say that any fretted instrument that is played will need new frets sooner or later. All Martin guitars will eventually need a new bridge, because the original will split, sooner or later. We all know about "zinc pest" and cracked flanges on the old Mastertones. And every year, more celluloid pickguards on old Gibson mandolins give up the ghost.

And I actually remember a time, very long ago, when an expertly refinished instrument would bring more than a similar one with an original finish in really bad condition. I don't think we'll see that again, though.

I believe in doing the necessary work to keep an instrument playable, while still maintaining originality as much as is reasonably possible. A lot of that is up to the owner. An instrument that is well cared for will need less work than one that is treated casually.

And I cringe at "mojo," which to me is a code word for instrument abuse and neglect.

I just did $700 worth of work, discounted, on a couple of modern era Gibson instruments- one a 25 year old mandolin, the other a 20 year old acoustic guitar. I told the owner that most of the instruments I see that are 3 or 4 times older are in better shape, and that he would eventually have to replace his instruments if he didn't take better care of them. You can only patch them back together so many times before they ultimately give up the ghost.

And yes, it is a joy to see a fine old instrument that is in truly excellent condition, and maintains most of its original parts. And I think these now rather rare birds should command a premium price. But that doesn't mean that a well cared for instrument that has moderate wear and has had a new nut, bridge, or frets installed should be looked at with a lot of criticism.
"If you were that old, you'd show some signs of wear and tear too."

And a long-neck banjo is a challenge to balance with a standard neck strap. But perhaps someone can eventually come up with a better way to make it work than a screw eye.

Happy picking, y'all.


Sophia Loren, for example:

  

Jan 20, 2021 - 11:42:22 AM
like this

3612 posts since 5/29/2011

I remember a fellow in Roanoke, Virginia who would sand the finish off every new mandolin he got and refinish it. Poorly, too, I might add. But he swore that it made them sound better. To me it made them sound worse. But maybe I don't know anything about mandolins.

Mike,

Sophia Loren, Ann-Margret, and Raquel Wlech are three women that have aged as gracefully as anyone I have ever seen.

Edited by - Culloden on 01/20/2021 11:46:13

Jan 20, 2021 - 11:48:43 AM
likes this

647 posts since 6/6/2007

Yep, Pete did the eyebolt on several longnecks, dating back to at least the early Fifties and the modified Orpheum No. 1 he played then as a member of The Weavers.

Steve

Edited by - DH#52 on 01/20/2021 11:52:42

Jan 20, 2021 - 12:01:10 PM

rcc56

USA

3327 posts since 2/20/2016

quote:
Originally posted by Culloden

I remember a fellow in Roanoke, Virginia who would sand the finish off every new mandolin he got and refinish it. Poorly, too, I might add. But he swore that it made them sound better. To me it made them sound worse. But maybe I don't know anything about mandolins.

Mike,

Sophia Loren, Ann-Margret, and Raquel Wlech are three women that have aged as gracefully as anyone I have ever seen.


Well Mark, if they were Gibson mandolins made during certain periods, it might not have hurt if he had done a better job.  Some of them had enough lacquer on them for 3 or 4 instruments.

And I agree about the ladies, even if they had a little help along the way.

And unless something has recently changed, Emmylou is still a knockout also.

Jan 20, 2021 - 12:21:43 PM
like this

798 posts since 1/28/2013

At least he did'nt drill holes in the peg head, to rig up those levers that raise and lower the string pitch.

Jan 20, 2021 - 2:09:05 PM
likes this

heavy5

USA

1528 posts since 11/3/2016

quote:
Originally posted by Culloden

I remember a fellow in Roanoke, Virginia who would sand the finish off every new mandolin he got and refinish it. Poorly, too, I might add. But he swore that it made them sound better. To me it made them sound worse. But maybe I don't know anything about mandolins. 

Mike,

Sophia Loren, Ann-Margret, and Raquel Wlech are three women that have aged as gracefully as anyone I have ever seen.


There are , I believe true stories about things Frank Wakefield did to his Loar F5 such as baking it in an oven to dry out the wood but not quite hot enough to loosen the glue and also painting it red w/ a brush which I saw at a fest many years ago . Don't know if the bake was before or after the red paint ? He played at a local fest in Lodi NY abut 3 yrs ago & in his mandolin workshop the Loar still sounded incredible (refinished).  Frank was in his day , a highly respected mandolin player who do anything Monroe played & just as well ! I believe he currently resides in upstate NY .

And Sophia Loren , I remember her climbimg out of the water into a boat w/ her wet blouse --- yikes O mighty !!

Edited by - heavy5 on 01/20/2021 14:23:48

Jan 20, 2021 - 4:30:08 PM

180 posts since 3/16/2008

I'm forever grateful to now know of the Krueger Brothers cooking show. Watching Food Notes now!

Jan 21, 2021 - 6:48:58 AM

1602 posts since 7/4/2009

I heard Pete Seeger admit in an interview that he didn't take good care of his instruments. In addition to the eyebolt, he also glued down his bridge, and kept it on the banjo even after it wore through the drum.

Jan 21, 2021 - 7:03:13 AM
likes this

2515 posts since 2/10/2013

I replace parts on instruments. But I keep them and sell original parts when I sell the instruments. That includes cases. Some individuals buy instruments as investments and don't even play them. Being difficult to obtain or classic old instruments seems to make them more desirable and more expensive.

I like a lot of the high quality instruments small shops are making. They make them to the buyers specifications. Type wood, dimensions, and more. This applies to more than banjos.

Jan 21, 2021 - 11:04:43 AM

3612 posts since 5/29/2011

quote:
Originally posted by jan dupree

At least he did'nt drill holes in the peg head, to rig up those levers that raise and lower the string pitch.


Ummm...

I have to confess. I've done that.

Oops.

Jan 21, 2021 - 11:10:32 AM
likes this

798 posts since 1/28/2013

I think even Earl drilled holes in his Peghead at some point, in addition to thinning the neck profile on his original Granada neck which warped afterward, even though Gibson advised him not to do it. I have probably committed a crime also by replacing the almost new original  neck, which was on my Huber Kalamazoo, with a wider one made by an independent Luthier, which says Gibson on the peghead. In addition to replacing the metal armrest with a wooden one, and changing the Huber bridge, with a wider spaced Snuffy Smith bridge. Judge not, less Ye be Judged. 

Edited by - jan dupree on 01/21/2021 11:18:38

Jan 21, 2021 - 3:59:26 PM
likes this

heavy5

USA

1528 posts since 11/3/2016

Monroe himself defaced the peghead of his F5 w/ his jackknife when he was upset w/ the Gibson company .

Edited by - heavy5 on 01/21/2021 16:00:20

Jan 21, 2021 - 4:04:46 PM
likes this

1602 posts since 7/4/2009

quote:
Originally posted by heavy5

Monroe himself defaced the peghead of his F5 w/ his jackknife when he was upset w/ the Gibson company .


And it looked incredibly cool.

Page: 1  2   Last Page (2) 

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.234375