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New HO F1 replicas in bamboo

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Sep 19, 2020 - 5:05:29 PM
like this

Helix

USA

12938 posts since 8/30/2006

You can’t get these replicas in 1/64 Scale so I make my own
I use the new AFX can motors
1/32 scale controllers which gives brakes
Rubber tires cut from tubing
Roll bars, exhaust pipes and steering wheels from white speaker wire

Both of these cars had straight 8’s And both took the final drive from the middle of the crankshaft
The Bugatti had the engine sideways (transverse) behind the driver
Mercedes was champion and Bugatti was dismal. But on my track they thrash


Edited by - Helix on 09/19/2020 18:45:33

Sep 19, 2020 - 9:12 PM
like this

10833 posts since 1/15/2005

Larry ..... are these cars "throwbacks" to F-1 racing when they actually allowed passing?

Sep 20, 2020 - 5:21:32 AM

5787 posts since 9/5/2006

the older ones were the coolest ,,, alfa romeo was a very cool looking F1 car

Sep 20, 2020 - 5:22:03 AM

Helix

USA

12938 posts since 8/30/2006

Yes, front engine era

1967 is my other favorite year, no wings, no sponsors, they are in the other photo

I had to paint the helmets White, they’re too fast, so you could see them
Here’s the vanwall and the Ferrari 246


 

Edited by - Helix on 09/20/2020 05:22:28

Sep 20, 2020 - 5:30:37 AM
likes this

Helix

USA

12938 posts since 8/30/2006

Thanks Terry for contributing

Alfa Romeo comes in every time with a winner

That alfetta’s win record still stands

I want F1 to have a front engine class who races alongside the rear-engine cars. That’s watchable

And punting your opponent means disqualify

Both Alonso and Montoya had the strength to pass Schumacher on the outside. That’s racing

Sep 20, 2020 - 6:49:47 AM

5787 posts since 9/5/2006

and to think with all of todays technology and the 100 of millions they spend on development and testing and building they have only picked up about 45 MPHs on the 50s F1 cars (straight line speed),,,, shows how good the old ones were.

 i was always a big mario fan,,, after doing reading up on him i found out his idol was ascari. after ascari died ,, mario used him as an inspiration to become the driver he did.   most around here were big petty ,pearson,, foyt,,etc fans as i was but,,,,  but mario always kept my attention.

Edited by - 1935tb-11 on 09/20/2020 06:58:16

Sep 20, 2020 - 8:04:19 AM

Helix

USA

12938 posts since 8/30/2006

Here’s the Alfetta straight 8 w Farina

Sep 20, 2020 - 9:51:21 AM

Helix

USA

12938 posts since 8/30/2006

Ascari won in the rain with those dreadful Ferraris

Mario And Michael as a young passenger would race big Al and little Al as a passenger in rental cars going back and forth from Phoenix to Albuquerque

Mario is not just a winner, he’s a champion of the highest calibre ,
all surfaces , wet or dry, but a class act along with his twin Aldo

Luyendyke?

I saw Jean Alesi repass Senna right here in Phoenix, that was champ, in my view

Sep 20, 2020 - 10:03:36 AM

Helix

USA

12938 posts since 8/30/2006

Here’s Ascari in action

Edited by - Helix on 09/20/2020 10:15:07

Sep 20, 2020 - 11:19:25 AM

Helix

USA

12938 posts since 8/30/2006

Recently I’m using bamboo skewers and light card stock to make bodies

Here’s the Lotus Team HO cars, one with silver, one w gold. These are from the '80s

they still run

i got 19 cars in a cigar box at the thrift store about 2013. I couldnt believe it neither  


 

Edited by - Helix on 09/20/2020 11:30:56

Sep 20, 2020 - 5:42:23 PM
Players Union Member

OM45GE

USA

100973 posts since 11/7/2007

Your cars are great Larry! All my F1 slots are Scalextric. They’re fun but I like yours a lot more.

Edited by - OM45GE on 09/20/2020 17:42:45

Sep 20, 2020 - 6:38:48 PM
likes this

Paul R

Canada

13202 posts since 1/28/2010

quote:
Originally posted by 1935tb-11

the older ones were the coolest ,,, alfa romeo was a very cool looking F1 car


And Alfa Romeo had one of the coolest looking jerseys in bicycle racing, (i'm biased, I have one.)


