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Nov 23, 2020 - 5:41:16 PM
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2096 posts since 6/19/2014

How many of us are researching your family tree, and, if so, what have you found? In my case, I discovered a prison record for a young man who had been convicted of attempted beastiality. I was intrigued by the "attempted." It doesn't seem to me to be a very difficult crime to commit.

Nov 23, 2020 - 6:05:42 PM
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2647 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by Banjo Lefty

How many of us are researching your family tree, and, if so, what have you found? In my case, I discovered a prison record for a young man who had been convicted of attempted beastiality. I was intrigued by the "attempted." It doesn't seem to me to be a very difficult crime to commit.


It can be more difficult tan you'd imagine - especially if you are short like me......

my Dad traced our family tree bac a very long way, it turns out that my ancestors sailed across the North Sea from Norway to settle,in the UK.  I also have a great, great, great uncle Claude who headed over into your neck of the woods to become an actor in the silent movies.  The biggest stumbling block my dad had was his own mother - it turned out that one of our fairly recent (last 80 years) was born out of wedlock and my Granny simply would not admit to the fact because of the shame it had brought to the family.  It was only hard work and research that helped my dad get past thins dead end - inconceivable by today's way of thinking eh?

Nov 23, 2020 - 6:21:33 PM
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Paul R

Canada

13668 posts since 1/28/2010

On my Dad's side they were Irish Potato Famine people who came to Montreal. Prior to that someone went from France to Ireland, thus the French last name. Dad said his father was a "minstrel" who played banjo. He also played fiddle.

I don't know Mom's side prior to her father. He became the Director of the City of Montreal Fire Department. He was an Orangeman who married a Catholic. When he died (early Fifties) he had to get a dispensation to be buried in the Catholic cemetery on Mount Royal - and they couldn't enter by the main gates.

One of my daughter's boyfriends told her that his great-grandfather was the Director of the Montreal FD. She told him that her great-grandfather was, too. Then they looked at each other funny - until they realized that their grandfathers weren't the same person. Awkward moment.

Grandfather Carson rests beneath a tall, well kept headstone, joined by my parents, aunts, uncles, and cousins. Grandfather Rappell rests not far from there, but under a small stone, about the size of a brick, with a number on it, in a pauper's grave - Dad took me there once.




Nov 23, 2020 - 6:37:59 PM
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Brian T

Canada

17591 posts since 6/5/2008

We can document ( ! ) eight or nine generations back to blacksmiths in England.
They don't give a sweet rat's patootie who we are.
The End.

Nov 23, 2020 - 6:41:09 PM

Owen

Canada

7485 posts since 6/5/2011

quote:
Originally posted by Banjo Lefty

<snip>  I discovered a prison record for a young man who had been convicted of attempted beastiality. I was intrigued by the "attempted." It doesn't seem to me to be a very difficult crime to commit.


Even though I'll never understand "why," I suppose not everybody follows the "Don Cherry" thread, so I figure one of Paul's posts might  fit in about here: The first time I saw Utah Phillips, Saul Broudy backed him up on harmonica. Utah introduced him thusly: "Saul was doing animal husbandry at the University of Minnesota until they caught him at it."

Nov 23, 2020 - 7:16:56 PM

56500 posts since 12/14/2005

One of my ancestors lived long enough to produce offspring, before being hung for sheep stealing.

We are DISTANTLY related to the Haigs of Scotch whiskey fame, and Alexander Haig, , the United States Secretary of State under President Ronald Reagan and the White House chief of staff under presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford.

  

Nov 23, 2020 - 7:26:17 PM
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9799 posts since 8/22/2006

Mike I see the resemblance!!

Not to much into family trees. But I have planted a tree or two in my life time. No world shakers that I’m aware in our family but with my last name which rhymes with bones and starts with a J who knows. BUT we are the proud owner of the everyday saying “Keeping up with the Bones’” so I’m still waiting on my residual checks from each and everyone of you that says that without our family’s permission.

