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Oct 25, 2020 - 10:22:58 PM
2198 posts since 1/16/2010

What’s up guys?

I recently bought a “19-teens” Perfection oil heater...I plan on using it in my small shop while tinkering around out there.

It’s an old shop, not very air tight. Being conscious of exposure to exhaust fumes, I’m wondering what you all think will give the cleanest burn. A high grade K1 clear Kerosene is what I planned on using...but a friend of mine recommended using low odor mineral spirits. He says (LOMS) is pretty much the same as kerosene, just even more refined...and burns cleaner.

I dug around online...and see some people advocating “for” using (LOMS) in their oil heaters, and also “against”.

What do you chemists out there say? What do those of you in the know say?

Who still uses a kerosene heater in the house? 

Thanks,

Dow

Edited by - Texican65 on 10/25/2020 22:23:41

Oct 25, 2020 - 11:50:34 PM

55994 posts since 12/14/2005

I cannot imagine using an unvented combustion heater indoors.
Carbon monoxide kills several people a year, in this part of the country.

Oct 26, 2020 - 12:03:33 AM

2198 posts since 1/16/2010

I know it’s 2020...but heck...at one time kerosene was the “cream of the crop”...as good as it got. Back in the 1920’s...my grandmother’s family had a kerosene cook stove in the kitchen and a kerosene heater In the living room, almost identical to the one I just bought...and kerosene lamps in every room. Lots of folks used kerosene indoors for many years...until widespread electrification of rural America took place.

I understand your concern and warning however...that’s one reason that I want the cleanest burning distillate I can find. Plenty of good ventilation in my shop, so I think that’ll help me keep on a’ tickin’.

What’s your experience with mineral spirits Mike?

Dow

Oct 26, 2020 - 12:41:02 AM
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55994 posts since 12/14/2005

Don't recall ever using mineral spirits as fuel.

Oct 26, 2020 - 6:16:26 AM
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5710 posts since 9/21/2007

I sometimes use a kerosene heater (of recent make) in my garage shop. I just use the clear kerosene. My "shop" is more or less a cement floor barn with plenty of ventilation. I also have a CO2 detector.

My house did not get electricity until around the 1950s. Even then it was only a light bulb hanging from the celling in a few select rooms. It was not fully electrified until the late 1960s (according to the guy we bought it from, he installed it).

My house was lit with tallow candles, later whale oil, and even later kerosene (my area does not have gas, the house was built in the 1790s).

With the kerosene heater, I am more afraid of fire than anything.

I have a dust collector. I use a dust hood when I sand. I vacuum and sweep after every "batch" I make. So I keep it as dust free as I can. But sawdust is highly flammable and can even ignite in the air.

I am very careful not to produce a lot of sawdust when the heater is burning.

Oct 26, 2020 - 6:43:54 AM
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Players Union Member

DC5

USA

14481 posts since 6/30/2015

I'd definitely get a CO detector, and if your heater isn't equipped, some kind of low O2 sensor. Modern Kerosene that is made for heaters burns pretty clean. Have a fire extinguisher handy, and don't put the heater between you and the door.

Oct 26, 2020 - 6:44:21 AM
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177 posts since 9/6/2019

quote:
Originally posted by Joel Hooks


I have a dust collector. I use a dust hood when I sand. I vacuum and sweep after every "batch" I make. So I keep it as dust free as I can. But sawdust is highly flammable and can even ignite in the air.

I am very careful not to produce a lot of sawdust when the heater is burning.


I was just going to say that flashover from fine wood dust is as big of, if not more, a worry than fuel because even if the area is ventilated enough to get rid of fumes, the dust will still gather.

Oct 26, 2020 - 9:07:52 AM
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2198 posts since 1/16/2010

Thanks guys. I’ll keep that in mind about the dust, and also gasoline jugs I have in there...I’ll need to relocate those to another shed I guess.

The heater is 100+ years old, so no O2 sensor...I may look around for a CO2 detector however.

I think I may try Klean Strip-Klean Heat. It’s essentially a super refined kerosene/mineral spirit...both having about the same flash point. Lots of folks seem to have good results with it.

This thing is basically a "lamp" style heater...it has an oil reservoir with a wick. Pretty cool...


Dow




Edited by - Texican65 on 10/26/2020 09:13:25

Oct 26, 2020 - 10:14:15 AM
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DRH

USA

564 posts since 5/29/2018

If your shop leaks air like an old house then you have nothing to worry about as long as your heater produces a clean flame. Using a nonvented heater in a modern house with gaskets on the doors and windows is not a good idea.

Oct 26, 2020 - 4:22:54 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

14369 posts since 9/27/2007
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Down on the east coast where I lived a lot of people had Coleman stoves on their kitchen counters. I know the power went out a lot during storms. I'm not sure why but they used them even when the power was on.

Maybe Coleman fuel was cheaper than electricity? I never heard of any problems with Co2 or carbon monoxide.

My Dad would run a catalectic kerosene heater in our big canvas tent at night when we were camping with no problems. But they breathe better than new houses.

Oct 26, 2020 - 9:56:03 PM
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2198 posts since 1/16/2010

I guess the trick is to have an old house or shop that’s not “air tight”. And that being the case...I think I’ll be fine...my house and shop breathe very well...I’m worried that the heat generated in the shop might just go right outside.

Coleman stoves run on “white gas” isn’t it Bob? White Gas aka Naptha...ultra refined gasoline. That’ll burn hotter than kerosene...Probably more volatile...I’ll steer clear of it for this application. Works good in the camp stoves though!

Oct 28, 2020 - 2:52:30 PM

DRH

USA

564 posts since 5/29/2018

My fellow soldiers thought I was a panzy for refusing to sleep in a heated tent. Later that week we lost a soldier to a Coleman stove. Nobody questioned me after that. Even a canvas tent doesn't leak enough to counter the effect of a dirty flame.

Oct 28, 2020 - 4:02:14 PM

Bart Veerman

Canada

4748 posts since 1/5/2005

Some while ago I bought a portable kerosine one for my workshop, a double car garage. It looked real nice but didn't put out near enough BTUs to do anything much to the temps I was hoping for. It did a great job of stinking up the place though so got rid of it.

Edited by - Bart Veerman on 10/28/2020 16:02:48

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