 

Sep 20, 2020 - 9:16:56 PM

10833 posts since 1/15/2005

Terry ..... as you probably know it is not the straight-line speed that has made the huge difference in the early cars and modern cars ....... it's the down force.  At 200 mph, the modern Indy cars could run upside down on a ceiling.  Larry mentioned the Flying Dutchman Arie Luyendyk.  I met him in 2003 after he retired at the Indy 500.  Here is a photo of him with our group.  One photo is of me and a friend right beside the Borg-Warner Trophy and in front of the car out host was sponsoring.  The other photo is in the garage with the young man in the middle who was the driver, Tony Renna.  Tony did a great job that day, as a rookie, and finished 7th in the "Cure Autism" car.  Unfortunately several months later he was killed in a crash during some tests........ tragic.






Edited by - BanjoLink on 09/20/2020 21:20:47

Sep 21, 2020 - 11:24:33 AM

Helix

USA

12938 posts since 8/30/2006

Wow that must have been exciting

Thanks for letting us see those

im a big fan of Alfa 

Edited by - Helix on 09/21/2020 11:31:01

Sep 21, 2020 - 3:49:38 PM

5787 posts since 9/5/2006

quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink

Terry ..... as you probably know it is not the straight-line speed that has made the huge difference in the early cars and modern cars ....... it's the down force.  At 200 mph, the modern Indy cars could run upside down on a ceiling.  Larry mentioned the Flying Dutchman Arie Luyendyk.  I met him in 2003 after he retired at the Indy 500.  Here is a photo of him with our group.  One photo is of me and a friend right beside the Borg-Warner Trophy and in front of the car out host was sponsoring.  The other photo is in the garage with the young man in the middle who was the driver, Tony Renna.  Tony did a great job that day, as a rookie, and finished 7th in the "Cure Autism" car.  Unfortunately several months later he was killed in a crash during some tests........ tragic.


cool pics john,,,, yeah the venturi body causing negative pressure was a major development in F1 and indy cars ,, the turn speeds now are insane.  i mean 5 times its body weight in downforce,,, hard to imagine.  just think what guys in the old days could do with the cars of today.....  i just always admired mario because he could get into any type of car and win... didn't make any difference to him ,, just race it.  he is the only guy to win the indy 500. daytona 500 and a F1 championship,, pretty big feats by any standards.  here he talks about his flip at indy in 2003 at age 63 running 220 plus 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMKRvi9UPjk

Sep 22, 2020 - 9:11:54 PM

10833 posts since 1/15/2005

quote:
Originally posted by 1935tb-11
quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink

Terry ..... as you probably know it is not the straight-line speed that has made the huge difference in the early cars and modern cars ....... it's the down force.  At 200 mph, the modern Indy cars could run upside down on a ceiling.  Larry mentioned the Flying Dutchman Arie Luyendyk.  I met him in 2003 after he retired at the Indy 500.  Here is a photo of him with our group.  One photo is of me and a friend right beside the Borg-Warner Trophy and in front of the car out host was sponsoring.  The other photo is in the garage with the young man in the middle who was the driver, Tony Renna.  Tony did a great job that day, as a rookie, and finished 7th in the "Cure Autism" car.  Unfortunately several months later he was killed in a crash during some tests........ tragic.


cool pics john,,,, yeah the venturi body causing negative pressure was a major development in F1 and indy cars ,, the turn speeds now are insane.  i mean 5 times its body weight in downforce,,, hard to imagine.  just think what guys in the old days could do with the cars of today.....  i just always admired mario because he could get into any type of car and win... didn't make any difference to him ,, just race it.  he is the only guy to win the indy 500. daytona 500 and a F1 championship,, pretty big feats by any standards.  here he talks about his flip at indy in 2003 at age 63 running 220 plus 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMKRvi9UPjk


Mario was an incredible driver and versatile as you have pointed out.  I have been to bunch of racing schools (Skip Barber Formula Fords), Jim Hall (Go Carts),  and Jim Russell (Rotary Engine open wheel car with wing) but have never driven a car where you really experience a downdraft.  Although the Jim Russell school was at California Motor Speedway, we drove on the inside road course and only got onto the big track straight-away for a short run.  I don't think we could really tell how much the wing was doing.  We got up to about 132 mph in the Formula Fords, but they are not designed for any down force ...... at least when I was driving them.  All of our instructors were terrific drivers and I don't think the average person or race fan understand how much skill these guys have.  Even the ones that work for BMW at their testing facility here in Greenville are darn good and make those cars do just about anything.

