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Dec 5, 2020 - 2:26:49 AM
92 posts since 10/20/2016

Looking at my Tailpiece it has a screw just below the string holding hook. It seems to have no affect on anything when screwed in or all the way out, what is the screw for and should it be in or out.
Any advice appreciated

imgur.com/He9ojfo

Dec 5, 2020 - 2:41:57 AM

278 posts since 3/19/2018

It looks like a tailpiece height Adjustment screw maybe faulty
whats the make and model? you need to take off the tailpiece and post pics.

Dec 5, 2020 - 2:45:13 AM

120 posts since 10/18/2020

@Wizhunter photos would probably help tremendously I can not answer your question but I am sure some of the people on here with more knowledge then myself will answer at some point but seriously I would post a photo of what you are talking about the three banjos i have does not nave anything like you are describing

Dec 5, 2020 - 4:12:26 AM
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Emiel

Austria

9694 posts since 1/22/2003

The posted link shows this photo:

It looks like a screw that determines the tailpiece angle and consequently the pressure of the strings on the bridge.

Dec 5, 2020 - 4:50:25 AM

92 posts since 10/20/2016

It's a Ozark banjo and don't know the model number and can't find one on the banjo. And parlour player it took me long enough to get it back on so don't really want to take it off again. I have another tailpiece which is universal apparently but it won't attach to the banjo because of the Truss Rod nut which is in the way. I think they call it a Clam Shell or something and it's a pity cause i quite like the look of it.

Dec 5, 2020 - 6:14 AM
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beegee

USA

22066 posts since 7/6/2005

It's to adjust downward pressure on the strings behind the tailpiece.

What happens is that on inexpensive banjos such as this, they sorta throw generic parts together with not a lot of engineering details. I'm thinking(without actually seeing this banjo)that the tailpiece bolts extends downward through a small hole in the flange?

It would not be inappropriate to use another tailpiece, even if you have to cobble something together to attach it, as long as it's solid and secure. You could bend a mounting screw for a clamshell tailpiece. You could also obtain a longer screw with matching threads. It wouldn't have to have a knurled head. You could use any machine screw with a hex head or slotted head or Phillips head, whatever you can find with matching threads.

Dec 5, 2020 - 6:34:58 AM

92 posts since 10/20/2016

I am in the process of getting a new beginner banjo which i should have in the next few days, and depending how i take to learning it i have my heart set on a Deering Goodtime Resonator Banjo. That will be sometime after Christmas. Thanks for the advice beegee and the rest of you, i really appreciate it.

Dec 5, 2020 - 7:30:43 AM
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13596 posts since 10/30/2008

Timothy, the last thing you need to worry about as a beginner is that screw! Play on!

I daresay most players of Gibson Mastertones with Grover Presto tailpieces have a similar screw in the tailpiece, which they remove and throw away.

For some better quality (stouter) tailpieces, that screw actually does something useful and as BeeGee said it permits adjustment of the leading edge of the tailpiece closer to, or farther from the plane of the head, to increase or decrease downward pressure of the strings on the bridge. Which can affect tone.

Dec 6, 2020 - 6:42:56 AM

92 posts since 10/20/2016

The Old Timer Thanks for the advice for which i am grateful. My new Banjo arrived about an hour ago so going to watch some Jim Pankey video's to help me learn. I need to toughen my fingertips again as i haven't played a string instrument for quite a while. Thanks again.

Tim

Dec 6, 2020 - 8:01:13 AM
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471 posts since 1/28/2011

quote:
Originally posted by The Old Timer

Timothy, the last thing you need to worry about as a beginner is that screw! Play on!

I daresay most players of Gibson Mastertones with Grover Presto tailpieces have a similar screw in the tailpiece, which they remove and throw away.

For some better quality (stouter) tailpieces, that screw actually does something useful and as BeeGee said it permits adjustment of the leading edge of the tailpiece closer to, or farther from the plane of the head, to increase or decrease downward pressure of the strings on the bridge. Which can affect tone.


I have three banjos with Presto tailpices.  That screw on all three does exactly what you say, raises or lowers the front of the tailpiece to increase or decrease the downward pressure of the strings on the bridge., and it does affect the tone, by a bunch.  Why would adjusting the screw work on all other tailpieces except a Presto?  The only problem with the screw on a Presto is the size.  You have to press the tailpiece down with your hand to take the pressure off the screw before you can turn it.

Dec 6, 2020 - 3:05:58 PM
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13596 posts since 10/30/2008

Dave, the Presto doesn't have a hinge at the 90 degree bend.

Dec 6, 2020 - 9:26:46 PM
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471 posts since 1/28/2011

quote:
Originally posted by The Old Timer

Dave, the Presto doesn't have a hinge at the 90 degree bend.


It doesn't need a hinge.  It just rocks over the top edge of the tension hoop.  If you push down on the top front of the Presto, the back rocks away from the side, relieving the pressure on the screw so you can adjust it. That probably wouldn't work if you had the tailpiece pulled down tight against the top of the tension hoop, but I set mine up so there is about 1/8" of space between the top of the tension hoop and the tailpiece

Edited by - latigo1 on 12/06/2020 21:30:32

Dec 7, 2020 - 4:28:47 AM

92 posts since 10/20/2016

Thanks to everyone for taking the time to help me. With your help i now know exactly how the tailpiece works. I have decided to keep the original tailpiece and have put the Clamshell one in a drawer. For a non-expensive Banjo it has been an Headache just learning about what does what. I have a few things winging their way to me like the picks advised on another post, some light gauge strings and a compensated bridge to help with tuning also a 5th String geared peg. I got my new Banjo yesterday, another non-expensive one which also needs a better bridge as the one supplied looks pants (Rubbish). Thanks for all your help it's much appreciated.

Dec 7, 2020 - 3:17:22 PM
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Owen

Canada

7424 posts since 6/5/2011

Fwiw, this was posted over in the Hawktail Tailpiece Height thread:  
banjonews.com/2010-07/more_str...gles.html

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