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Oct 20, 2020 - 2:01:30 PM

Owen

Canada

6815 posts since 6/5/2011
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What are the relative advantages or disadvantages of these 2 types track layout... i.e. 2 sprocket vs. 3 sprocket?  [It's a legitimate question...not a quiz.]

Drive Sprockets and Track Drives

Track and Track Frames

Oct 20, 2020 - 2:18:46 PM
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DRH

USA

564 posts since 5/29/2018

The three sprocket design has several advantages. The drive mechanism is higher which improves ground clearance. The drive sprockets are less likely to pack with mud or snow. It doesn't need as many (if any) carrier rollers which are failure prone. The track has significantly less tension which reduces pin wear on all metal tracks. There is more clearance in the track mechanism for improved self cleaning. Changing or repairing a track is easier.

I've replaced tracks on a 1950's 17A-D7 (two sprocket design). Not fun. We had to dig a pit under it just to be able to crawl underneath.

Edited by - DRH on 10/20/2020 14:19:14

Oct 20, 2020 - 2:29:37 PM

Owen

Canada

6815 posts since 6/5/2011
Online Now

Thanks Doug.... it's just one of the things that I've wondered about for no particular reason.... but with the advantages you point out, it does seem to fit into the "how come nobody thought of it earlier" category.  The only tracked machine I've ever owned is my [two sprocket] Craftsman snowblower. 

Would there be any diff in  the simplicity or layout of gearboxes and/or drive shafts?

Edited by - Owen on 10/20/2020 14:31:04

Oct 20, 2020 - 3:36:07 PM
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DRH

USA

564 posts since 5/29/2018

quote:
Originally posted by Owen

Thanks Doug.... it's just one of the things that I've wondered about for no particular reason.... but with the advantages you point out, it does seem to fit into the "how come nobody thought of it earlier" category.  The only tracked machine I've ever owned is my [two sprocket] Craftsman snowblower. 

Would there be any diff in  the simplicity or layout of gearboxes and/or drive shafts?


My experience (limited to a Bobcat) with the high sprocket systems tells me they are easier to work on.  Bobcats and trackhoes, however, use hydraulic motor hubs.  I don't know much about large dozers these days.  They may not even have transmissions anymore.

I know the old systems were a real chore.  That doesn't mean the new stuff is necessarily easier to service though.  Modern cars come to mind.

Oct 20, 2020 - 4:41:30 PM
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14938 posts since 12/2/2005

quote:
Originally posted by DRH

My experience (limited to a Bobcat) with the high sprocket systems tells me they are easier to work on.  Bobcats and trackhoes, however, use hydraulic motor hubs.  I don't know much about large dozers these days.  They may not even have transmissions anymore.


It's been quite a while since I paid any attention to such things, but I suspect that by now most heavy equipment is hydrostatic. It was trending that way 20 or 30 years ago.

Oct 20, 2020 - 4:56:53 PM

DRH

USA

564 posts since 5/29/2018

quote:
Originally posted by eagleisland
quote:
Originally posted by DRH

My experience (limited to a Bobcat) with the high sprocket systems tells me they are easier to work on.  Bobcats and trackhoes, however, use hydraulic motor hubs.  I don't know much about large dozers these days.  They may not even have transmissions anymore.


It's been quite a while since I paid any attention to such things, but I suspect that by now most heavy equipment is hydrostatic. It was trending that way 20 or 30 years ago.


I think you are right.  I haven't been on a track machine in 40 years.  The last one was a D6 with hydrostatic drive.  Spent the first ten minutes looking for nonexistant steering clutches.

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