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Are geese now just messin' * with humans??

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Oct 1, 2020 - 10:08:32 AM
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Owen

Canada

6414 posts since 6/5/2011

*.... no! ... not that "messin' "

Just now a flock of about 20 flew over ... like my crude drawing shows.... flying about 90 degrees to the direction the "V" was pointing.  Neither my wife nor I have seen this before.   At one point she said it looked like they were getting ready to "sort themselves out," but for the <1/2 mile or so we could see them, they never did.... just continued on.    Could it be they'd had a whack of fermenting apples for breakfast?  [i can assure you that I didn't.] ...Or is this something that regularly happens?    Edit: FWIW, not high up, maybe 1/4 mile.... light wind, blowing in the direction the "V" was pointing.

P.S.  My art work (?) is not up for discussion!


 

Edited by - Owen on 10/01/2020 10:25:03

Oct 1, 2020 - 10:21:24 AM
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251 posts since 10/4/2018

I think they use that flight pattern when they go East or West.

Oct 1, 2020 - 10:42:39 AM

Owen

Canada

6414 posts since 6/5/2011

Thanks, Mike, that the best explanation so far.... and they were heading WSW.  wink

Oct 1, 2020 - 10:49:16 AM
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Brian T

Canada

17051 posts since 6/5/2008

There are vortexes(vortices?) of slightly compressed air that come off the wing tips,
each goose can surf a little on them.
The hard work is for the lead goose to break clean air.
I've noticed, over and over again, how the lead changes to share the extra work.

Oct 1, 2020 - 11:29:36 AM
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9642 posts since 8/22/2006

Crabing due to cross winds. It’s a technique like flying planes when there are crosswinds.

Oct 1, 2020 - 3:35:43 PM

RV6

USA

1359 posts since 2/3/2012

quote:
Originally posted by Owen

*.... no! ... not that "messin' "

Just now a flock of about 20 flew over ... like my crude drawing shows.... flying about 90 degrees to the direction the "V" was pointing.  Neither my wife nor I have seen this before.   At one point she said it looked like they were getting ready to "sort themselves out," but for the <1/2 mile or so we could see them, they never did.... just continued on.    Could it be they'd had a whack of fermenting apples for breakfast?  [i can assure you that I didn't.] ...Or is this something that regularly happens?    Edit: FWIW, not high up, maybe 1/4 mile.... light wind, blowing in the direction the "V" was pointing.

P.S.  My art work (?) is not up for discussion!

 


Bad apples, for sure.  Those guys will give geese a bad name.  They should straighten up and fly right!

Do you know why, when geese fly in a normal manner, that there is, most often, one leg of the "V" that is longer than the other?

-

-

-

There's more geese in the long leg.surprise

Oct 1, 2020 - 4:22:12 PM
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9642 posts since 8/22/2006

<snip>

Do you know why, when geese fly in a normal manner, that there is, most often, one leg of the "V" that is longer than the other?

-

-

-

There's more geese in the long leg.surprise

Geesenomics!!

Edited by - 5B-Ranch on 10/01/2020 16:22:48

Oct 1, 2020 - 4:25:06 PM
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Brian T

Canada

17051 posts since 6/5/2008

Behaviour. Singles and odd pairs of geese tend to pick up on the long end of a Vee, just as they come in to land with a strange flock by picking a pocket spot at one end of the flock Vee on the ground.
I watch them join flights. End of the line, if you're late to the party.

Oct 1, 2020 - 5:33:03 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

14190 posts since 9/27/2007

Were they hissing cobra chickens? The kind that leaves cigar butt like crap all over sports fields & parklands.  (Canadian Geese) . Those ones are just too mean to fly around like regular laid back Geese.

Oct 1, 2020 - 5:40:41 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

14190 posts since 9/27/2007

All kidding aside I remember watching huge flocks of ducks & geese flying over all evening in Ontario.

Oct 1, 2020 - 5:51:33 PM
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Owen

Canada

6414 posts since 6/5/2011

That's borderline sacrilege, Bubba!!     Canada geese.... Canada thistle... Canadian whisky .... Canadian Tire.   devil

Edit: .... and to demonstrate to Paul and Chuck that an old dog can indeed learn new tricks: Oh Canada.  wink

Edited by - Owen on 10/01/2020 17:53:57

Oct 1, 2020 - 5:59:04 PM
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1988 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by Owen

*.... no! ... not that "messin' "

Just now a flock of about 20 flew over ... like my crude drawing shows.... flying about 90 degrees to the direction the "V" was pointing.  Neither my wife nor I have seen this before.   At one point she said it looked like they were getting ready to "sort themselves out," but for the <1/2 mile or so we could see them, they never did.... just continued on.    Could it be they'd had a whack of fermenting apples for breakfast?  [i can assure you that I didn't.] ...Or is this something that regularly happens?    Edit: FWIW, not high up, maybe 1/4 mile.... light wind, blowing in the direction the "V" was pointing.

