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Oct 28, 2020 - 2:12:09 AM
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2306 posts since 4/22/2018

Well that didn’t go so well! I’d throw it in the bin, but it’s a two man lift smiley


 

Oct 28, 2020 - 2:46:35 AM

3020 posts since 4/29/2012

I've been making all of our bread since Covid kicked off. 200g 50/50 white/rye for the starter and 400g 50/50 white/wholemeal next day is where my experiments are at now. I did try spelt in a previous bread making phase. Never got a decent rise or texture.

Oct 28, 2020 - 3:06:37 AM
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56047 posts since 12/14/2005

The Late Great Irene and I had a bread maker machine.
The white bread worked out OK, but the RYE bread, OY!
Tough as a board.
So I drilled a hole through it ( knife wouldn't work) and hung it outside for the birds.
Figured with a bit of rain or snow, it would soften up enough for them.
Did NOT.

Oct 28, 2020 - 3:22:49 AM

2306 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by AndrewD

I've been making all of our bread since Covid kicked off. 200g 50/50 white/rye for the starter and 400g 50/50 white/wholemeal next day is where my experiments are at now. I did try spelt in a previous bread making phase. Never got a decent rise or texture.


We've been doing the same Andrew - bought a bread maker at the start of covid and get sacks of flour ftom a local bakery.  Didn't do anything different to usual with this one - it just decided not to play ball - quite spectacularly

Oct 28, 2020 - 3:49:28 AM

3020 posts since 4/29/2012

I've got a bread maker somewhere. It makes consistently ok but not great bread. I don't mind waiting. And the actual work in making a couple of loaves by hand is about 20 minutes of mixing and kneading to get far superior results. Here's my current recipe (for 1 loaf):

  • Day 1:
  • mix 100g strong white, 100g rye, 4g dried yeast, 250ml water.
  • leave overnight at room temperature
  • Day 2:
  • mix 200g strong white, 200g wholemeal, 4g dried yeast, 1tbsp salt, starter from day1, 200ml water
  • knead for about 10 mins until stretchy
  • place in oiled covered bowl in fridge for 3 hours
  • tip into wood banneton
  • leave for an hour at room temperature
  • put pyrex bowl (or whatever) of water in bottom of oven and turn up high (220C on my fan oven)
  • when oven is up to heat turn bread out onto non-stick baking tray and slit with a lame  - 2 long slits with my long banneton, noughts & crosses (tic-tac-toe for furriners) slit with my round banneton
  • bake for 30 mins (YMMV)

Edited by - AndrewD on 10/28/2020 03:56:50

Oct 28, 2020 - 3:54:10 AM

2306 posts since 4/22/2018

I’ll give that a go - thank you.

Oct 28, 2020 - 3:57:59 AM

3020 posts since 4/29/2012

quote:
Originally posted by Wet Spaniel

I’ll give that a go - thank you.


Reread the recipe. I changed it from 250ml water on day 2 to the (correct) 200ml.

Oct 28, 2020 - 4:02:29 AM
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m06

England

9297 posts since 10/5/2006

If you need a hand sharpening your chainsaw teeth...?

I like to make the occasional loaf. The way the one's I bake turn out, they could double up as chocks for the wheels of a light aircraft.

Edited by - m06 on 10/28/2020 04:04:15

Oct 28, 2020 - 4:29:44 AM

2306 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by m06

If you need a hand sharpening your chainsaw teeth...?

I like to make the occasional loaf. The way the one's I bake turn out, they could double up as chocks for the wheels of a light aircraft.


I think it's a new chain job Mike !

Oct 28, 2020 - 4:36:47 AM
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bubbalouie

Canada

14394 posts since 9/27/2007

Slice it thin & toast it. Melba Toast!

Oct 28, 2020 - 4:41:41 AM
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Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

25127 posts since 8/3/2003

I love making bread and learned years ago that whole wheat bread is dense, not light and fluffy. I made a couple of loaves that could be used as door stops or concrete blocks, but figured out pretty quickly that you needed to add regular flour, bread flour, white flour, if you will, to have light, easy to slice and eat bread.

I have one main bread recipe that uses 1 cup wheat flour and 3(plus a little more) white flour. Makes a beautiful loaf and is always light and tasty.


 

Edited by - Texasbanjo on 10/28/2020 04:42:32

Oct 28, 2020 - 4:44:27 AM
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9730 posts since 8/22/2006

Maybe it’s your compression release valve?
Oh!wait...that’s from another thread all these chainsaws are starting to run together sorry. It’s early here I’ll just go back to bed.

Oct 28, 2020 - 5:09:07 AM
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2306 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by 5B-Ranch

Maybe it’s your compression release valve?
Oh!wait...that’s from another thread all these chainsaws are starting to run together sorry. It’s early here I’ll just go back to bed.


I'm not one for 'LOL' but that did make me laugh - that's brightened up my morning!

Oct 28, 2020 - 5:37:26 AM
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13270 posts since 6/29/2005

I saw this subject on my BHO "newest posts" sidebar and thought it must be a mistake.

I've been baking bread ever since Julia Child showed how to do it on her show back in the 1960s.  After having gone through numerous recipes (including a "country French" one you needed a chainsaw to cut), I now make spelt bread and make all our bread in between making banjos, so bake day is fairly hectic, especially in the morning when there is a schedule to get the dough going.