Edited by - 5B-Ranch on 11/23/2020 19:28:04

Nov 23, 2020 - 8:57:58 PM
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11235 posts since 1/15/2005

Recently found out my great great great grandmother on my mother's side was a revolutionary war hero (heroine) and had 22 children, after marring a Revolutionary War Captain at age 16. Most of the children lived, which was unusual in the 1700's and early 1800's.

Nov 23, 2020 - 9:03:50 PM
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343 posts since 10/4/2018

quote:
Originally posted by Banjo Lefty

How many of us are researching your family tree, and, if so, what have you found? In my case, I discovered a prison record for a young man who had been convicted of attempted beastiality. I was intrigued by the "attempted." It doesn't seem to me to be a very difficult crime to commit.


Chickens can be hard to catch sometimes, trust me  :D

Nov 23, 2020 - 11:03:07 PM
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Cyndy

USA

640 posts since 3/2/2010

For me, genealogical research is a passion and I spend many hours a week researching and writing. Too many, maybe. :)

One of my favorite finds is a series of New York City deeds from around 1800 where my husband’s female ancestor is a party. In one of them she becomes a trustee for her sister’s property to protect ownership. It strikes me she was pretty savvy. I think she left an unhappy marriage (her husband advertised for her return) and ended up running an oyster house.

Nov 23, 2020 - 11:18:19 PM
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chuckv97

Canada

54847 posts since 10/5/2013

My grandmother’s family on my Dad’s side were North Sea fishermen in the 1800's. One fall they ended up way north of Scotland when the weather turned and a storm swept them further asea. They had to spend the winter in Iceland.

Edited by - chuckv97 on 11/23/2020 23:19:42

Nov 24, 2020 - 12:06:11 AM
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m06

England

9553 posts since 10/5/2006

My dad used to talk about the living family he grew up among but hardly at all about those who had gone before. I met and knew his sister and his aunt who were the only close kin still alive when I was a kid. I guess grandparents are our natural connection to that past story and sadly both my paternal grandparents died before I was born. I knew little or nothing about anyone on that side of the family who lived before about 1890.

Some years ago I thought I'd do the research and I'm glad I did. Now I know where family are buried, have visited a few graves to pay my respect, I know what they did for work and where they lived. I believe that we all reach a point where we have an innate sense that we need that narrative. I now have half the story that helped to shape who I am.

What amazed me was, apart from record of birth marriage and death, how much tiny personal detail can be found in the historical record from 200+ years back. I came across an 1812 excise fine for my GGG grandfather detailing his overloaded cart, where he was stopped and how much he was fined. Also details of a pottery company that same relative had established in the last decade of the 18th century.

And, via newspaper reports, one event he was caught up in as a kid: when he was 14 he lived in an opencast mining area and gunpowder for the mining was regularly carted though the village where he lived. On one morning in 1785 a cart laden with 2 tonnes of gunpowder stopped outside a row of cottages. No-one knew for sure, but local witnesses assumed that on his break a spark from the carter's pipe set the whole load off. The resulting explosion flattened 14 cottages making many villagers temporarily homeless, damaging many more including blowing the windows out of the schoolhouse. They never recovered the remains of the carter or his young mate. The news reports formed a national request for financial aid that was also repeated in churches around the country.

Being aware of events that our ancestors were caught up in and no doubt stayed in their minds is a form of connection. Narrative.

Edited by - m06 on 11/24/2020 00:17:56

Nov 24, 2020 - 12:15:20 AM
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Paul R

Canada

13668 posts since 1/28/2010

quote:
Originally posted by 5B-Ranch

Mike I see the resemblance!!

Not to much into family trees. But I have planted a tree or two in my life time. No world shakers that I’m aware in our family but with my last name which rhymes with bones and starts with a J who knows. BUT we are the proud owner of the everyday saying “Keeping up with the Bones’” so I’m still waiting on my residual checks from each and everyone of you that says that without our family’s permission.


I didn't keep up with them - I married one.


