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Buddy, can you spare a quarter?

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Sep 27, 2020 - 8:57:44 AM

mander

USA

4391 posts since 10/7/2007

I have no quarters with which to run the machines in the building I live in. While I can hand wash laundry, I have no strength to wring it out. This increases drip-drying time. To add to that, my iron has gone kaputz and I can't afford a new one. The laundromat that uses a card is twice the cost and over a mile down the road. My laundry issues might eventually cost me my job.

For want of a nail, a shoe was lost...

Sep 27, 2020 - 10:26:56 AM

Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

24931 posts since 8/3/2003

I understand that coins are in short supply and know they are in my town. Most banks are closed except for drive-thru and for some reason, those tellers are not allowed to give you cash back!! Weird, huh? Most of the stores around town are also short on coin supplies and I don't know if the bank allows them to get cash or not.

Luckily, I have a stash of quarters that I can use if I need to. Fortunately, I have both washer and dryer, so I don't have to shell out quarters to get clean clothes. I do, however, often exchange those quarters with friends for dollar bills and/or barter with them or, if all else fails, just give them several dollars worth of quarters and they can pay me back someday maybe.

Sep 27, 2020 - 10:48:06 AM

2915 posts since 4/29/2012

That's the way it's going. I took a couple of hundred quid out of an ATM just before lockdown and most of it is still sitting in my wallet. I think the only cash transaction I've done since then is paying the window cleaner. Everything else has been online or card. Cash has been slowly dying for a few years now. Covid has really accelerated that and I don't think it will change back much when this is over. I think we are ahead of the US. But some other countries are ahead of us. I spent a couple of weeks in Sweden a few years ago. I got some spending money in Swedish Krone on the way out. I still had all of it in the airport on the way back so spent it on akvavit, smoked reindeer and lingonberry sauce.

Sep 27, 2020 - 11:08:27 AM
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

17051 posts since 6/5/2008

I was going to suggest you go to a bank and buy a roll of quarters.
I did that to run the machines down the hall in my apartment years.

You guys are short on coins?

Cash is still king here in the village.
We are all aware of the insidious vampire sucking from the Credit Card companies.
Even PayPal on line demands their useless slice.

But, some places, like the local pub, are totally digital, food orders included.
I suppose I could buy my suppers with cash but they are using software
which makes transactions extremely convenient.
I guess they have the charges hidden in the numbers that I see.

Sep 27, 2020 - 4:09 PM
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3015 posts since 10/17/2009

Where's the imaginative DIY folks when you need em?

How would Red Green solve the problem??

Create some type of spin cycle... centrifugal force. Need some kind of tub, drill some holes in. What could spin fast enough?   Hmmm is there a playground nearby, with one of those merry-go-rounds? Red of course would probably find that too obvious; and lacking enough velocity...  and would opt for umph using say a Reliant K Car (or whatever old spare you have sitting around your front yard). Haven't quite figured the math yet...

edit: a bicycle on it's side with tub balanced on top might work... be a bit easier (though not as fun)

On the other hand, I grew up without modern washer and spin cycle; we used mechanical actual wringer... fed the clothes thru rollers. Worked pretty good. So that might be a possibility? The trick is finding some rollers about rolling pin size (what could you use?) and getting enough force between and then a way to crank/turn the rollers.  Again the Reliant K Car, tires are rubber rollers, and drive could create plenty of force. Might be an easier way though.

Might want to watch some of Red's video for inspiration.

Edited by - banjoak on 09/27/2020 16:13:46

Sep 27, 2020 - 4:30:53 PM
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1988 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by AndrewD

That's the way it's going. I took a couple of hundred quid out of an ATM just before lockdown and most of it is still sitting in my wallet. I think the only cash transaction I've done since then is paying the window cleaner. Everything else has been online or card. Cash has been slowly dying for a few years now. Covid has really accelerated that and I don't think it will change back much when this is over. I think we are ahead of the US. But some other countries are ahead of us. I spent a couple of weeks in Sweden a few years ago. I got some spending money in Swedish Krone on the way out. I still had all of it in the airport on the way back so spent it on akvavit, smoked reindeer and lingonberry sauce.


