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Sep 23, 2020 - 4:11:30 PM
5789 posts since 9/5/2006

can you think of ?

i got a few

address
match
ring
rose
tire

Edited by - 1935tb-11 on 09/25/2020 04:51:17

Sep 23, 2020 - 4:25:58 PM

55756 posts since 12/14/2005

Sight, cite
Read, reed
Red, read
Break, brake
Bach's box
Rough, ruff
Bread, bred
Tail, tail
Bier, beer.
War, wore.
Yule, You'll
Tide, tied
And then we have
Their, There, They're

Ah, but train, train, train is spelled the same way every time, whether it means a locomotive and cars, or teaching a dog, or the part of the dress that drags on the floor.

Ain't words FUN??   wink

Edited by - mike gregory on 09/23/2020 16:26:34

Sep 23, 2020 - 4:48:26 PM

Banjo Lefty

Canada

1997 posts since 6/19/2014

Homonym means "same name." What Mike has posted are homophones, meaning "same sound."

Homonyms have the same spelling, but may have different sounds, like LEAD, which is either the metal (LED) or the act of being in front (LEED).

Homophones have the same sound, but different spellings, like AISLE and ISLE.

Sep 23, 2020 - 7:24:59 PM

Owen

Canada

6515 posts since 6/5/2011
Online Now

Sep 23, 2020 - 8:17:17 PM

3188 posts since 7/28/2015

homograph = spelled the same
homophone = sound the same
homonym = either one or both

My favorite homophone/nym is oral/aural because they mean almost the opposite of each other.

Edited by - prooftheory on 09/23/2020 20:20:18

Sep 23, 2020 - 8:42:36 PM

kww

USA

610 posts since 6/21/2008

quote:
Originally posted by prooftheory

homograph = spelled the same
homophone = sound the same
homonym = either one or both

My favorite homophone/nym is oral/aural because they mean almost the opposite of each other.


According to Doug Anthony, they are semohominies. Of course, he also knew the identity of the lady in "Stairway to Heaven". https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zQuGub7yzpA

Sep 23, 2020 - 8:51:20 PM

kww

USA

610 posts since 6/21/2008

And for anyone that clicked the link in my last post and had no clue what was going on, the Doug Anthony All-Stars were one of those groups that squandered great musical talent on comedy. On the rare occasions that they were serious, they were excellent, as witnessed by their cover of "Heard it Through the Grapevine": youtube.com/watch?v=5brqK2xIIns

Sep 23, 2020 - 10:02:19 PM
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chuckv97

Canada

52876 posts since 10/5/2013
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by Owen

I give up.... https://www.vocabulary.com/articles/chooseyourwords/homonym-homophone-homograph/


Owen, it's all or nothing again....

Sep 24, 2020 - 2:24:41 AM

2943 posts since 4/29/2012

quote:
Originally posted by prooftheory

homograph = spelled the same
homophone = sound the same
homonym = either one or both

My favorite homophone/nym is oral/aural because they mean almost the opposite of each other.


And my favourite homograph is cleave. Same spelling and pronunciation - opposite meaning. Any others like that ?

Sep 24, 2020 - 4:57:10 AM

5789 posts since 9/5/2006

english was not my strong suite? suit? zoot? what ever,,,,,, so which is it,, spelled the same and sounds the same is a what ?

Sep 24, 2020 - 5:57:45 AM
Players Union Member

DC5

USA

13943 posts since 6/30/2015

quote:
Originally posted by prooftheory

homograph = spelled the same
homophone = sound the same
homonym = either one or both

My favorite homophone/nym is oral/aural because they mean almost the opposite of each other.


So Mike was right to write it the way he did.

Sep 24, 2020 - 6:01:49 AM
Players Union Member

DC5

USA

13943 posts since 6/30/2015

quote:
Originally posted by kww

And for anyone that clicked the link in my last post and had no clue what was going on, the Doug Anthony All-Stars were one of those groups that squandered great musical talent on comedy. On the rare occasions that they were serious, they were excellent, as witnessed by their cover of "Heard it Through the Grapevine": youtube.com/watch?v=5brqK2xIIns


Nothing is ever squandered on comedy.  It is a great gift to be able to make others laugh, and is more rare than the gift of musical talent.  Victor Borge is another prime example.  Not only could he bring the joy of laughter, but he also introduced many to great music who otherwise might not have found it.  

Sep 24, 2020 - 6:09:49 AM

5789 posts since 9/5/2006

quote:
Originally posted by kww

And for anyone that clicked the link in my last post and had no clue what was going on, the Doug Anthony All-Stars were one of those groups that squandered great musical talent on comedy. On the rare occasions that they were serious, they were excellent, as witnessed by their cover of "Heard it Through the Grapevine": youtube.com/watch?v=5brqK2xIIns


those guys are fantastic,,,,  cool harmonies.....

Sep 24, 2020 - 7:37:46 AM

1749 posts since 2/12/2009
Online Now

Ah, Victor Borge ! probably my all time hero in the field of entertainment , perfection !

