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Nov 20, 2020 - 3:51:05 PM
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2096 posts since 6/19/2014

One cut up free-range chicken (free-range is a little fattier than the caged boiler hens, not to mention better for the guilty conscience!), two onions, quartered, cup and a half of carrot pieces (I buy organic carrots only because those are the only ones that come with the green tops still attached -- I chop up the greens and throw them in as well), two heads of garlic, peeled and sliced; half cup, more or less, of fresh ginger, peeled and sliced, four or five celery stalks washed and cut into four inch lengths. Bring to a boil, then simmer, on low for four hours.

Then comes the fun part: I fish out the chicken meat, now falling apart, and the carrot pieces and set aside. Then I strain the broth, discarding the remaining solids. Usually I let the clear soup sit in the fridge overnight (although today I could have put the pot out on the back deck -- it's minus 5 C. here) so I can skim off the shmaltz the next day, but were hungry and can't wait, so I skipped that step. I'll take care of it tomorrow with the leftovers.

Finally, the matzoh balls. One quarter cup olive oil, one quarter cup matzoh meal, seasoned (just salt and pepper, nothing fancy), and two eggs. Combine all three ingredients in a small bowl and refrigerate for fifteen minutes. Then, with wet hands, roll the mix into little balls and drop them (carefully -- they splash!) into the boiling soup. Cover, cook for another fifteen minutes, and -- voila! -- a little bit of heaven:

Salt to taste, add back some of the chicken and a couple of carrot pieces, and slurp.  Doesn't get much better than this.  Here I've made about a gallon of soup, so there will be lots to freeze, or give away to the children.

Nov 20, 2020 - 5:13:51 PM

2647 posts since 4/22/2018

That sounds and looks superb. Another one added to my ‘to do list’ - it does look lovely!

Nov 20, 2020 - 6:33:36 PM
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Brian T

Canada

17591 posts since 6/5/2008

I have to see chicken and lots of it. I need several handfuls of barley.

Maybe why I enjoy the chicken pot pies so much.

I've never had matzoh balls. I will look for them in the city.
I have a "bucket list" stuck on my wall. Your Matzoh balls just made the list.

Nov 20, 2020 - 6:53:28 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

14632 posts since 9/27/2007

I love all poultry! From freezer eagles to Cornish game hens! Partridge , grouse & pheasant . Ducks & geese. There's not one bird I love the least! 

Nov 21, 2020 - 12:17:19 AM
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rinemb

USA

12905 posts since 5/24/2005

I swear what my wife makes is carrot soup, with a chicken.

She keeps it very simple. Salt and pepper only for seasoning. Uses only big mature carrots for flavor and to cut up to her desire. Then celery and onion.
She as well, puts chicken and veggies in the pot until meat mostly falls off bones. Saves the broth, chicken meat, and carrot pcs. Puts that back in pot then adds "soup" noodles.
To serve, she carefully portions out the carrot pcs...I swear, she counts them. Keeping in mind the leftovers.
Brad

Nov 21, 2020 - 1:14:11 AM

3154 posts since 4/29/2012
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Haven't had decent chicken soup and kneidlach (matzoh balls) since my mother died (wish I'd videoed her making chicken soup, cheesecake, potato latkes and her chicken pillaf). She learned to cook from her Polish grandmother who ran a kosher boarding house in an English seaside resort.
I'm pretty sure she made the balls with the schmaltz skimmed off the chicken soup. And the chicken had to be a 'boiling fowl', whatever that is. I might just give your recipe a go.

Nov 21, 2020 - 3:01:50 AM

2647 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by AndrewD

And the chicken had to be a 'boiling fowl', whatever that is. I might just give your recipe a go.


I suspect I have two boiling fowl in my garden at the moment Andrew.  Not raised for the table. yet now they are not laying anymore, they are destined for the table anyway.  Where shall I post them to?

Nov 21, 2020 - 5:19:03 AM
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figmo59

USA

32345 posts since 3/5/2008

Liz here:
Al's tablet won't let him post all of a sudden, so he asked me to say that I make KILLAH soups!

Nov 21, 2020 - 6:45:51 AM
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rinemb

USA

12905 posts since 5/24/2005

quote:
Originally posted by figmo59

Liz here:
Al's tablet won't let him post all of a sudden, so he asked me to say that I make KILLAH soups!


I would be honored to sit at your table anytime.  Soup, in a cast iron kettle over a fire gotta be good!  Brad

Nov 21, 2020 - 6:48:40 AM
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rinemb

USA

12905 posts since 5/24/2005

quote:
Originally posted by bubbalouie

I love all poultry! From freezer eagles to Cornish game hens! Partridge , grouse & pheasant . Ducks & geese. There's not one bird I love the least! 


I was same way, even my wife liked all things fowl.  In my younger days-when my friends were younger...or still alive, they knew this. So our freezer was always loaded with wild game and wild fowl. Some from my own hunting-especially, quail, pheasant, dove.  Not so much anymore.  Brad

Edited by - rinemb on 11/21/2020 06:53:08

Nov 21, 2020 - 7:29:32 AM

Banjo Lefty

Canada

2096 posts since 6/19/2014

I left the large pot (covered tightly) out on the back deck overnight. This morning when I took it back in I was disappointed to find only a thin film of fat on the surface, even though the top half inch of soup had frozen. Chickens just aren't as fat as they used to be, even free range hens. Maybe they get too much exercise with all that running around. What I need for next time is a big lazy overweight couch potato of a chicken.