FWIW, the basic recipe to make 8 loaves, takes 22 cups of flour, part Sir Lancelot high-gluten bread flour, which you have to buy in 50# bags, and part whole spelt flour, which I get in 25# bags.  You need the high gluten bread flour because the spelt flour on it's own doesn't have enough gluten to produce a good texture, and you'd need a chainsaw to cut the bread ha ha.  The bread flour produces the texture, the spelt flour produces the flavor, and there's nothing like it.

I use a poolish recipe, and the poolish has to ferment for 8 hours, so the whole process start to finish is 20-24 hours.

I also make rolls, using the same basic recipe cut in half, not baked as hard, which makes 24 rolls.

Edited by - Ken LeVan on 10/28/2020 05:39:05

Oct 28, 2020 - 6:22:47 AM

2306 posts since 4/22/2018

That all looks superb Ken!

Oct 28, 2020 - 6:24:04 AM
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2306 posts since 4/22/2018

Phew, I’m pleased to report it was a one off glitch - 2nd attempt has turned up it much better!


 

Oct 28, 2020 - 6:51:59 AM
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rinemb

USA

12700 posts since 5/24/2005

Ken, that looks spectacular! Brad

Oct 28, 2020 - 6:56:44 AM
Players Union Member

rinemb

USA

12700 posts since 5/24/2005

Either its my bread or its my knives. But I learned one should not take for granted what a good bread slicing knife should/can be and the care of it. We have a German brand knife for smaller breads and sandwiches. And a long one for the big loaves.
We have dedicated knives for the breads. Hack on the bone-in meats, and veggies with other knives. My wife has her "favorite" knife, she will misuse on everything. I am finally convincing her after 48 years knives can be your friend, or lover. Treat em right. Brad

Oct 28, 2020 - 7:36:49 AM

9730 posts since 8/22/2006

The yeast I expect is of rising concern. Bad job at a pun? Anyway the only thing I know about bread making is what I read on the ingredients from a loaf already prepared. But fresh baked there’s nothing I would rather smell at 6:00am in the morning. You guys..bake on bros bake on. Just leave me enough yeast to make my wine.

Oct 28, 2020 - 8:50:41 AM

Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

25127 posts since 8/3/2003

Okay, all this talk about bread got me off my duff and into the kitchen. I have bread rising and will get it baked this afternoon. Pictures later (hopefully it will turn out as well as my other bread has).

Oct 28, 2020 - 9:23:59 AM

13270 posts since 6/29/2005

I have to say this is a lot more fun than laminating banjo rims.

Oct 28, 2020 - 10:22:17 AM

figmo59

USA

31970 posts since 3/5/2008

It is good to poke fun at yer own failuers... ;0)

Oct 28, 2020 - 11:27:55 AM

516 posts since 10/9/2017

Since the Plague started I've been baking sourdough pretty regularly. 80% bread flour to 20% of (take your choice) spelt, rye, or whole wheat. 80% hydration and 2% salt. Works great.

  • Day 1 before bed: Make levain 1:2:2 starter/flours/ water.
  • Day 2 in the morning: Make dough, rise, and shape for bannetons; about 20 minutes of work over 4 hours. Proof in fridge overnight.
  • Day 3 (or 4): score, bake in dutch oven covered at 500*F for 20 minutes. Uncover, reduce heat to 450 and bake until done (22 minutes for an 800g loaf). Let cool. I make two loaves, so I have to do this twice, as I only have one dutch oven of the proper size.


Ken, those loaves look superb. Do you freeze the ones that you won't eat in the next day or two? Or give them to friends and family? I bake two at a time and by the time the second is mostly eaten it's time to start over. 

Oct 28, 2020 - 12:15:19 PM
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Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

25127 posts since 8/3/2003

Well, here's what my loaves of bread look like when they're done. For some reason, they're not as high as usual, maybe it's the addition of that wheat flour. However, the taste is fantastic. Made adding chopped ripe olives and sunflower seeds.




Oct 28, 2020 - 12:23:20 PM

289 posts since 10/4/2018

I've been using a technique similar to remsleep. Whether I use a levain, biga, poolish, or any kind of pre-ferment, I mix the white flour, water and starter/yeast mix and separately hydrate the rye/whole wheat/spelt...etc. on a 1:1 ratio with water and have two doughs setting out overnight. One with leavening and one without. I only put 20-25% of non bread flour into the recipe or it won't raise up very much. but when I add the last amount of bread flour for final hydration (autolyse), I add in 1/2 tsp of yeast and it helps out a lot with the rise. You can probably use up to 30% whole grains into the recipe, but I am happy how it turns out with 25%. Usually the recipes add in some honey or sugar and some fat, either oil, butter or milk. I believe the sweeteners help with browning, so you don't over-bake your dough unnecessarily and the fat helps to soften the bread. Probably about a tablespoon of each per loaf or two. If you have seeds, you don't want to put them in until you are halfway done with kneeding (I do a stretch and fold instead). These techniques have helped me out from making dense and hard loaves to lighter and softer loaves. I hope it helps.

Oct 28, 2020 - 12:36:59 PM

13270 posts since 6/29/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Texasbanjo

Well, here's what my loaves of bread look like when they're done. For some reason, they're not as high as usual, maybe it's the addition of that wheat flour. However, the taste is fantastic. Made adding chopped ripe olives and sunflower seeds.


They look yummy!

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