Sep 23, 2020 - 4:02:59 PM

5787 posts since 9/5/2006

quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink
quote:
Originally posted by 1935tb-11
quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink

Terry ..... as you probably know it is not the straight-line speed that has made the huge difference in the early cars and modern cars ....... it's the down force.  At 200 mph, the modern Indy cars could run upside down on a ceiling.  Larry mentioned the Flying Dutchman Arie Luyendyk.  I met him in 2003 after he retired at the Indy 500.  Here is a photo of him with our group.  One photo is of me and a friend right beside the Borg-Warner Trophy and in front of the car out host was sponsoring.  The other photo is in the garage with the young man in the middle who was the driver, Tony Renna.  Tony did a great job that day, as a rookie, and finished 7th in the "Cure Autism" car.  Unfortunately several months later he was killed in a crash during some tests........ tragic.


cool pics john,,,, yeah the venturi body causing negative pressure was a major development in F1 and indy cars ,, the turn speeds now are insane.  i mean 5 times its body weight in downforce,,, hard to imagine.  just think what guys in the old days could do with the cars of today.....  i just always admired mario because he could get into any type of car and win... didn't make any difference to him ,, just race it.  he is the only guy to win the indy 500. daytona 500 and a F1 championship,, pretty big feats by any standards.  here he talks about his flip at indy in 2003 at age 63 running 220 plus 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMKRvi9UPjk


Mario was an incredible driver and versatile as you have pointed out.  I have been to bunch of racing schools (Skip Barber Formula Fords), Jim Hall (Go Carts),  and Jim Russell (Rotary Engine open wheel car with wing) but have never driven a car where you really experience a downdraft.  Although the Jim Russell school was at California Motor Speedway, we drove on the inside road course and only got onto the big track straight-away for a short run.  I don't think we could really tell how much the wing was doing.  We got up to about 132 mph in the Formula Fords, but they are not designed for any down force ...... at least when I was driving them.  All of our instructors were terrific drivers and I don't think the average person or race fan understand how much skill these guys have.  Even the ones that work for BMW at their testing facility here in Greenville are darn good and make those cars do just about anything.


oh baby how i would love to take one the M5 competition monsters for a ride on the test course.   0 to 100 in 5.6   oh yes !!!

Edited by - 1935tb-11 on 09/23/2020 16:05:37

Sep 23, 2020 - 7:58:58 PM

10833 posts since 1/15/2005

quote:
Originally posted by 1935tb-11
quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink
quote:
Originally posted by 1935tb-11
quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink

Terry ..... as you probably know it is not the straight-line speed that has made the huge difference in the early cars and modern cars ....... it's the down force.  At 200 mph, the modern Indy cars could run upside down on a ceiling.  Larry mentioned the Flying Dutchman Arie Luyendyk.  I met him in 2003 after he retired at the Indy 500.  Here is a photo of him with our group.  One photo is of me and a friend right beside the Borg-Warner Trophy and in front of the car out host was sponsoring.  The other photo is in the garage with the young man in the middle who was the driver, Tony Renna.  Tony did a great job that day, as a rookie, and finished 7th in the "Cure Autism" car.  Unfortunately several months later he was killed in a crash during some tests........ tragic.


cool pics john,,,, yeah the venturi body causing negative pressure was a major development in F1 and indy cars ,, the turn speeds now are insane.  i mean 5 times its body weight in downforce,,, hard to imagine.  just think what guys in the old days could do with the cars of today.....  i just always admired mario because he could get into any type of car and win... didn't make any difference to him ,, just race it.  he is the only guy to win the indy 500. daytona 500 and a F1 championship,, pretty big feats by any standards.  here he talks about his flip at indy in 2003 at age 63 running 220 plus 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMKRvi9UPjk