 

Nov 24, 2020 - 1:31:05 AM
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m06

England

9553 posts since 10/5/2006

quote:
Originally posted by chuckv97

My grandmother’s family on my Dad’s side were North Sea fishermen in the 1800's. One fall they ended up way north of Scotland when the weather turned and a storm swept them further asea. They had to spend the winter in Iceland.


The words 'North Sea fishermen' don't begin to describe how tough that life was in the 1800's. Brutal.

Do you ever listen to shanties? Your family members would've sung some of those work songs most days of their working lives.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bp48yJbtq98

Edited by - m06 on 11/24/2020 01:42:36

Nov 24, 2020 - 3:02:56 AM
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396 posts since 9/6/2019
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Through other family member's searching, not mine, I have traced my dad's side of the family in the US dating back to the mid 1700's. On my mom's side, her grandfather immigrated from Scotland in the mid 1800's. It's hard to trace anything farther than that because he deserted the army during the civil war because he was ordered to kill unarmed prisoners and refused to do it. That led to him changing his name and moving to the other side of the state which, back then, may as well have been across the country.

Nov 24, 2020 - 3:12:29 AM
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OM45GE

USA

103224 posts since 11/7/2007

I didn’t have to do much research. There is a book on my father’s side of the family called “The Cogswells in America” that traces the family back to the 1600’s in the US and earlier in England. It was published early in the 1900’s. My grandfather is my most recent named ancestor in the book with my dad and his sister are mentioned as his children but not named.

My mother’s family has been in the US about as long. They were Scots who arrived here as indentured servants. The settled in Maine and the family history is well documented though not published in book form. 

It’s all sort of interesting, but I think it’s much more meaningful who you are as a person than who you’re related to. Like most of us, my ancestors and relatives include scoundrels and luminaries. 

Edited by - OM45GE on 11/24/2020 03:16:52

Nov 24, 2020 - 3:40:59 AM
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phb

Germany

2361 posts since 11/8/2010
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Like most people here I can trace back my family to the Thirty Year's War when most church registers were lost due to the war. On my dad's side there were mostly poor people that were yarn weavers. In two subsequent generations only one of ten and twelve, respectively, baptised children survived childhood. On my mother's side there is the typical Berlin mix of locals, Dutch, Polish and French immigrants. The Dutch were invited to help drain the boggy area, the French were Huguenots that were expelled from France and invited by the Prussian king to settle in his realm, the Polish just mixed in. They were also rather poor up until around the 1890s. We still own the home of my mother's family that was built in 1803. It's not a palace.

Nov 24, 2020 - 5:09:28 AM
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rinemb

USA

12905 posts since 5/24/2005

My wife's primary hobbie has been gen research. She began before computers and internet. old fashion letter writing, courthouse and library contacts: mail, visits, and digging...all over the country.]
After getting deep into her patriarchal, then she started on my family vine.
A few years ago, we made breakthroughs on her mother from Germany who was never told who her biological father was. We found out and went to France to meet her first cousin.

She has Dozens of ringed binders full, and dozens of boxes full of ancestry stuff.
And is a full active member of several gen websites in USA and Europe.

Her current project is to find my patriarchal dude who came to America in about 1750s. Much info on my family after that, but no one has found his home origin. Lazarus Rine. early records (not original claim Prussia) My wife may be close to busting that???

Brad

Nov 24, 2020 - 5:26:54 AM

kww

USA

914 posts since 6/21/2008

The only relatively well-known relative is Wyatt Earp, my third cousin, 4x removed. He is, oddly enough, my third cousin, 4x removed twice because his aunt Drucilla is my great-great-great-grandmother through both my mother and father.

