Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

552
Banjo Lovers Online


Page: 1  2   Last Page (2) 

Nov 25, 2020 - 10:50:33 PM
72 posts since 10/11/2019

I think this perch pole mark is a retailers mark plus I can't find any info on H. Sykes. It is well built and has earmarks of a Temlett. I am curious what some of you may think. Thanks Bill




 

Nov 25, 2020 - 10:52:39 PM

72 posts since 10/11/2019

Here are some additional photos. Thanks, Bill




 

Nov 26, 2020 - 12:29:51 AM
likes this

1506 posts since 4/25/2007
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by wannabe picker

Here are some additional photos. Thanks, Bill


Personally I don't see the Temlett connection Bill. The rim bracket bolts look similar to some I've seen on Spencers banjos.  

Nov 26, 2020 - 12:47:13 AM

72 posts since 10/11/2019

quote:
Originally posted by Stephen John Prior
quote:
Originally posted by wannabe picker

Here are some additional photos. Thanks, Bill


Personally I don't see the Temlett connection Bill. The rim bracket bolts look similar to some I've seen on Spencers banjos.  


Thank you John. I understand you know your Temletts.

Nov 26, 2020 - 12:56:14 AM

1506 posts since 4/25/2007
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by wannabe picker
quote:
Originally posted by Stephen John Prior
quote:
Originally posted by wannabe picker

Here are some additional photos. Thanks, Bill


Personally I don't see the Temlett connection Bill. The rim bracket bolts look similar to some I've seen on Spencers banjos.  


Thank you John. I understand you know your Temletts.

 

I'll see if I can get some photos for you later today.

Nov 26, 2020 - 1:27:23 AM

72 posts since 10/11/2019

I think you're right John. Here are a couple of photos I found of a Spenser. Only differences that I can see are screws instead of bolts for the hook shoes and the head stock design. Fret board is nearly identical.

https://classic-banjo.ning.com/forum/topics/richard-spencer-antique-fretless-banjo-for-sale-at-low-price




Edited by - wannabe picker on 11/26/2020 01:29:57

Nov 26, 2020 - 1:57:03 AM

72 posts since 10/11/2019

...and here is what appears to be a much more modern Spenser and the head stock is nearly identical to mine. Thanks soooooooooooo very much for that info. You people are such a fantastic source for information. I don't know how to thank you enough.


 

Nov 26, 2020 - 2:35:24 AM

1506 posts since 4/25/2007
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by wannabe picker

...and here is what appears to be a much more modern Spenser and the head stock is nearly identical to mine. Thanks soooooooooooo very much for that info. You people are such a fantastic source for information. I don't know how to thank you enough.


Sorry but no. Richard (Dick) Spencer died in 1915. 

Nov 26, 2020 - 3:32:15 AM
like this

1671 posts since 1/13/2012

quote:
Originally posted by wannabe picker

...and here is what appears to be a much more modern Spenser and the head stock is nearly identical to mine. Thanks soooooooooooo very much for that info. You people are such a fantastic source for information. I don't know how to thank you enough.


I know very little about English banjos, but I'd guess that the Asian-built banjo pictured above has no connection to British-built Spencer banjos. Just happens to have the same name.

Nov 26, 2020 - 3:50:56 AM
likes this

1506 posts since 4/25/2007
Online Now

Here is a Spencer I have awaiting appropriate tuners and tailpiece. The Richard Spencer shop turned out a great many banjos. Most were made for retail by others but occasionally they turn up with his own stamp, probably made to sell to his students. Check out the way the dowel is stamped in particular and of course the rim bracket (shoe) bolt.


Nov 26, 2020 - 4:13:25 AM
likes this

194 posts since 5/25/2015

Is that an old legal parchment that they used for head? It looks like some sort of property deed. I suppose these would have been made from similar material at the time and worked ok?

Nov 26, 2020 - 4:42:36 AM

72 posts since 10/11/2019

quote:
Originally posted by Stephen John Prior

Here is a Spencer I have awaiting appropriate tuners and tailpiece. The Richard Spencer shop turned out a great many banjos. Most were made for retail by others but occasionally they turn up with his own stamp, probably made to sell to his students. Check out the way the dowel is stamped in particular and of course the rim bracket (shoe) bolt.


Very nice. Is that your work so far? I don't have this banjo in hand yet, probably next week sometime. Then I can examine it more closely. No other mark is visible in the sellers photos, but your head stock is a  dead ringer for mine. Thank you very much.

Nov 26, 2020 - 7:06:42 AM

5833 posts since 9/21/2007
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by gentrixuk

Is that an old legal parchment that they used for head? It looks like some sort of property deed. I suppose these would have been made from similar material at the time and worked ok?


Using old legal parchment is a technique that a lot of antique dealers used to (and perhaps still) use to add age and presumed value to otherwise low valued items. In the days before the Internet info on antiques was not easy to get so antique dealers took advantage of of that.  
 

it is possible that the use was innocent, but I don't put anything past antique dealers.  In the US, depending on what part you are in, everything gets turned into "Wild West" or "federal" artifacts. 

Nov 26, 2020 - 8:18:22 AM

72 posts since 10/11/2019

quote:
Originally posted by Joel Hooks
quote:
Originally posted by gentrixuk

Is that an old legal parchment that they used for head? It looks like some sort of property deed. I suppose these would have been made from similar material at the time and worked ok?


Using old legal parchment is a technique that a lot of antique dealers used to (and perhaps still) use to add age and presumed value to otherwise low valued items. In the days before the Internet info on antiques was not easy to get so antique dealers took advantage of of that.  
 

it is possible that the use was innocent, but I don't put anything past antique dealers.  In the US, depending on what part you are in, everything gets turned into "Wild West" or "federal" artifacts. 