Mario was an incredible driver and versatile as you have pointed out.  I have been to bunch of racing schools (Skip Barber Formula Fords), Jim Hall (Go Carts),  and Jim Russell (Rotary Engine open wheel car with wing) but have never driven a car where you really experience a downdraft.  Although the Jim Russell school was at California Motor Speedway, we drove on the inside road course and only got onto the big track straight-away for a short run.  I don't think we could really tell how much the wing was doing.  We got up to about 132 mph in the Formula Fords, but they are not designed for any down force ...... at least when I was driving them.  All of our instructors were terrific drivers and I don't think the average person or race fan understand how much skill these guys have.  Even the ones that work for BMW at their testing facility here in Greenville are darn good and make those cars do just about anything.


oh baby how i would love to take one the M5 competition monsters for a ride on the test course.   0 to 100 in 5.6   oh yes !!!


Terry ..... the M-5's are awesome.  I went to the BMW one-day school several years ago and they let us test drive just about all of the BMW sport models, but for the competition between us at the school we only got to drive the 3 series sedan which were pretty peppy.  There were ten of us so they assigned two of us to a car and one drove while the other was in the passenger seat.  The competition was called the "rat race" where they put two cars on the track at the same time each starting at a cone on opposite side of the track.  On the signal we started out and went thru several turns and then hit the "skid pad" which was wet by a sprinkler keeping asphalt soaked.  After a couple of turns on the skid pad we completed the circuit and I think went three laps.  The car back to their cone after three laps got to keep driving.  If you lost you had to switch drivers and after both drivers in that car lost another car got to race.  So each driver got to drive at least three laps.  I never lost, so I got to drive thirty laps while each of the other drivers only got three.  It was fun and my racing schools finally paid dividend.

Our last event was to put three of us in one of the fastest cars like the M-5 with one of their professional race drivers and he took around the entire road track about three or four times.  They got a big kick out of throwing the cars into the corners and sliding sideways and spinning the tires like crazy.  After all was said and done we had a little extra time and the drivers asked if anyone wanted to ride a few more laps.  I was the only one that volunteered so I asked the driver if he would take it around the track as if they were driving in a real race.  He did, and her did not slide or spin the tires in a single corner.  We got a little drift and he rotated the car some, but certainly not like the laps with the other riders.  It was an awesome day and a lot of fun.

Sep 24, 2020 - 5:14:33 AM

5787 posts since 9/5/2006

quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink
quote:
Originally posted by 1935tb-11
quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink
quote:
Originally posted by 1935tb-11
quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink

Terry ..... as you probably know it is not the straight-line speed that has made the huge difference in the early cars and modern cars ....... it's the down force.  At 200 mph, the modern Indy cars could run upside down on a ceiling.  Larry mentioned the Flying Dutchman Arie Luyendyk.  I met him in 2003 after he retired at the Indy 500.  Here is a photo of him with our group.  One photo is of me and a friend right beside the Borg-Warner Trophy and in front of the car out host was sponsoring.  The other photo is in the garage with the young man in the middle who was the driver, Tony Renna.  Tony did a great job that day, as a rookie, and finished 7th in the "Cure Autism" car.  Unfortunately several months later he was killed in a crash during some tests........ tragic.


cool pics john,,,, yeah the venturi body causing negative pressure was a major development in F1 and indy cars ,, the turn speeds now are insane.  i mean 5 times its body weight in downforce,,, hard to imagine.  just think what guys in the old days could do with the cars of today.....  i just always admired mario because he could get into any type of car and win... didn't make any difference to him ,, just race it.  he is the only guy to win the indy 500. daytona 500 and a F1 championship,, pretty big feats by any standards.  here he talks about his flip at indy in 2003 at age 63 running 220 plus 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMKRvi9UPjk


Mario was an incredible driver and versatile as you have pointed out.  I have been to bunch of racing schools (Skip Barber Formula Fords), Jim Hall (Go Carts),  and Jim Russell (Rotary Engine open wheel car with wing) but have never driven a car where you really experience a downdraft.  Although the Jim Russell school was at California Motor Speedway, we drove on the inside road course and only got onto the big track straight-away for a short run.  I don't think we could really tell how much the wing was doing.  We got up to about 132 mph in the Formula Fords, but they are not designed for any down force ...... at least when I was driving them.  All of our instructors were terrific drivers and I don't think the average person or race fan understand how much skill these guys have.  Even the ones that work for BMW at their testing facility here in Greenville are darn good and make those cars do just about anything.


oh baby how i would love to take one the M5 competition monsters for a ride on the test course.   0 to 100 in 5.6   oh yes !!!


