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Sep 26, 2020 - 3:08:26 PM
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7812 posts since 1/7/2005
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Some of you who do inlay work may find this of use.
Being a ham-handed Klutz, I have come to the conclusion that any time I saw and shape small pearl inlays, I can count on dropping one or two little bits on the floor. No matter how carefully I watch the trajectory of the falling pearl, they always seem to end up farther away than I would have guessed. And are generally mixed in with other bits and pieces of wood, metal, dirt, and doghair.
In the past, I often had to give up and accept the fact that I needed to re-make the pearl part that took me a good while to fabricate. I hate when that happens.
Here's the trick I discovered: I found that mother of pearl will fluoresce and turn bright blue when exposed to any kind of black light. All you need to do is turn off all the lights in the room, and using a UV flashight, scan the floor around your work space and the piece you dropped will be brightly lit.

I bought the UV flashlight for detecting Spots where my dog may have peed on the floor. It works well for that too. 

DD

Edited by - Dan Drabek on 09/26/2020 15:12:36

Sep 26, 2020 - 3:49:29 PM
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banjonz

New Zealand

11023 posts since 6/29/2003
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BLM! Black lights matter!

Sep 26, 2020 - 3:56:16 PM

Helix

USA

12970 posts since 8/30/2006

That’s what we use to find scorpions over in the desert
I used one to photo shop my dog Jack

i use a magnet and ultraviolet to look over a banjo. And pearl  does light right up


 

Edited by - Helix on 09/26/2020 15:58:23

Sep 26, 2020 - 6:22:56 PM
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2176 posts since 2/7/2008

I thought this was a similarly clever idea.


 

Sep 28, 2020 - 3:02:09 PM
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7812 posts since 1/7/2005
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I'm embarrassed to say how long it took me to understand the boat and the umbrella.

DD

Sep 28, 2020 - 3:10:59 PM
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ChunoTheDog

Canada

407 posts since 8/9/2019

quote:
Originally posted by Dan Drabek

I'm embarrassed to say how long it took me to understand the boat and the umbrella.

DD


I laughed inexplicably hard at your response lol 

Sep 28, 2020 - 4:08:45 PM
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2949 posts since 2/18/2009

I am very grateful to know how to find dropped pearl. If there was a way to find dropped brass dots and dropped screws I'd be fully prepared, I seem to drop them the most.

Sep 28, 2020 - 5:03:06 PM
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13212 posts since 6/29/2005

I drop everything, but the little MOP things are the worst. I grope around with a regular flashlight, but now I will get a UV flashlight.

Ken

Sep 28, 2020 - 5:23:38 PM
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7812 posts since 1/7/2005
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quote:
Originally posted by Zachary Hoyt

I am very grateful to know how to find dropped pearl. If there was a way to find dropped brass dots and dropped screws I'd be fully prepared, I seem to drop them the most.


I have an answer for you on that one. You just walk around the area in your bare feet and you'll find the metal bits. Especially if they're sharp.

DD

Sep 28, 2020 - 6:58:42 PM
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2176 posts since 2/7/2008

I recently took apart a hole saw mandrel and the wavy washer fell off onto the floor. I'm reasonably sure in landed in a 8' x 8' area, but danged if I can find it and it's not like it's a MOP dot, the thing is 3/4" in diameter. I've looked on my hands and knees with a flashlight and magnets, but no dice.

Sep 29, 2020 - 3:44:29 AM
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1401 posts since 10/5/2006

For some reason, everything I drop always bounces and flies under the workbench. That's where I find almost everything - all the way under......

Sep 29, 2020 - 5:49:56 AM
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13212 posts since 6/29/2005

When I dismantle tuners to patina them, each tuner has a little tiny button screw of some unmeasurable metric size, a little nylon washer, a little spring washer (the 5th string tuners have a flat cone type as well) the beveled washers for the top of the peghead the threaded part that screws into the stem, also a metric thread that kinda looks like 3/8 but isn't, and the part that goes from the button to the body.

The little washers stick to your fingers and if you drop one on the floor, they are not replaceable, so you MUST grope around on your hands and knees looking for them.

In the case of MOP inlays, they pop off when you make the last jeweler's saw stroke, and the smaller and more delicate they are, like letters in a logo, the more likely they are to break when they hit the floor. The rubber mat I stand on makes things bounce and go farther away—little MOP dots roll. There are things I have dropped that I have NEVER found and probably got sucked into the shop vac.  So far I have not lost a rim.

Sep 29, 2020 - 6:36:29 AM
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Helix

USA

12970 posts since 8/30/2006

Zach’s Head is further from the floor than the rest of us

Use a coffee filter over the vacuum

Sep 29, 2020 - 6:47:04 AM
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7749 posts since 8/28/2013
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My procedure for finding dropped parts is to utter some expletives.For some inexplicable reason, dropped things seem to respond to such words.

