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Oct 27, 2020 - 6:03:54 AM
5 posts since 8/3/2020

I was restoring a 1970s ibanez banjo when i found that the flange was in 2 peices a bottom mastertone style ring and a hoop thing that is broken many thanks.


Only new to doing this so dont SHOUTwink .....

Edited by - Cptsparky on 10/27/2020 06:04:57

Oct 27, 2020 - 6:14:27 AM
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beegee

USA

21937 posts since 7/6/2005

well, pictures would sure be a help....so here:

What you have is a typical 2-piece flange. No mystery. The tube part slides on the bottom of the rim first, bearing on the turned wooden bead around the rim. Then the plate goes on. The whole thing is held together when you affix the the j-hooks to the tension hoop. Make sure to keep everything aligned before you tighten it up.
It appears that your tube part is broken. If so, it can be silver-soldered or brazed. It is likely made of steel and chrome-plated.

Edited by - beegee on 10/27/2020 06:21:19

Oct 27, 2020 - 6:36:35 AM

5 posts since 8/3/2020

@beegee
Thanks alot thats exactly what i needed! Its a shame they are not separately sold anyhow thanks alot buddy

Oct 27, 2020 - 6:58:53 AM
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KCJones

USA

966 posts since 8/30/2012

quote:
Originally posted by Cptsparky

@beegee
Thanks alot thats exactly what i needed! Its a shame they are not separately sold anyhow thanks alot buddy


https://www.ebay.com/i/224209507507

I am not affiliated with this ebay listing.

Cox Banjos also sells tubes and plates seperately:

https://coxbanjos.com/parts_list.php

Edited by - KCJones on 10/27/2020 07:00:22

Oct 27, 2020 - 7:11:01 AM
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2382 posts since 4/7/2010

quote:

Cox Banjos also sells tubes and plates seperately:

https://coxbanjos.com/parts_list.php


I have not received a reply from any phone calls or emails to Cox. I have assumed he is retired.

 

Bob Smakula

Oct 27, 2020 - 7:39:01 AM
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KCJones

USA

966 posts since 8/30/2012

quote:
Originally posted by Bob Smakula
quote:

Cox Banjos also sells tubes and plates seperately:

https://coxbanjos.com/parts_list.php


I have not received a reply from any phone calls or emails to Cox. I have assumed he is retired.

 

Bob Smakula


Now that you mention it I think I heard the same thing a while back. Realistically, the $30 ebay tube is probably a better choice for repairing a 70s Ibanez. 

Oct 27, 2020 - 8:01:31 AM
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beegee

USA

21937 posts since 7/6/2005

quote:
Originally posted by KCJones
quote:
Originally posted by Bob Smakula
quote:

Cox Banjos also sells tubes and plates seperately:

https://coxbanjos.com/parts_list.php


I have not received a reply from any phone calls or emails to Cox. I have assumed he is retired.

 

Bob Smakula


Now that you mention it I think I heard the same thing a while back. Realistically, the $30 ebay tube is probably a better choice for repairing a 70s Ibanez. 


"IF" it fits. I'd just take it to a welding shop. The average person would never notice it and hey...it's a 70's Ibanez

Oct 27, 2020 - 8:52:41 AM

1148 posts since 5/19/2018

Take it to a welder or maybe better yet, a jeweler who specializes in repairs.

Either can do it and you know it will fit.

If you buy one, the slightest difference in size could make the part useless.

Should be an easy repair.

Oct 28, 2020 - 7:29:09 AM

beegee

USA

21937 posts since 7/6/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Alvin Conder

Take it to a welder or maybe better yet, a jeweler who specializes in repairs.

Either can do it and you know it will fit.

If you buy one, the slightest difference in size could make the part useless.

Should be an easy repair.


I agree. I have seen numerous imported banjos where the hole-spacing in the flange and tension hoop was off enough to make it annoying when trying to interchange parts.

Oct 28, 2020 - 9:13:03 AM

13459 posts since 10/30/2008

Your broken "tube" from a 2 piece "tube and plate" flange arrangement is much better handled by a jeweler than a welding shop. It doesn't really require a super-strong repair, more a delicate highly localized repair that doesn't make the plating come off due to excessive heat application. PLEASE be sure you're not missing small chunk of the tube -- if those two broken ends mate back together perfectly (looks there was a hole for a tension hook right at the break), then you should be good to go.

I agree, rather than fuss around finding a jeweler, explaining to him what the deal is, waiting for him to do it, hoping it all still fits, if the eBay tube is cheap, try it. Only Gibson used this tube, so "hopefully" if they copied a Gibson tube everything should line up. Hopefully.

Now if my Dad was going to fix this on his cellar workbench, here's what he would do. Find a short piece of dowel that fits tightly inside the tube (whittle or put the dowel in a drill chuck and spin it on sandpaper), and use it to hold the two ends together. Drill a hole down through the dowel where the tension hook needs to go through.  Then use all the tension hooks, and the wood bead on the outside of the rim, and the flange plate to hold the thing in its proper shape. That's what Dad would do.

Edited by - The Old Timer on 10/28/2020 09:14:21

Oct 29, 2020 - 2:12:55 AM

Helix

USA

13072 posts since 8/30/2006

The tubes fit Gibson spacing.

They don't sell enough tubes, so now you have to buy the plates and cheap rez.

I'm experimenting with rolling my own out of red brass 3/8" pipe. They shine up gold with clear coat.

The chrome toilet supply tubing is still available in lengths, drilling is a trick, do it after rolling.

The Old Timer I like your Dad's solution.

Oct 29, 2020 - 11:16:47 AM

Helix

USA

13072 posts since 8/30/2006

The non Gibson spacing like Aida’s,
Iidas are literally drop fit parts for their stuff . That’s why used parts don’t always work
They did flatten the bottom of the tubing through a die, the only boon

Nov 5, 2020 - 10:20:36 PM

10865 posts since 10/27/2006

Inspect the rim first. I've seen a couple of these where the bead became de-laminated from the rim.

If that's the case, Tite Bond is your friend. Get some in there and push the bead back into place. Those I've repaired slipped back into place using the wet glue as a lubricant. No clamping necessary.

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