Terry ..... the M-5's are awesome.  I went to the BMW one-day school several years ago and they let us test drive just about all of the BMW sport models, but for the competition between us at the school we only got to drive the 3 series sedan which were pretty peppy.  There were ten of us so they assigned two of us to a car and one drove while the other was in the passenger seat.  The competition was called the "rat race" where they put two cars on the track at the same time each starting at a cone on opposite side of the track.  On the signal we started out and went thru several turns and then hit the "skid pad" which was wet by a sprinkler keeping asphalt soaked.  After a couple of turns on the skid pad we completed the circuit and I think went three laps.  The car back to their cone after three laps got to keep driving.  If you lost you had to switch drivers and after both drivers in that car lost another car got to race.  So each driver got to drive at least three laps.  I never lost, so I got to drive thirty laps while each of the other drivers only got three.  It was fun and my racing schools finally paid dividend.

Our last event was to put three of us in one of the fastest cars like the M-5 with one of their professional race drivers and he took around the entire road track about three or four times.  They got a big kick out of throwing the cars into the corners and sliding sideways and spinning the tires like crazy.  After all was said and done we had a little extra time and the drivers asked if anyone wanted to ride a few more laps.  I was the only one that volunteered so I asked the driver if he would take it around the track as if they were driving in a real race.  He did, and her did not slide or spin the tires in a single corner.  We got a little drift and he rotated the car some, but certainly not like the laps with the other riders.  It was an awesome day and a lot of f un.


ME JEALOUS !!!!!

Sep 24, 2020 - 7:00:41 AM

10833 posts since 1/15/2005

quote:
Originally posted by 1935tb-11
quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink
quote:
Originally posted by 1935tb-11
quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink
quote:
Originally posted by 1935tb-11
quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink

Terry ..... as you probably know it is not the straight-line speed that has made the huge difference in the early cars and modern cars ....... it's the down force.  At 200 mph, the modern Indy cars could run upside down on a ceiling.  Larry mentioned the Flying Dutchman Arie Luyendyk.  I met him in 2003 after he retired at the Indy 500.  Here is a photo of him with our group.  One photo is of me and a friend right beside the Borg-Warner Trophy and in front of the car out host was sponsoring.  The other photo is in the garage with the young man in the middle who was the driver, Tony Renna.  Tony did a great job that day, as a rookie, and finished 7th in the "Cure Autism" car.  Unfortunately several months later he was killed in a crash during some tests........ tragic.


cool pics john,,,, yeah the venturi body causing negative pressure was a major development in F1 and indy cars ,, the turn speeds now are insane.  i mean 5 times its body weight in downforce,,, hard to imagine.  just think what guys in the old days could do with the cars of today.....  i just always admired mario because he could get into any type of car and win... didn't make any difference to him ,, just race it.  he is the only guy to win the indy 500. daytona 500 and a F1 championship,, pretty big feats by any standards.  here he talks about his flip at indy in 2003 at age 63 running 220 plus 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMKRvi9UPjk


Mario was an incredible driver and versatile as you have pointed out.  I have been to bunch of racing schools (Skip Barber Formula Fords), Jim Hall (Go Carts),  and Jim Russell (Rotary Engine open wheel car with wing) but have never driven a car where you really experience a downdraft.  Although the Jim Russell school was at California Motor Speedway, we drove on the inside road course and only got onto the big track straight-away for a short run.  I don't think we could really tell how much the wing was doing.  We got up to about 132 mph in the Formula Fords, but they are not designed for any down force ...... at least when I was driving them.  All of our instructors were terrific drivers and I don't think the average person or race fan understand how much skill these guys have.  Even the ones that work for BMW at their testing facility here in Greenville are darn good and make those cars do just about anything.


oh baby how i would love to take one the M5 competition monsters for a ride on the test course.   0 to 100 in 5.6   oh yes !!!