Yes to both of you. As I first looked at It I wondered if the parchment was worth more than the banjo. lol,Bill

I may patch it, and frame it.

Nov 26, 2020 - 9:08:08 AM
likes this

56460 posts since 12/14/2005

Don't know about Temlett nor Spencer, but I love those pegs!

Nov 26, 2020 - 12:56 PM
likes this

194 posts since 5/25/2015

There used to be a music shop in Leeds called Sykes, but I can't find a mention of H Sykes anywhere. Here is a photo of the shop.


 

Nov 26, 2020 - 1:00:42 PM
like this

5833 posts since 9/21/2007
Online Now

There was an A. P. Sykes Music (see attached below).


Edited by - Joel Hooks on 11/26/2020 13:01:32

Nov 26, 2020 - 2:07:18 PM

72 posts since 10/11/2019

Thank you Mark & Joel. Very cool.

Nov 28, 2020 - 1:45:10 AM
likes this

22 posts since 2/18/2004

Harry Sykes was a banjo performer and teacher in Leeds and gave his address as 49 Albion Street which was the music shop in the photo. Possibly Henry Sykes (1867-1943) who was the son of John William Sykes and a professional musician. There are some banjo arrangements by Harry Sykes at:

archive.org/details/BanjoBijou.../mode/2up

Nov 28, 2020 - 3:18:12 AM
likes this

194 posts since 5/25/2015

quote:
Originally posted by nickll

Harry Sykes was a banjo performer and teacher in Leeds and gave his address as 49 Albion Street which was the music shop in the photo. Possibly Henry Sykes (1867-1943) who was the son of John William Sykes and a professional musician. There are some banjo arrangements by Harry Sykes at:

archive.org/details/BanjoBijou.../mode/2up


That's great info. There is a mention of Harry Sykes as a teacher in this profile of Alfred Kirby.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.zither-banjo.org.uk/pages/Kirby2.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwiPuaCQjaXtAhVzoVwKHQ4SAlwQFjACegQIDBAB&usg=AOvVaw1__kday_J6fJg41BJV1lOm

So, do we think the banjo belonged to Harry Sykes, or was he maybe selling banjos with his stamp on to his students? Or perhaps he was well known enough to sell branded banjos through the family shop?

Nov 28, 2020 - 4:31:32 AM
likes this

22 posts since 2/18/2004

Appears to have been quite a well-known performer and I would guess they were for sale to the public through the Sykes shop or students at his American Banjo Studio. He was an agent for Bohee Clipper banjos in late 1880s

Nov 29, 2020 - 3:06:33 AM
likes this

1506 posts since 4/25/2007
Online Now

I sold a fretless a couple of months back with H SYKES stamps but imo made by Temlett. It appears to have been common practice for teachers to sell to students.


Nov 29, 2020 - 4:14:47 AM
likes this

m06

England

9531 posts since 10/5/2006
Online Now

The vellum that has been reused as a banjo head is a 17th century property indenture. In that period these documents were commonly drawn up where a major (usually remote) landowner was dividing a large holding in a parish and selling as parcels of land and property to the local yeoman farmers. and artisans.

I've been transcribing many, many of these in the course of my early Quaker research, with many more that I've photographed at the county archive and now on file awaiting transcribing and examination. The bold headings and standard format leap off the page as identifying what this document is. With my researcher's hat on can I request...

Please, please please, don't discard this vellum when you remove it to renovate your banjo. It is a valuable historical document and part of our heritage that belongs in the relevant county archive; even as a fragment/partial document. It will indicate in the first two lines which parish and county this indenture relates to. The details still legible in the document could be the key information and sole existing documentary evidence for identification of land/property for a future researcher. 

Edited by - m06 on 11/29/2020 04:29:11

Nov 29, 2020 - 4:46:55 AM
likes this

m06

England

9531 posts since 10/5/2006
Online Now

Actually a closer look at your photo and the calligraphic style (which on your vellum is easily readable) indicates this document is later than 17th century when documents were written in characteristic earlier archaic script. Your vellum is more likely late 18th or early 19th century. But the principles and my request remain the same. Part of the visible text mentions London; the Middlesex, Surrey and Kent county archives will have websites and contact details for their Head Archivist.

Here is a section of one of my complete 17th century indentures (1660) photographed with permission at the Somerset County Archive in Taunton for comparison.


 

Edited by - m06 on 11/29/2020 04:53:34

Nov 29, 2020 - 11:39:16 PM
likes this

72 posts since 10/11/2019

quote:
Originally posted by m06

Actually a closer look at your photo and the calligraphic style (which on your vellum is easily readable) indicates this document is later than 17th century when documents were written in characteristic earlier archaic script. Your vellum is more likely late 18th or early 19th century. But the principles and my request remain the same. Part of the visible text mentions London; the Middlesex, Surrey and Kent county archives will have websites and contact details for their Head Archivist.

Here is a section of one of my complete 17th century indentures (1660) photographed with permission at the Somerset County Archive in Taunton for comparison.


Hello Mike. That is all great information to have. Thanks for taking the time to share it. I definitely had already planned to preserve it. I'm not sure exactly sure how yet but the writing is so beautiful I would never toss it out. I may simply try to frame it in a glass frame just the way it comes off the banjo, just to preserve what's left of it. Thank you again Mike. Stay safe and well, Bill

Nov 29, 2020 - 11:42:18 PM

72 posts since 10/11/2019

quote:
Originally posted by Stephen John Prior

I sold a fretless a couple of months back with H SYKES stamps but imo made by Temlett. It appears to have been common practice for teachers to sell to students.


Wow Stephen. THAT IS A BEAUTY! 

Page: 1  2   Last Page (2) 

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.375