Andrew. I managed to lock the PIN on my cash card the other day whilst using my bank supplied home banking card reader.  No problem the bank said, you can still take cash out of any ATM but before you can make card payments again, you need to just go to one of our own bank ATM and reset the pin - or cancel the card...... Nearest Nat West (that's the name of the bank) was 22 miles away so I ended up taking a load of cash out whilst I could get to the right ATM.  It was the first time in 6 months that I've paid cash for anything - felt really strange, especially handing over 100 quid for the weekly shop. Lots of hand sanitising involved, and also, wondering if we are the last generation who will actually physically have cash in our wallets.

Sep 27, 2020 - 6:21:25 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

14190 posts since 9/27/2007

I call it folding money. We only use it for small local transactions like the fire wood guy or the farmers market.

I take out what I think I'll need & try to spend it all for fear of losing it out of my wallet. The leftover change goes into a jar for parking or pocket change,

Most of our shopping is on debit or credit card. I remember when it was a dime for a phone call or a cup of coffee.

Sep 27, 2020 - 7:34:40 PM
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55629 posts since 12/14/2005

IF you're looking for something like rolling pins to make a wringer, why not GET some actual rolling pins. Thrift stores have 'em.
Put the edge of a piece of laundry between them, put an obscene amount of rubber bands around the handles, and TUG.
Or, put a trash bag or Dollar Store shower curtain on your ironing board as a waterproof cover, set the board on a good slant, and take ONE rolling pin, and lean into it.

OR
set the laundry, a few pieces at a time, in the bath tub, put a board on it, and USE the weight which God and Col Sanders have GIVEN you, to STEP on it.

I have MORE ideas, but these are a few of the milder ones.

About the iron:
Thrift shop.
Desperation?
Boil up some water in your smoothest bottomed saucepan, and iron the clothes with that.

Sep 27, 2020 - 9:51:12 PM

55629 posts since 12/14/2005

Hey, 190,00 of the rest of you!
How about anybody knows of a large, strong mesh bag?
Mander could put a LONG, strong stick through the bottom, another through the top, put the wet wash in, STAND on the lower stick, and twist the upper with both hands.
The longer the stick, the better the leverage.
But I don't know of any one who makes a strong 4foot long nylon bag.
How about a canvas duffel bag, with holes poked in?

Sep 27, 2020 - 9:51:51 PM

55629 posts since 12/14/2005

Oh!
While standing in the bath tub!

Sep 27, 2020 - 10:05:57 PM

Cyndy

USA

636 posts since 3/2/2010
Online Now

My daughter can only get two rolls of quarters at a time from her bank and laundry has become important since she has an in-person rotation this semester. She was going to ask the building management company about switching the machines to card readers. Any chance of that?

Sep 28, 2020 - 5:45:52 AM
Players Union Member

DC5

USA

13715 posts since 6/30/2015
Online Now

mike gregory , I used to use my cast iron skillet as an iron. When my room mates saw me do it they started using it too.
mander , take a rope, tie it around a small bundle of wet clothes and go outside and spin it over your head.
Then again, in that same hose where I used to use the skillet as an iron, I did laundry in the bathtub. Fill with water, add soap, and stomp on the clothes like you're making wine from grapes. Drain the tub, stomp to wring, run a couple of rinse cycles until the soap runs out and stomp to ring again. I've done this in hotel rooms also when they didn't have a laundrymat. Today I would want a hand hold while stomping, but the method would still work.

Sep 28, 2020 - 6:01:48 AM

5772 posts since 9/5/2006

5 gallon bucket and a plunger,, clothes in,, detergent in,, water in ,, start plunging,, pour in the sink,,rinse in sink,, wring out best you can then finish them with a dough roller hang in front of a fan or over stove. to iron,,just use 2 or 3 pots ,,warm them on the stove,,,, iron,, and switch out as they cool .

Edited by - 1935tb-11 on 09/28/2020 06:04:39

Sep 28, 2020 - 6:26:31 AM

55629 posts since 12/14/2005

Like Terry says, with a few minor changes and a major addition:
Have the bucket in the bath tub, so you don't have to lift it to the sink. Just tip it over.
AND-- have a second bucket, same size, with several holes driled in the bottom and sides. (Got this idea from a video where the guy shreds and soaks newspaper and junk mail for stove fuel)
Put the drrilled bucket inside the other bucket, put a board on top, and SIT on it.
That will compress the wet wash.
and the excess water will come up through the holes.
Tip the whole rig sideways, and there goes the water.
Come to think of it, once you've got the second bucket in place, turn the whole thing upside down, and THEN sit on it Of course, that will take more strength, since water weighs.

