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Oct 24, 2020 - 1:22:28 PM
2370 posts since 12/18/2004

I am trying to educate myself about the style 6 gold sparkle Gibsons.
I have never owned a style 6 nor have I yet got the chance to build a style 6 conversion neck but I have always wondered why Gibson used one shade of gold sparkle on fingerboard trim which is truly "gold colored" but the trim around peg head is sparkled but it is more of a copper color........You would think they would have matched the sparkle trim?
Can anyone give any insite to this?
Thanks
Don Bryant NC banjo luthier

Oct 24, 2020 - 3:02:19 PM
Players Union Member

corcoran

Canada

399 posts since 8/3/2004

My experience is with repro style-6 necks, not original prewar necks. FWIW, 3 of the necks that I have intalled at various times on my style 6 (which is a high-profile prewar flathead with gold sparkle trim) were bound with yellow gold sparkle on the peghead and fretboard. The fourth was orange gold throughout. The binding on the prewar resonator is yellow gold. At one point a luthier suggested to me that the orange tint seen on the gold sparkle binding on some banjos has to do with the sealant used on the neck, with some sealants changing the binding from yellow to orange with time, whereas other sealants preserving the original yellow gold. The few original prewar 4-string necks I have seen on model 6 banjos for sale on the internet seemed to show consistency in the tint of the gold binding, yellow or orange, on the peghead and fretboad. But that is a mighty small sample size. So I don't really have a convincing answer to your question.

Oct 24, 2020 - 3:12:51 PM

rcc56

USA

3194 posts since 2/20/2016

Gibson???  Why????    [Imagine a hysterically laughing emoji here]  

I suppose they could have used different techniques of scraping and finishing the bindings, depending on the location . . .

Oct 24, 2020 - 3:17:30 PM

hbick2

USA

275 posts since 6/26/2004

quote:
Originally posted by rcc56

Gibson???  Why????    [Imagine a hysterically laughing emoji here]  

I suppose they could have used different techniques of scraping and finishing the bindings, depending on the location . . .


Like a friend of mine used to say "it would have been great to work for Gibson back then. Everything you did was an original."

Oct 24, 2020 - 3:28:12 PM

200 posts since 11/16/2011

The gold was consistent on the PT-6 neck I had. Perhaps the difference you're seeing is light being reflected from the sparkle on two different planes.

Oct 24, 2020 - 4:20:27 PM

2370 posts since 12/18/2004

quote:
Originally posted by 550Spyder

The gold was consistent on the PT-6 neck I had. Perhaps the difference you're seeing is light being reflected from the sparkle on two different planes.


Paul,

Could you post a pic of that PT6 neck you used to own?

So far all of the prewar 6 necks I have seen which aren't many had the mis match of gold sparkle to orange on peg head.

 

Don

Oct 24, 2020 - 5:09:43 PM
likes this

200 posts since 11/16/2011

quote:
Originally posted by bryantde
quote:
Originally posted by 550Spyder

The gold was consistent on the PT-6 neck I had. Perhaps the difference you're seeing is light being reflected from the sparkle on two different planes.


Paul,

Could you post a pic of that PT6 neck you used to own?

So far all of the prewar 6 necks I have seen which aren't many had the mis match of gold sparkle to orange on peg head.

 

Don


Here's a photo enlarged that was taken in more even light to highlight the gold but still reflected from two different angles which washes out some of the gold.  

Oct 24, 2020 - 5:29:40 PM

rcc56

USA

3194 posts since 2/20/2016

I see two different sizes of bindings in the above picture, so I would say that it is most likely due to color differences in the 2 sizes of the raw material.

If you see a lot of the old oval hole Gibson mandolins, you will see that the color of the faux tortoise pickguards varied quite a bit. They varied from lighter to darker, some were more red, some more brown; and there was even one batch of plastic that appeared in 1917 that had green highlights.

Oct 24, 2020 - 5:57:48 PM

200 posts since 11/16/2011

quote:
Originally posted by rcc56

I see two different sizes of bindings in the above picture, so I would say that it is most likely due to color differences in the 2 sizes of the raw material.


I disagree it is due to two different sizes of bindings, the gold sparkle looked consistent having it in hand. 

Oct 25, 2020 - 9:47:53 AM

roydsjr

USA

683 posts since 5/17/2007

I would think you are right Paul about the 2 different size bindings which affecting the look in a picture and how it sort of tricks the brain by looking at it. But if you focus on the color of the gold sparkle, I agree it looks closely the same.

Oct 25, 2020 - 9:49:48 AM

roydsjr

USA

683 posts since 5/17/2007

I just realize that if I click on the picture that it blows it up some.

Oct 25, 2020 - 11:32:15 AM

2370 posts since 12/18/2004

quote:
Originally posted by 550Spyder
quote:
Originally posted by bryantde
quote:
Originally posted by 550Spyder

The gold was consistent on the PT-6 neck I had. Perhaps the difference you're seeing is light being reflected from the sparkle on two different planes.

Paul......this neck does in fact look to me like the same binding color!......first prewar I have seen that is this close.


Paul,

Could you post a pic of that PT6 neck you used to own?

So far all of the prewar 6 necks I have seen which aren't many had the mis match of gold sparkle to orange on peg head.

 

Don


Here's a photo enlarged that was taken in more even light to highlight the gold but still reflected from two different angles which washes out some of the gold.  


Oct 26, 2020 - 12:58:41 PM

2599 posts since 4/16/2003

Re the pic Paul Ebbe posted above:
Could some of the "color difference" be due to the fact that the peghead has a finish applied and the fingerboard probably does not?   devil

Oct 26, 2020 - 3:53:23 PM

2370 posts since 12/18/2004

John,
I am a banjo luthier in NC and have built close to 150 prewar 5 string conversion banjo necks over the years most all of the Gibsons made but not a style 6.

I respectfully disagree with the idea of the finish on the style 6 causing the difference in color of binding because...........When the lacquer turns yellow with age over the years it will make the color of the binding look yellowed as well!.......But is will also cause the pearl on peg head to appear yellowed as well!

That's not the case on the style 6s I have seen....most all of them have peg head binding that looks more copper orange colored than the gold sparkle on fingerboard but the pearl will still be white or same color as the pearl in the ebony board and it had no finish on it.

I have concluded that in most cases they used binding on peg head that was not same color as fingerboard binding......this is my opinion as others may believe otherwise!
Thanks
Don Bryant NC banjo luthier

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