Anyway, I skimmed off what I could, put it in a little plastic food saver box, labeled it with the date, and popped it into the freezer for future use. The rest of the soup is being divided up into two person portions. I'll freeze one, use one for tonight's supper, and give the remaining two to my daughters, one each. They really need to learn to make things on their own, and not rely on Dad so much. The youngest is over thirty now, so there's no excuse.

Nov 21, 2020 - 9:11:47 AM
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Brian T

Canada

17591 posts since 6/5/2008

"Free Range" means by law that the chickens have open access to grassy pen space under the stars.
Generally, they do not use it. As flock-bird behavior, they don't want to go alone, it's cold and windy and no amount of food and water will convince them.

So I'll buy a real farm chicken.
I can appreciate how hard it is to pull this stunt in any city of any serious size.
Those birds run about the place eating bugs and weeds.
Had a couple over for dinner and they dropped off the bird.
3 hrs at 285F with apple wood smoke was a treat to behold.

Nov 21, 2020 - 2:07:40 PM

3154 posts since 4/29/2012
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It's an old one - But worth repeating. When Marilyn Monroe visited Arthur Miller's mother when they got married she was given chicken soup with matzoh balls. She took one taste and said "Isn't there any other part of the matzoh that we could eat ?"

Nov 21, 2020 - 5:01:05 PM

2647 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by Banjo Lefty


Anyway, I skimmed off what I could, put it in a little plastic food saver box, labeled it with the date, and popped it into the freezer for future use. The rest of the soup is being divided up into two person portions. I'll freeze one, use one for tonight's supper, and give the remaining two to my daughters, one each. They really need to learn to make things on their own, and not rely on Dad so much. The youngest is over thirty now, so there's no excuse.


Would that be a good excuse to spend some quality time together in the kitchen?  With the added bonus that they can then produce a tub of soup for you down the line smiley

I do have to say that your soup looks great Lefty, I've never had that kind of soup or dumpling.  I suspect I'd really like it though as I've had a few trips to Austria and they have something similar, however, they tend to serve the clear soup with one or two very large dumplings in it.  I could never resist it when it was on the menu - it was usually a starter course and inevitably had me struggling through my main course, but hey, god loves a tryer !

Nov 21, 2020 - 6:57:53 PM
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Brian T

Canada

17591 posts since 6/5/2008

Maybe 3-4 mornings a week, I have chicken soup, more like thick chicken stew, for breakfast.
Sits in my guts, settles my guts, hot food. Put a pastry crust on it for chicken pot pies.
I had forgotten about the PP, must see if our village G store has any.

Nov 22, 2020 - 4:46:27 AM

550 posts since 10/9/2017

Those are some killer kneidlach. I confess I’ve never been able to get them consistently right.

The only suggestion I have for that soup would be petrushka (parsley root). Nothing better in kneidlach soup, although I don’t know how well it would get on with the ginger.

Nov 22, 2020 - 5:07:19 AM

3154 posts since 4/29/2012
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by Remsleep

Those are some killer kneidlach. I confess I’ve never been able to get them consistently right.

The only suggestion I have for that soup would be petrushka (parsley root). Nothing better in kneidlach soup, although I don’t know how well it would get on with the ginger.


My mother agreed that ideally a chicken soup should contain petrshka. But it wasn't available any more in London. About 20 years ago we saw it in the central market in Budapest. But I didn't know what to look for until we noticed an old woman picking up and sniffing the petrushka at each stall. Obviously a petrushka maven. So we followed her around until she chose to buy and bought from the same stall. I proudly presented it my mum when we got back. I must admit it didn't add anything obvious to the soup.

Nov 22, 2020 - 6:18:46 AM
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rinemb

USA

12905 posts since 5/24/2005

Speaking of roots...We always make a Christmas Eve meatless soup for the family. One time we made Snow Soup. All white vegetable roots and with seasonings. cook it all up in vegetable broth, then puree' it. Garnished with some color; as I recall, chopped parsley, pomegranite seeds?
Twas, Yummy! Brad

Nov 22, 2020 - 7:08:53 AM

550 posts since 10/9/2017

quote:
Originally posted by AndrewD
quote:
Originally posted by Remsleep

Those are some killer kneidlach. I confess I’ve never been able to get them consistently right.

The only suggestion I have for that soup would be petrushka (parsley root). Nothing better in kneidlach soup, although I don’t know how well it would get on with the ginger.


My mother agreed that ideally a chicken soup should contain petrshka. But it wasn't available any more in London. About 20 years ago we saw it in the central market in Budapest. But I didn't know what to look for until we noticed an old woman picking up and sniffing the petrushka at each stall. Obviously a petrushka maven. So we followed her around until she chose to buy and bought from the same stall. I proudly presented it my mum when we got back. I must admit it didn't add anything obvious to the soup.


Maybe your petrushka maven felt it was required but didn't actually like it, so was looking for the least fragrant roots? I can smell the difference from the entrance to the kitchen between soup with and without, and I think the roots are quite tasty in the soup. I'm sure there's some link between petrushka and the miracle healing properties of the brew.

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