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Jan 18, 2021 - 7:26:05 PM

wadeee

USA

25 posts since 10/18/2020

I stained a neck, rim and resonator and was curious about the next steps after staining. Do you scotchbrite it to pop the grain or sand with 220? 320? 400? I notice when sanding after staining that if I sand with 320, I sand through the stain but if using Grey Scotchbrite, I don't sand through and it looks amazing and pops well but I'm concerned that the smoothness of it will affect adhesion of the sanding sealer. Will it?

Jan 19, 2021 - 8:35:54 AM

3613 posts since 5/29/2011
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It probably will not affect spray-on sanding sealer. I don't have much experience with the brush-on type so I can't say how that will work.

I use spray type sanding sealer. I stain, sand VERY lightly with 400 grit to smooth down the raised fibers, then spray on sanding sealer. I steel wool that down smooth then use a Microfiber pad to get rid of steel dust. Then I apply the lacquer.

That may not be the best way but it works OK for me.

Edited by - Culloden on 01/19/2021 08:42:41

Jan 19, 2021 - 8:43:47 AM
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beegee

USA

22187 posts since 7/6/2005

smooth with the scotchbrite or bronze wool, wipe with a tack rag and then apply several coats of sanding sealer before wet-sanding. Then apply your clear coat. You don't have to sand for adhesion between lacquer coats, but you need to sand to level if you have orange-peel, etc.

Jan 19, 2021 - 7:08:28 PM

wadeee

USA

25 posts since 10/18/2020

But what to sand with before the sanding sealer is the question..Any advise?

Jan 19, 2021 - 9:32:50 PM
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rcc56

USA

3327 posts since 2/20/2016

The way I was taught is to sand to 320 before staining, and make sure that no scratches are left. A quick wipe with naphtha can help to reveal hard to see scratches. Then use an alcohol or oil stain.  I've only used alcohol stains.  Then sealer coats, then sand.  I have generally not found it necessary to sand again between the alcohol stain and the sealer.  I may have had to kiss the surface lightly with 400 a couple of times over the years, but I dis-remember for sure.  Any sanding at all at that point is risky.

If you used a water stain, it will raise the grain. You might be able to knock it down with 400 without going through. Or not.

Edited by - rcc56 on 01/19/2021 21:49:12

Jan 20, 2021 - 4:47:59 AM
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4582 posts since 11/20/2004

I may rub over stain with a piece of denim to smooth it, but not sandpaper. Sanding thru stain is usually challenging to make invisible in my experience.

Jan 20, 2021 - 12:11:46 PM
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104 posts since 7/5/2010

No, your smoothness will not affect the adhesion of the sanding sealer. You can always test on a scrap piece.

Jan 20, 2021 - 5:49:08 PM
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2281 posts since 2/7/2008

I don't think I've ever sanded after staining and before applying sanding sealer.

What's happening that's making you want to sand after staining?

Jan 31, 2021 - 9:23:06 AM

wadeee

USA

25 posts since 10/18/2020

I used the grey scotchbrite after staining, it seems very smooth, popped the grain and looks great, my only concern is whether the finish is too smooth for good adhesion of the sanding sealer. I just don't want to sand because I know it will go through the stain. But, I also want good adhesion. So what do I do?

Jan 31, 2021 - 11:01:10 AM
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139 posts since 7/14/2017

Use your Scotchbrite! You won't make the wood too smooth to accept shellac sanding sealer just by polishing it up with abrasive.

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