This also works for items that are stuck and items that refuse to go together.

I learned this from my mother, who had learned it from her father, so there is historical evidence that this is a valid method.
 

Sep 29, 2020 - 7:57:49 AM
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Helix

USA

12970 posts since 8/30/2006

Provenance?

Sep 29, 2020 - 8:53:38 AM
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55755 posts since 12/14/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Quickstep192

I recently took apart a hole saw mandrel and the wavy washer fell off onto the floor. I'm reasonably sure in landed in a 8' x 8' area, but danged if I can find it and it's not like it's a MOP dot, the thing is 3/4" in diameter. I've looked on my hands and knees with a flashlight and magnets, but no dice.


Well then, OBVIOUSLY, you should try dice!

Edited by - mike gregory on 09/29/2020 08:54:12

Sep 29, 2020 - 10:10:11 AM
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7749 posts since 8/28/2013
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quote:
Originally posted by Helix

Provenance?


Swearing is part of my family's oral tradition, and oral tradition is, by definition, not written down.

Sep 29, 2020 - 10:32:58 AM
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2176 posts since 2/7/2008

quote:
Originally posted by G Edward Porgie

My procedure for finding dropped parts is to utter some expletives.For some inexplicable reason, dropped things seem to respond to such words. 
 


 Not in my shop! I've usually uttered an expletive before the dropped part even hits the floor. At least it hasn't worked so far and I'm generally using every word I know. 

Sep 29, 2020 - 10:44:41 AM
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161 posts since 4/3/2009

I appreciate this post, if for no other reason to learn that I am not alone...

Sep 29, 2020 - 6:04:37 PM
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Blackjaxe47

Canada

1561 posts since 6/20/2014

I have actually invented some new cuss words. I am also another fumble finger, funny though as I have never once cut myself with a chisel or knife when doing one of my carvings.

Sep 30, 2020 - 7:38:41 AM
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7749 posts since 8/28/2013
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quote:
Originally posted by Quickstep192
quote:
Originally posted by G Edward Porgie

My procedure for finding dropped parts is to utter some expletives.For some inexplicable reason, dropped things seem to respond to such words. 
 


 Not in my shop! I've usually uttered an expletive before the dropped part even hits the floor. At least it hasn't worked so far and I'm generally using every word I know. 


Try not to utter the foul word(s) until after the dropped item hits the floor. Sometimes one can actually hear where the thing hits, which might give at least a hint of where it's headed. Then, and only then, should you unleash your torrent of obscenities, especially if the final noise comes from under a piece of heavy equipment that you need your 200 lb. brother-in-law to help you move.

Sep 30, 2020 - 7:13:33 PM
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1195 posts since 8/7/2017

A professional model RR builder showed me his trick: he puts a waterhog-type rug on the floor under his vice. If something gets dropped, he picks up the rug, holds in in a U shape, and finds the part at the bottom of the U. He demonstrated this technique to me... I'm sure he dropped the part just for the demo :-). This rug trick would not work that well for springy parts that shoot off into space, though. By waterhog rug (name from L L Bean company), I mean a rubber mat with fabric rug material on the upper side. The rug material absorbs the energy of the falling part so it does not bounce, the rubber makes the rug just stiff enough you can control the U when you pick it up by the edges. Walmart has the chinese-made equivalent, but they smell bad, so have to be aired out for several days in the sun and rain.

Sep 30, 2020 - 7:23:22 PM
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geemott

USA

245 posts since 7/7/2005

A watchmaker's apron attaches to the workbench in front of you. Any little thing you drop goes right in the apron. Sometimes letting something purposely drop there is smarter than trying to control it. Anybody who works on tiny parts regularly ought to have one.

Sep 30, 2020 - 7:57:52 PM
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7749 posts since 8/28/2013
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One thing I learned through my ineptitude is that one should not confine the search for lost items to the floor. I've located parts in my shoes and pants cuffs and stuck to my socks.

It's also wise when dropping a fragile piece to stay in one place as much as possible, because the minute you take a step, you will probably hear a small crunch.

Sep 30, 2020 - 8:15:11 PM
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Bart Veerman

Canada

4730 posts since 1/5/2005

quote:
Originally posted by G Edward Porgie


because the minute you take a step, you will probably hear a small crunch.


 

and then come the funny words again as you try to dislodge that thingie from deep inside yer toe angry

Oct 1, 2020 - 7:11 AM
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7749 posts since 8/28/2013
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quote:
Originally posted by Bart Veerman
quote:
Originally posted by G Edward Porgie


because the minute you take a step, you will probably hear a small crunch.


 

and then come the funny words again as you try to dislodge that thingie from deep inside yer toe angry


That "thingie" is why I never work in bare feet. I'm always afraid that a dropped item might be a chisel or a knife blade, and if those hit your foot or get stepped on, you'll end up swearing twice; once at impact, and again a month or so later when the hospital bill arrives.

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