Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

431
Banjo Lovers Online


Nov 14, 2020 - 5:58:18 AM

plars

USA

209 posts since 11/26/2007

Do you guys know what banjo J. D. Used on “runaround” from his album titled Straight Ahead?

It would be cool to formulate a list of what banjo he used on what recordings. Any help is appreciate.

Here is link to the song:
m.youtube.com/watch?v=mTJypelmRUo

Nov 14, 2020 - 8:05:34 AM

roydsjr

USA

694 posts since 5/17/2007

I don't know but that is one of my favorite albums that I have!

Nov 14, 2020 - 9:32:44 AM

1189 posts since 4/8/2004

pretty sure the 75, robby boone or bob rogers would know for sure. just guessing here, but before the early 80s a 3 a granada and banger.

Nov 14, 2020 - 9:50:04 AM

plars

USA

209 posts since 11/26/2007

Thanks for your input. Hopefully I can get confirmation. I know recordings have compression added almost every time. Sometimes extra reverb or natural reverb, depending on the room, impacts the banjos tone. That recording has one of the ‘gutsiest’ tones I’ve heard.

Nov 14, 2020 - 4:09:05 PM

2732 posts since 11/15/2003

Runaround, and stoney Mt,twist, both from the straight ahead album are by far among my favorite jd instrumentals to play,

Robby Boone would be the expert to go too
But I was under the belief that this was during Jd,s granada years...meaning he played a Granada on the whole album,
I'm most likely wrong, but a maple banjo would help explain the heightened sense of reverb.

Warp!

Nov 14, 2020 - 4:51:08 PM
likes this

RB3

USA

885 posts since 4/12/2004

Just so there's no confusion, I think it should be pointed out that creative credit for the composition of Stoney Mountain Twist goes to Walter Hensley.  But, I can't imagine that Walter ever played it better than J.D. played it on that recording.

The song also appears on some Hensley recordings as Walt's Breakdown.  Walt played for a good spell with Earl Taylor, Jim McCall and The Stoney Mountain Boys back in Sixties, so that accounts for it showing up as Stoney Mountain Twist.
 

Nov 14, 2020 - 4:54:07 PM
like this

1284 posts since 3/24/2006

There’s a tremendous tone difference in the cuts on the Straight Ahead recording.....at least to my ears. The two instrumentals always sounded like a maple banjo to me, so years ago I asked Crowe about those specific cuts.....he told me that the entire project was cut with 752-4......Bob Rodgers RB75.

Robby

Edited by - Robby Boone on 11/14/2020 16:55:17

Nov 14, 2020 - 5:51:50 PM
likes this

plars

USA

209 posts since 11/26/2007

You guys are a wealth of knowledge. I appreciate all the response. Be safe out there!

Nov 15, 2020 - 4:47:11 AM
likes this

3430 posts since 4/27/2004

quote:
Originally posted by Robby Boone

There’s a tremendous tone difference in the cuts on the Straight Ahead recording.....at least to my ears. The two instrumentals always sounded like a maple banjo to me, so years ago I asked Crowe about those specific cuts.....he told me that the entire project was cut with 752-4......Bob Rodgers RB75.

Robby


I would attribute the tone differences to recording sessions on different days. I have heard engineers say that they can put everything back exactly like it was from the previous session but my experience (and my ears) say that it's just about impossible. Now, I'm talking about recording sessions of 30 years ago! Todays technology might be different!

Nov 15, 2020 - 6:02:48 AM

2732 posts since 11/15/2003

You know guys,
This very discussion goes to the very heart of why it's the hands, and the ability of the individual more than the instrument they were preforming with,

Along with Robby, I'd of swore Crowe was getting that tone from a maple ax, but that just goes to show you what mahogany can do when a talented player is bearing down on it,

As the inference to the baron of Baltimore a one walt Hensley,
Back in those days of when he was writing things like Stoney Mt twist, and doing his famous Columbia lp recording ( if you.ve not heard it it's worth looking up on YouTube)
Walt, and Jd, and others were all friends, and this area of the country, Lexington, Cincinnati, Baltimore,, it was a hotbed of activity for bluegrass and these guys seen each other on a regular basis, and some were friends as young teens.

Going back to walt, the first time I got to go on one of Vernon McIntyres bus, was at Branson when walt was playing banjo...he was simply amazing to watch...
He had a boogered up left hand, and his ring finger on the left hand stuck out straight,..broke,could not note with it, and yet he could flawlessly play
Sunrise, with all the intricate single string riffs...his roll was smooth as a stainless steel countertop.

Vernon has walt's old fender banjo, I've played it a couple of times...absolutely nothing spectacular or remarkable about it, but in his hands...it just came to life....the way a true musician knows how to do it...finding those sweet spots, and getting in the pocket,
Much the way guys like Robby and lynwood do when they pick up banjos....

Warp!

Nov 16, 2020 - 7:38:02 AM
likes this

1284 posts since 3/24/2006

quote:
Originally posted by plars

Do you guys know what banjo J. D. Used on “runaround” from his album titled Straight Ahead?

It would be cool to formulate a list of what banjo he used on what recordings. Any help is appreciate.

Here is link to the song:
m.youtube.com/watch?v=mTJypelmRUo


One other thing Crowe told me is that he recorded more with his 20 hole RB3 (116-3) than he did with the "Banger" PB3 (9467-5) and the RB75 (752-4) combined. Just a little meaningless trivia for you. ;) 

Robby 

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.1572266