Terry ..... the M-5's are awesome.  I went to the BMW one-day school several years ago and they let us test drive just about all of the BMW sport models, but for the competition between us at the school we only got to drive the 3 series sedan which were pretty peppy.  There were ten of us so they assigned two of us to a car and one drove while the other was in the passenger seat.  The competition was called the "rat race" where they put two cars on the track at the same time each starting at a cone on opposite side of the track.  On the signal we started out and went thru several turns and then hit the "skid pad" which was wet by a sprinkler keeping asphalt soaked.  After a couple of turns on the skid pad we completed the circuit and I think went three laps.  The car back to their cone after three laps got to keep driving.  If you lost you had to switch drivers and after both drivers in that car lost another car got to race.  So each driver got to drive at least three laps.  I never lost, so I got to drive thirty laps while each of the other drivers only got three.  It was fun and my racing schools finally paid dividend.

Our last event was to put three of us in one of the fastest cars like the M-5 with one of their professional race drivers and he took around the entire road track about three or four times.  They got a big kick out of throwing the cars into the corners and sliding sideways and spinning the tires like crazy.  After all was said and done we had a little extra time and the drivers asked if anyone wanted to ride a few more laps.  I was the only one that volunteered so I asked the driver if he would take it around the track as if they were driving in a real race.  He did, and her did not slide or spin the tires in a single corner.  We got a little drift and he rotated the car some, but certainly not like the laps with the other riders.  It was an awesome day and a lot of f un.


ME JEALOUS !!!!!


Terry ..... I was lucky that I was in a business where we had suppliers who arranged for these trips to racing schools as a reward (bribesmiley) for specifying their products, so I never had to pay for a single one, except the Jim Hall Racing School, where we learned to race go carts.  It was really funny, but at the Hall school they had a big board in the classroom that had the names of all the well known NASCAR and Indy drivers that had attended his school.  I guess they all wanted to learn more about road racing for the races that both the NASCAR and Indy series do a couple of times a year.  Funny they went to a go cart school, but they taught us exactly like the Formula Ford schools that I attended.  At one of the Barber Formula Ford schools, one of the instructors said they had recently had several Indy drivers attend, but since they already "knew it all" they had to basically let them teach themselves and only offer suggestions.

I don't know if you remember Boris Said who used to drive as a substitute driver for some of the NASCAR teams when they raced at Watkins Glen and Sonoma.  For a year or two he drove more races in NASCAR including Daytona.  Boris was one of our first instructors at Skip Barber and was quite an interesting character.  He never did particularly well in the NASCAR road races mainly because I always thought he was too aggressive and wound up wrecking ..... or wrecking someone else.

Sep 24, 2020 - 8:47:40 AM

73335 posts since 5/9/2007

quote:
Originally posted by 1935tb-11

and to think with all of todays technology and the 100 of millions they spend on development and testing and building they have only picked up about 45 MPHs on the 50s F1 cars (straight line speed),,,, shows how good the old ones were.

 i was always a big mario fan,,, after doing reading up on him i found out his idol was ascari. after ascari died ,, mario used him as an inspiration to become the driver he did.   most around here were big petty ,pearson,, foyt,,etc fans as i was but,,,,  but mario always kept my attention.


New rules and technology are much better,now.Thank God the danger of fiery injuries and deaths from gas tanks and carburetors have been,for all intents and purposes,eliminated by the "bladder" and fuel injection technologies.

The upcoming electric technology will blow away the internal combustion engine in all categories.

F5000 cars of the 70s did nearly 250 mph with HP around 1500.Today's F! cars are limited to around 1000HP...not because they can't build it to 2,000HP.It's that it's not allowed.We can engineer an F1 style car to do 400 mph.We don't because that kind of performance is beyond the capabilities of tracks and drivers.

Edited by - steve davis on 09/24/2020 08:52:11

Sep 24, 2020 - 8:57:30 AM

73335 posts since 5/9/2007

Beautiful models,Larry.
I spent many hours racing slot cars as a kid.
I'm tempted to get back into it after seeing your work.