P.S.  My art work (?) is not up for discussion!

 


At the risk of being a smart azz smiley you saw a skein of geese.  They ceased being a flock as soon as they left the ground..  that said, that's a strange sight you witnessed - I'd love to know what they were up to.

Oct 1, 2020 - 6:19:18 PM
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Owen

Canada

6414 posts since 6/5/2011

I guess turn-about is fair play.   blush    https://www.translatorscafe.com/tcterms/en-US/question.aspx?id=87636   

I wonder if a gaggle of several thousand is still a gaggle.   And if the skein has many wedges, is it still a skein?  I'd only ever heard of skein being used w.r.t. yarn.   

I think the bulk of the Canada migration might be past us, although I think the Snow geese are still largely north of us..... but I wouldn't put a lot of $$ on it.

Oct 1, 2020 - 6:37:12 PM
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Brian T

Canada

17051 posts since 6/5/2008

McBride is under a narrow migratory flyway for all sorts of waterfowl.
They come in so low, I could shoot them off my dining room balcony if allowed.

I've only come close (3') to getting hit three times.
20 lbs of dead meat coming in at 40 miles per hour takes some thought.
Hunted Canadas for decades, uncle was a professional guide on the SK plains.
Even grain-fed, finally got tired of the taste.

Oct 1, 2020 - 7:09 PM
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Paul R

Canada

13173 posts since 1/28/2010
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Yes, that messin'.

I was part of the High Park Citizens' Advisory Committee (since renamed, if it still exists) from '92 until we left T.O. in '02. Canada geese were a concern. They were the major contributors to phosphorus pollution in Grenadier Pond. Shoreline rehabilitation was undertaken, replacing the concrete formal park-like border with a natural shore, with lots of bushes. The geese have to have a clear line of sight to water. Great project, whose result was most likely getting the geese to fly over the Queensway, the railway, and the Gardiner Expressway (all smack against each other) to the pristine* shores of Lake Ontario.

* Where's the sarcasm font when you need it?

Oct 2, 2020 - 1:34:49 AM

phb

Germany

2102 posts since 11/8/2010

quote:
Originally posted by RV6
Do you know why, when geese fly in a normal manner, that there is, most often, one leg of the "V" that is longer than the other?

-

There's more geese in the long leg.surprise


I thought they were performing some sort of Belgian tourniquet https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drafting_(aerodynamics)#Belgian_tourniquet

Oct 2, 2020 - 1:44:27 AM

2915 posts since 4/29/2012
Online Now

I think we are ascribing an aesthetic sense to geese which the probably don't have. We get a buzz out of seeing a nice symmetric V with the point forward - so that's what we remember and think of as "correct". The geese just think "my wings don't ache as much if I'm behind and slightly to the side of another goose" - so any pattern that fulfils that will do - Asymmetric V, V pointing backwards or the pattern above. I get regular geese flying over on their morning and evening move between the Lea valley and Epping forest. I'll try and keep a log of how often they are in a classic V.

Oct 2, 2020 - 3:32:14 AM
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1988 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by Paul R

Yes, that messin'.

I was part of the High Park Citizens' Advisory Committee (since renamed, if it still exists) from '92 until we left T.O. in '02. Canada geese were a concern. They were the major contributors to phosphorus pollution in Grenadier Pond. Shoreline rehabilitation was undertaken, replacing the concrete formal park-like border with a natural shore, with lots of bushes. The geese have to have a clear line of sight to water. Great project, whose result was most likely getting the geese to fly over the Queensway, the railway, and the Gardiner Expressway (all smack against each other) to the pristine* shores of Lake Ontario.

* Where's the sarcasm font when you need it?


It's like having a heard of dogs crapping everywhere isn't it? Canada's are non native to the uk but we have a large population who have made themselves resident.  Due to the vast amount they eat and crap, they can be culled under crop protection and public health reasons.