Sep 24, 2020 - 8:02:53 AM

Jim Yates

Canada

6675 posts since 2/21/2007

quote:
Originally posted by 1935tb-11

can you think of ?

i got a few

address
match
die - dye
ring -wring
rose
tire - tyre


Sep 24, 2020 - 8:12:47 AM

RB3

USA

789 posts since 4/12/2004
Online Now

From the Merriam-Webster dictionary web site:

What are homonyms, homophones, and homographs?
Homonym can be troublesome because it may refer to three distinct classes of words. Homonyms may be words with identical pronunciations but different spellings and meanings, such as to, too, and two. Or they may be words with both identical pronunciations and identical spellings but different meanings, such as quail (the bird) and quail (to cringe). Finally, they may be words that are spelled alike but are different in pronunciation and meaning, such as the bow of a ship and bow that shoots arrows. The first and second types are sometimes called homophones, and the second and third types are sometimes called homographs—which makes naming the second type a bit confusing. Some language scholars prefer to limit homonym to the third type.

Sep 24, 2020 - 8:21:12 AM
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Paul R

Canada

13207 posts since 1/28/2010

quote:
Originally posted by AndrewD
quote:
Originally posted by prooftheory

homograph = spelled the same
homophone = sound the same
homonym = either one or both

My favorite homophone/nym is oral/aural because they mean almost the opposite of each other.


And my favourite homograph is cleave. Same spelling and pronunciation - opposite meaning. Any others like that ?


sanction

Sep 24, 2020 - 9:03:59 AM
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73335 posts since 5/9/2007

I hope there isn't going to be a test.

Sep 24, 2020 - 9:41:24 AM

kww

USA

610 posts since 6/21/2008

quote:
Originally posted by DC5
quote:
Originally posted by kww

And for anyone that clicked the link in my last post and had no clue what was going on, the Doug Anthony All-Stars were one of those groups that squandered great musical talent on comedy. On the rare occasions that they were serious, they were excellent, as witnessed by their cover of "Heard it Through the Grapevine": youtube.com/watch?v=5brqK2xIIns


Nothing is ever squandered on comedy.  It is a great gift to be able to make others laugh, and is more rare than the gift of musical talent.  Victor Borge is another prime example.  Not only could he bring the joy of laughter, but he also introduced many to great music who otherwise might not have found it.  


I grew up listening to the Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band, Homer and Jethro, the Ogden Edsel Blues Ensemble and MondoBizarrio Band, Vivian Stanshall and His Gargantuan Chums, among many others. Music and comedy do go together.

Sep 24, 2020 - 9:41:38 AM
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Players Union Member

DC5

USA

13943 posts since 6/30/2015

quote:
Originally posted by RB3

From the Merriam-Webster dictionary web site:

What are homonyms, homophones, and homographs?
Homonym can be troublesome because it may refer to three distinct classes of words. Homonyms may be words with identical pronunciations but different spellings and meanings, such as to, too, and two. Or they may be words with both identical pronunciations and identical spellings but different meanings, such as quail (the bird) and quail (to cringe). Finally, they may be words that are spelled alike but are different in pronunciation and meaning, such as the bow of a ship and bow that shoots arrows. The first and second types are sometimes called homophones, and the second and third types are sometimes called homographs—which makes naming the second type a bit confusing. Some language scholars prefer to limit homonym to the third type.


what about homophobes?

Sep 24, 2020 - 10:01:18 AM

9668 posts since 8/22/2006

Just throwing this one out hoping to be correct in my understanding of what was asked in the OP

Base
Bass

Sep 24, 2020 - 2:17:11 PM

5789 posts since 9/5/2006

quote:
Originally posted by 5B-Ranch

Just throwing this one out hoping to be correct in my understanding of what was asked in the OP

Base
Bass


i originally was referring to a word that is spelled the same and pronounced the same but can have 2 different meanings

Sep 24, 2020 - 2:47:48 PM

10838 posts since 1/15/2005

quote:
Originally posted by 5B-Ranch

Just throwing this one out hoping to be correct in my understanding of what was asked in the OP

Base
Bass


Beat me to it but I was going with Bass (the fish), Bass (the instrument), and then throw in base (military installation), base (the foundation).

Sep 24, 2020 - 3:24:59 PM

kww

USA

610 posts since 6/21/2008

quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink
quote:
Originally posted by 5B-Ranch

Just throwing this one out hoping to be correct in my understanding of what was asked in the OP

Base
Bass


Beat me to it but I was going with Bass (the fish), Bass (the instrument), and then throw in base (military installation), base (the foundation).


Bass (the fish) and Bass (the instrument) are homographs and heteronyms. I think you get a prize.

Edited by - kww on 09/24/2020 15:30:28

Sep 24, 2020 - 3:39:13 PM

Buddur

USA

2808 posts since 10/23/2004

Cops
Lives
Matter

Sep 24, 2020 - 3:54:57 PM

10838 posts since 1/15/2005

quote:
Originally posted by kww
quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink
quote:
Originally posted by 5B-Ranch

Just throwing this one out hoping to be correct in my understanding of what was asked in the OP

Base
Bass


Beat me to it but I was going with Bass (the fish), Bass (the instrument), and then throw in base (military installation), base (the foundation).


Bass (the fish) and Bass (the instrument) are homographs and heteronyms. I think you get a prize.


A set of steak knives?

Steak or Stake ...... don't know what they are but I prnounce them the same!

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