Nov 24, 2020 - 6:12:10 AM
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wizofos

USA

5788 posts since 8/19/2012

My Dad's family is pretty well documented being on of the first German settlers (1846) in the hill country south of Austin. The Hoelscher/Buxkemper family is well documented in Texas lore. I have a book that is about 3" thick that documents all the known members and it is estimated that I have about 10,000 cousins world wide.
I started doing some investigation when this Covid thing started and I recall my Mother's Mother (My maternal grandmother) used to talk about being Kashubian and speaking kashubie. I always thought that we were Polish, but apparently the Kashubians are a separate culture in Poland and their language is one of the two official languages in Poland. The interesting thing is that my maternal Great-Grandmother supposedly was born in a covered wagon in Minnesota in February. She was a sickly child so the family turned around and went back to Chicago where from what I can tell they settled in a Kashubian area on the north side and attended a mainly Kashubian parish. This 'sickly' child only had one daughter (my grandmother) but had 5 husbands and even married her step-son and lived to 95. I have not been able to trace back farther than my Great-Grandmother on that side.

Nov 24, 2020 - 7:10:26 AM

2413 posts since 2/10/2013

I have never checked out my family lineage. My family said little about their relatives. All I knew was the fact my mother was originally Canadian and my father's family had emigrated from Germany. When my mothers relatives visited, they only spoke French. So I went fishing when they were around.

Before my sister took it to Chile, our attic contained a beautiful hand carved sled designed to carry a child. So there must have been a carpenter somewhere along the line.  Unfortunately I did not inherit that skill.

Edited by - Richard Hauser on 11/24/2020 07:11:04

Nov 24, 2020 - 8:00:55 AM
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73800 posts since 5/9/2007

My Mom's people moved here in the early 1900s.
My Great-Grandfather Thomas Underwood worked in our local granite quarry.

Dad's side came from the Port Clyde area for many generations,mostly the local Indian tribes with no records kept.








 

Nov 24, 2020 - 8:13:23 AM
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DC5

USA

16015 posts since 6/30/2015

quote:
Originally posted by Banjo Lefty

How many of us are researching your family tree, and, if so, what have you found? In my case, I discovered a prison record for a young man who had been convicted of attempted beastiality. I was intrigued by the "attempted." It doesn't seem to me to be a very difficult crime to commit.


Sounds like he got caught with his pants down.

There's a joke about a farmer sitting in a bar looking sad and his friend asks what's wrong.  He replies some things you just can't explain.  He said he was milking the cow and she kicked the milk bucket so he took some rope and tied her right leg to the stanchion.  Then the cow kicked the bucket with the left leg and the farmer did the same with the left leg.  Then the cow started swatting the farmer in the head with it's tail so the farmer decided to tie the tail up to an overhead beam.  He found a stool, but had no more rope, so he took off his belt to tie up the tail.  During this process his pants fell down and right at that moment his wife walked into the barn.  Some things you just can't explain.

Nov 24, 2020 - 8:27:51 AM
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DC5

USA

16015 posts since 6/30/2015

There are more than a couple of first cousin marriages, which explains a lot. There is supposed Penobscot Indian blood on my mothers side, but most of the story behind that has been proven false so the only way I'll really know is if I have a DNA test done. On my fathers side we can trace back to the revolutionary war where one great great something or other went from Washington's side to the British side and after the war moved to Canada and helped found a town. Family immigrated back to Lawrence Massachusetts and spread about central Mass. There's a family castle ruins somewhere in Wales, and part of the family comes from County Cork. My mother's side, being Swedish, becomes very hard to trace. The first family member changed his name when he came to America, so tracing back to Sweden becomes difficult, and following Swedish family names is quite a challenge. Had one great great grandfather who fought in Cuba during the Spanish American War. I used to wear his coat in the winter, nice wool coat with a cape. My Grandfather founded the David Clark company, which started out making bras and girdles, but moved to space suits and hearing protection and communications.

Nov 24, 2020 - 9:09:32 AM

11235 posts since 1/15/2005

Nov 24, 2020 - 9:11:08 AM

550 posts since 10/9/2017

Thanks to a cousin of my late father's with an interest in genealogy we have a pretty detailed record of his side of the family going back to Lithuania in the IIRC 16th century. Records on my mother's side start with my great-grandfather, who immigrated to the US from Galicia in the late-19th century; he had 9 children who lived to adulthood. We have lots of pictures from that generation, but I don't think anyone knows much about family left behind in the old country. In all likelihood, descendants of any family members who didn't emigrate were killed in the Holocaust.

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