Oct 2, 2020 - 5:49:02 AM

RV6

USA

1359 posts since 2/3/2012

We've gone to the Denver area to visit our two daughters and grandsons over the last 11 years or so.   The geese (or, "winged rats" as some call them) have been an increasing problem in the area.   Walking around some of the ponds in the parks reminded me a bit of my days of stomping around our cattle feedlot.   

Denver is working on the problem: https://www.denverpost.com/2020/07/08/denver-parks-canada-goose-geese/

Oct 2, 2020 - 6:16:36 AM
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Owen

Canada

6414 posts since 6/5/2011

 
Originally posted by RV6

<snip> .... reminded me a bit of my days of stomping around our cattle feedlot.   <snip>


...and, courtesy of the burros, on the streets of Oatman, AZ.   Here's my wife doing the "farmers' two-step" several years ago.


 

Oct 2, 2020 - 7:19:58 AM
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2143 posts since 2/10/2013
Online Now

When I lived up north, flocks of geese flew south in the fall, and north in the winter. In the fall they flying over was a signal that winter was on its way. In the spring, just the opposite.

I have read that their formation offers aeronautical benefits. The goose in the "lead" position periodically changes. The navigational abilities of some types of birds is phenomenal.

A friend's little dog saw 2 adult geese way off in a corn field. He ran at them to teach them a lesson. He ran back a lot faster on his return to his homestead.

Oct 2, 2020 - 9:28:35 AM
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Brian T

Canada

17051 posts since 6/5/2008

The 'Vee" has an aerodynamic effectiveness except for the lead goose. That's why the lead changes. The Vee is flexible to allow the birds to follow the vortices in the shifting air.
Last flock from here goes south before mid December. Doesn't depend on snowfall.
The only ones I ever clocked were cruising at 70 kph.
Working HARD to go somewhere, they can do 90 kph.

Banding proves that our little hummingbirds follow the Rockies all the way south to the Gulf then turn east to winter in Georgia and Louisiana. Third Saturday in April, they are back to exactly where I hang the feeder on my balcony.

Oct 2, 2020 - 11:28:22 AM
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DC5

USA

13716 posts since 6/30/2015
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I remember when I was young that we only saw them briefly in the spring and in the fall. Now some are here year round if there is open water - which happens more and more often with the mythical global temperature rising.

Oct 2, 2020 - 6:04:51 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

14190 posts since 9/27/2007

We feed the hummers year round here. I have pics of them dodging big fluffy snowflakes to get to our feeders.

Rufus, Annas  & the odd Black chinned buzz around here. We have lots of fuchsias & begonias in hanging baskets.

   

Oct 2, 2020 - 9:16:59 PM

Paul R

Canada

13173 posts since 1/28/2010
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by Wet Spaniel
quote:
Originally posted by Paul R

Yes, that messin'.

I was part of the High Park Citizens' Advisory Committee (since renamed, if it still exists) from '92 until we left T.O. in '02. Canada geese were a concern. They were the major contributors to phosphorus pollution in Grenadier Pond. Shoreline rehabilitation was undertaken, replacing the concrete formal park-like border with a natural shore, with lots of bushes. The geese have to have a clear line of sight to water. Great project, whose result was most likely getting the geese to fly over the Queensway, the railway, and the Gardiner Expressway (all smack against each other) to the pristine* shores of Lake Ontario.

* Where's the sarcasm font when you need it?


It's like having a heard of dogs crapping everywhere isn't it? Canada's are non native to the uk but we have a large population who have made themselves resident.  Due to the vast amount they eat and crap, they can be culled under crop protection and public health reasons.


When coyotes moved into the park, I asked our experts if they'd been "introduced to the Canada geese". I was assured that they had. It looked like a win-win situation, except for the humans who a) were afraid for their pets, or b) were stupid enough to feed the coyotes.

We were told way back how frequently a goose poops. I forget, but it's a lot! 

There was a bakery that would dump a load of day-old bread for the geese at the corner of The Queensway and Ellis Avenue.. They were told to cease and desist.

Oct 2, 2020 - 9:35:03 PM
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Brian T

Canada

17051 posts since 6/5/2008

Jump through a few hoops to get qualified and blast a bunch of geese doing crop damage.
The geese don't eat 5% of the crop. They crap all over the crop = unfit for human consumption. What's worse, they simply crush and stomp the crop flat. Like field peas for example.

Give the pea farmer a few birds during the season. At the very least, you shoot some holes in the sky and scare off the birds.

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