DO report on any progress.
Also: See if you CAN buy a roll of quarters from the bank.

Sep 28, 2020 - 6:31:16 AM
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Helix

USA

12894 posts since 8/30/2006

This is the hangout Mander

Any town that has a wall of moms
Leaf blower dads and hockey stick patrol has got to have great laundry options

I’d do my laundry down at Goose Hollow, that’s a song and a band right there

Edited by - Helix on 09/28/2020 06:32:16

Sep 28, 2020 - 6:41:44 AM

Owen

Canada

6414 posts since 6/5/2011
Online Now

Edited by - Owen on 09/28/2020 06:42:07

Sep 28, 2020 - 7:02:50 AM
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55629 posts since 12/14/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Helix

This is the hangout Mander

Any town that has a wall of moms
Leaf blower dads and hockey stick patrol has got to have great laundry options

I’d do my laundry down at Goose Hollow, that’s a song and a band right there


Hang the wash on a line running the length of the tub, and hit it with the airstream from a Thrift Store leaf blower!

After, of course, doing the Lucille Ball "Laundry Stomp"

 

Sep 29, 2020 - 11:43:02 AM

mander

USA

4391 posts since 10/7/2007

quote:
Originally posted by mike gregory

Hey, 190,00 of the rest of you!
How about anybody knows of a large, strong mesh bag?
Mander could put a LONG, strong stick through the bottom, another through the top, put the wet wash in, STAND on the lower stick, and twist the upper with both hands.
The longer the stick, the better the leverage.
But I don't know of any one who makes a strong 4foot long nylon bag.
How about a canvas duffel bag, with holes poked in?


I appreciate the advice. Not sure I will try it. My shoulder injury has its limitations. I can not tie my shoes because I can not make the abduction motion without causing injury that can take days to weeks to mend. I wear slip ons. I also can not do the twisting motion using that shoulder. I'm sure braver folks than I could manage, but given the pain I've suffered, at this point, I am extremely protective of my shoulder. If my shoulder says, "Don't do it," then I don't do it.

Sep 29, 2020 - 12:06:26 PM

55629 posts since 12/14/2005

So, one of these buckets with a pair of rollers is OUT?

If you can't PULL the clothes out, because SHOULDER.

I'm trying to think of something that would fit IN the bath tub, and process a lot of clothes at the same time.

The two-bucket system that you simply SIT on to squeeze seems the simplest .

And if you drill a few holes in the OUTER bucket, you wouldn't even have to TIP it.

But if you're washing them in the KITCHEN, and then taking 'em to the bathtub, have a THIRD, undrilled bucket, on some sort of wheeled thingy, to spare your shoulder the strain of carrying  wet wash.

Thrift shop skateboard would work.

I've used  mine to move some pretty big furniture.

Sep 29, 2020 - 12:16:02 PM

55629 posts since 12/14/2005

 


So, one of these buckets with a pair of rollers is OUT?



If you can't PULL the clothes out, because SHOULDER.

I'm trying to think of something that would fit IN the bath tub, and process a lot of clothes at the same time.

The two-bucket system that you simply SIT on to squeeze seems the simplest .

And if you drill a few holes in the OUTER bucket, you wouldn't even have to TIP it.

But if you're washing them in the KITCHEN, and then taking 'em to the bathtub, have a THIRD, undrilled bucket, on some sort of wheeled thingy, to spare your shoulder the strain of carrying wet wash.

Thrift shop skateboard would work.

I've used mine to move some pretty big furniture.

Sep 29, 2020 - 12:16:35 PM

55629 posts since 12/14/2005

So, one of these buckets with a pair of rollers is OUT?



If you can't PULL the clothes out, because SHOULDER.

I'm trying to think of something that would fit IN the bath tub, and process a lot of clothes at the same time.

The two-bucket system that you simply SIT on to squeeze seems the simplest .

And if you drill a few holes in the OUTER bucket, you wouldn't even have to TIP it.

But if you're washing them in the KITCHEN, and then taking 'em to the bathtub, have a THIRD, undrilled bucket, on some sort of wheeled thingy, to spare your shoulder the strain of carrying wet wash.

Thrift shop skateboard would work.

I've used mine to move some pretty big furniture.

Edited by - mike gregory on 09/29/2020 12:19:14

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