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Oct 22, 2020 - 9:18:46 PM
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4752 posts since 1/5/2005

My daughter-in-law asked me to make her a cutting board and finish it in the modern "distressed" way. I found a suitable plank in my too-nice-for-the-fireplace pile that had air-dried, well, not so great over the years - too many knots (crumbled at that) for "real wood-working" but looking distressed enough for the younger folk's taste.

I figured maybe I can smack in some nails, wet them or something, maybe a splash of vinegar, and get them to rust real good so they leave a decent stain when I yank them nails back out. Maybe leave a wet pad of steel wool on the wood or something?

So the question: how do I make rust spots in less than two weeks? Yeah, I know, I don't at all get the new-fangled distressed-finish thing either...

Oh, if you're curious, I got me the biggest hug when she saw the cutting boards I made her a couple of weeks ago: https://www.banjohangout.org/topic/369476/#4676826 so I'm shooting for a huge encore

She's an amazing lady and, well, who am I to refuse her but I sure could use your help smiley

Edited by - Bart Veerman on 10/22/2020 21:22:32

Oct 22, 2020 - 9:32:08 PM
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117 posts since 4/4/2010

Oct 22, 2020 - 10:42:22 PM
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10877 posts since 10/27/2006

Oh man, ya just gotta love Bob Vila for tips like this.

Oct 23, 2020 - 4:51:12 AM
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Brett

USA

2397 posts since 11/29/2005

Muriatic acid will rust stuff fast. I’d shake, scuff, whatever to add scratches and wear. Poke small holes in thick cardboard. Poke your nails through and suspend head down over open foot tub or small of muriatic acid.
It’s Brick cleaner available all hardware stores cheap
The heads will rust and look old, the nail shafts should be sorta protected by the cardboard shield. So the nails should remain solid but the heads exposed will rust.

Oct 23, 2020 - 4:54:27 AM
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Brett

USA

2397 posts since 11/29/2005

Works great aging anything, check couple times a day. Only do outside don’t breathe in when you pour it out and try not be around it. Pour it in gently to your tub, so no splashing. Go away. Do your cardboard thing, lay it on top of tub upside down and get away from it.
Lift cardboard couple times daily to check. Don’t breath it. It won’t take long.

Oct 23, 2020 - 5:16:44 AM
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2217 posts since 2/7/2008

Just to be sure, you're not so much looking for a rusty nail, but to have a hole with a rust stain, do I have that right?

I think I would drive the nail and then pull it out, then put some iron filings in the hole with some vinegar and salt.

My only concern would be that if it's really going to be used as a cutting board, you don't want left over filings getting into food. I guess you could try to blast them out with compressed air.

Oct 23, 2020 - 6:01:12 AM
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526 posts since 2/6/2018

....not sure how healthy rust would be on a cutting board. :-0

Oct 23, 2020 - 8:23:30 AM

2468 posts since 3/30/2008

Why would there be "rust" stains on a wood cutting board anyway ??  An aged cutting board has a certain patina, but I don't think rust is part of the look. 

Edited by - tdennis on 10/23/2020 08:34:26

Oct 23, 2020 - 10:43:32 AM
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Owen

Canada

6932 posts since 6/5/2011

quote:
Originally posted by MoJoBanjo

....not sure how healthy rust would be on a cutting board. :-0


Not strictly aligned with the OP, but I suppose it would depend on whether the person that ingests it is deficient in iron.  This site https://www.thepigsite.com/news/2016/05/iron-delivery-to-piglets-just-got-easier-1 says it's "new technology," but I recall as a kid,  piglets getting a routine dose of iron paste.  If it's good enough for a pig........... 

Oct 23, 2020 - 10:03:28 PM
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Bart Veerman

Canada

4752 posts since 1/5/2005

Thanks so much for the great suggestions guys, hugely appreciated! Yes, it'll be a studio prop all right so definitely no worries about food-grade.

Quickstep: yup, rust-stained nail holes - the young folk really go for that and will gleefully pay extra for it, go figure...

The whole thing's making me scratch my head: why bother with exact stuff like banjo bridges that need crazy tight shop tolerances when you can slop out this kinda junk, the uglier the better - plus or minus an inch or two, it's all good! Check the google for distressed wood furniture/ornaments, you'll see what I mean.

Banjo builders: check out your pile of scrap & oops pieces of wood in the corner of your workshop, yer probably sitting on a fortune. Yup, sure seems like garb, I mean RESCUED/REPURPOSED, is where the big money is at smiley

Stay tuned, I'll post the pics when I'm done and thanks again,

Bart.

Edited by - Bart Veerman on 10/23/2020 22:07:18

Oct 24, 2020 - 1:18:07 AM

Helix

USA

13095 posts since 8/30/2006

Bart, sometimes you have to give the kids a yellow leaf to keep them from crying for gold. Maybe later.

Anyway, happy oxidation,  show us later, please.

Aside:  Someone gifted me 12" wide Walnut flooring which gave 6 necks, one rim, two breadboards, and a toilet paper holder plate. 

Edited by - Helix on 10/24/2020 01:25:51

Oct 24, 2020 - 8:54:42 PM

Bart Veerman

Canada

4752 posts since 1/5/2005

Here's the pics for the two I made. They turned out quite a bit darker with the oil finish than I had expected so I skipped the nail hole thing.

Definitely, a studio prop only as the cracks and check ruts are pretty deep, you wouldn't want any food getting stuck in them. If it would have been for myself, I would have filled them cracks with the banking soda and crazy glue but this is what she had her heart set on.

Thanks again for the great suggestions,

Bart.

Oct 25, 2020 - 4:19:22 AM

340 posts since 12/9/2010

Potassium Permanganate in a strong oxidising agent which we sometimes use in the violin world to quickly "age" wood. It can be easy to overdo, but if you mix up a weak solution and then wipe on/wipe off with a wet cloth then it can do a good job of making new wood blend in well for repairs. And it oxidises metal too, as I found out to my frustration when I splash some on my tools and they got rust spots.

Oct 25, 2020 - 11:19:03 AM

Brett

USA

2397 posts since 11/29/2005

thank you Theo, that’s something I will try out.

Oct 28, 2020 - 3:25:26 AM
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56047 posts since 12/14/2005

I love it!
Some charming lady wants a BRAND NEW cutting board, but it's got to look like a crappy OLD cutting board, and will NEVER actually be used as a cutting board.
And OF COURSE, we all jump right in with suggestions as to how one might accomplish such a strange goal.

It is amazing what we mere mortal men will do, at the bequest of a charming woman.
Let us raise our glasses in a toast to all the women for whom we so gladly toil!


Edited by - mike gregory on 10/28/2020 03:27:21

Oct 28, 2020 - 7:00:10 AM
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13475 posts since 10/30/2008

Acids and potassium permanganate certainly will oxidize, but they also might leave behind trace salts (Chlorine from muriatic/hydrochloric acid, and manganese from the Potassium Permanganate). Something that leaves no salt behind (other than from the metals you're rusting) might be high strength hydrogen peroxide -- a strong and somewhat safer oxidizer.

Since food prep may be involved...

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