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Oct 13, 2020 - 6:14:12 AM
2217 posts since 9/25/2006

I’m playing my longneck with a rock band right now. I usually have my capo at the third fret to play in “G.” Would D tuners work with this arrangement? Would the string path allow the D tuners to do their job with the capo on most of the time? Anybody tried this? Just wondering....

Oct 13, 2020 - 6:29:43 AM
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13454 posts since 10/30/2008

Yes, D tuners can work with the capo on. No different than simply tuning the banjo with the capo on. You'll have to get your capo technique to be really precise and repeatable at just the right pressure to let this all take place.

One hint, be sure the groove/notch in the nut allows smooth movement of the string without catching.

You may/probably need to "set" your tuners while you have the capo in use.

Good luck, be patient, it will work out.

Edited by - The Old Timer on 10/13/2020 06:33:21

Oct 13, 2020 - 10:03:01 AM

14938 posts since 12/2/2005

quote:
Originally posted by The Old Timer

Yes, D tuners can work with the capo on. No different than simply tuning the banjo with the capo on. You'll have to get your capo technique to be really precise and repeatable at just the right pressure to let this all take place.

One hint, be sure the groove/notch in the nut allows smooth movement of the string without catching.

You may/probably need to "set" your tuners while you have the capo in use.

Good luck, be patient, it will work out.


With the very greatest respect for Dick (there are few more knowledgeable hereabouts), I'm not sure I agree with this. The problem is that using a D-tuner with a capo - long-neck or not - sets up the very real possibility of creating slightly uneven string tension on either side of the capo (likely to be a bit sharp on the pot side when downtuning, likely to be a bit flat on the pot side when uptuning). The logic, when you get down to it, is why you're always better off tuning your banjo with the capo off, and then applying the capo.

Oct 13, 2020 - 12:26:32 PM
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13454 posts since 10/30/2008

Skip I didn't want to suggest it is easy!

Oct 13, 2020 - 1:58:02 PM
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14938 posts since 12/2/2005

quote:
Originally posted by The Old Timer

Skip I didn't want to suggest it is easy!


Ha!

Roger that, and thanks!

Oct 13, 2020 - 2:14:03 PM
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13258 posts since 6/29/2005

A lot would have to do with the nut, the frets, and the capo.  I would think it would work best with a zero fret nut, hard frets like EVO, and a very slippery-bottomed capo, which I really don't know much about—If this was a thing I wanted to do, I'd use a teflon strip on the capo—You don't want anything hanging it up

I would also set the detuners and get them to work properly with the capo on the desired fret, despite what has been suggested.

Oct 13, 2020 - 5:04:48 PM

Helix

USA

13072 posts since 8/30/2006
Online Now

Yes D tuners will work with capo @ 3

Other places as well  When dialed in, tuning should be minimal  I use lights

as noted nut maintenance and I mean nothing more important to a player than maintaining their nuts so strings can glide, I guess less than 2mm

are you miking at this time?   I forgot to mention Gold Tone has a pickup that also uses a mike inside the banjo

Edited by - Helix on 10/13/2020 17:11:59

Oct 14, 2020 - 1:34:27 PM

2599 posts since 4/16/2003

Here's Dave Guard, who I believe was using a Vega Pete Seeger with D-tuners for "Razors in the Air":
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UomSP8daJUc

Oct 15, 2020 - 10:54:17 AM

GStump

USA

393 posts since 9/12/2006

the other alternative, which i've seen done, is to either find or make, or have someone make, you a "nut" which you can slip on and off the banjo in just a jiffy; something like a "half tube" of brass, steel, aluminum, or whatever you think would work best for you; place it on the 3rd fret, and completely REMOVE the capo. of course you could use it on whatever fret you wish or need to; and simply retune the fifth string, or use spikes or what have you. if you can visualize the old "roller" that you see used in the winding of guitar strings, only long enough to fit across your fretboard, you get the picture. you could probably make one yourself with a few of these and somehow attach 4 of them to a plate or something (very thin of course) and you're in business.

Oct 15, 2020 - 10:57:46 AM

GStump

USA

393 posts since 9/12/2006

Oops.... forgot to mention that the "rollers" or balls if you will, need to be cut in half. the string will follow the groove on the outside of the roller, and the inside part would sit on your fret, or on whatever you mount it to.

Oct 15, 2020 - 11:03:14 AM

55991 posts since 12/14/2005

Going along with Mr. Stump's suggestion:

a 10-32 brass bolt, ground flat, and a groove filed in the underside.

However, as Mr. Helix and Mr. Albert suggest, and Mr. Guard has proven beyond the chatter of a dolt, totally fine to just twist those pegs.
Perhaps an occasional application of string lube, make 'em slide more easily.

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