Sep 24, 2020 - 2:23:08 PM

5787 posts since 9/5/2006

quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink
quote:
Originally posted by 1935tb-11
quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink
quote:
Originally posted by 1935tb-11
quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink
quote:
Originally posted by 1935tb-11
quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink

Terry ..... as you probably know it is not the straight-line speed that has made the huge difference in the early cars and modern cars ....... it's the down force.  At 200 mph, the modern Indy cars could run upside down on a ceiling.  Larry mentioned the Flying Dutchman Arie Luyendyk.  I met him in 2003 after he retired at the Indy 500.  Here is a photo of him with our group.  One photo is of me and a friend right beside the Borg-Warner Trophy and in front of the car out host was sponsoring.  The other photo is in the garage with the young man in the middle who was the driver, Tony Renna.  Tony did a great job that day, as a rookie, and finished 7th in the "Cure Autism" car.  Unfortunately several months later he was killed in a crash during some tests........ tragic.


cool pics john,,,, yeah the venturi body causing negative pressure was a major development in F1 and indy cars ,, the turn speeds now are insane.  i mean 5 times its body weight in downforce,,, hard to imagine.  just think what guys in the old days could do with the cars of today.....  i just always admired mario because he could get into any type of car and win... didn't make any difference to him ,, just race it.  he is the only guy to win the indy 500. daytona 500 and a F1 championship,, pretty big feats by any standards.  here he talks about his flip at indy in 2003 at age 63 running 220 plus 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMKRvi9UPjk


Mario was an incredible driver and versatile as you have pointed out.  I have been to bunch of racing schools (Skip Barber Formula Fords), Jim Hall (Go Carts),  and Jim Russell (Rotary Engine open wheel car with wing) but have never driven a car where you really experience a downdraft.  Although the Jim Russell school was at California Motor Speedway, we drove on the inside road course and only got onto the big track straight-away for a short run.  I don't think we could really tell how much the wing was doing.  We got up to about 132 mph in the Formula Fords, but they are not designed for any down force ...... at least when I was driving them.  All of our instructors were terrific drivers and I don't think the average person or race fan understand how much skill these guys have.  Even the ones that work for BMW at their testing facility here in Greenville are darn good and make those cars do just about anything.


oh baby how i would love to take one the M5 competition monsters for a ride on the test course.   0 to 100 in 5.6   oh yes !!!


Terry ..... the M-5's are awesome.  I went to the BMW one-day school several years ago and they let us test drive just about all of the BMW sport models, but for the competition between us at the school we only got to drive the 3 series sedan which were pretty peppy.  There were ten of us so they assigned two of us to a car and one drove while the other was in the passenger seat.  The competition was called the "rat race" where they put two cars on the track at the same time each starting at a cone on opposite side of the track.  On the signal we started out and went thru several turns and then hit the "skid pad" which was wet by a sprinkler keeping asphalt soaked.  After a couple of turns on the skid pad we completed the circuit and I think went three laps.  The car back to their cone after three laps got to keep driving.  If you lost you had to switch drivers and after both drivers in that car lost another car got to race.  So each driver got to drive at least three laps.  I never lost, so I got to drive thirty laps while each of the other drivers only got three.  It was fun and my racing schools finally paid dividend.

Our last event was to put three of us in one of the fastest cars like the M-5 with one of their professional race drivers and he took around the entire road track about three or four times.  They got a big kick out of throwing the cars into the corners and sliding sideways and spinning the tires like crazy.  After all was said and done we had a little extra time and the drivers asked if anyone wanted to ride a few more laps.  I was the only one that volunteered so I asked the driver if he would take it around the track as if they were driving in a real race.  He did, and her did not slide or spin the tires in a single corner.  We got a little drift and he rotated the car some, but certainly not like the laps with the other riders.  It was an awesome day and a lot of f un.


ME JEALOUS !!!!!


Terry ..... I was lucky that I was in a business where we had suppliers who arranged for these trips to racing schools as a reward (bribesmiley) for specifying their products, so I never had to pay for a single one, except the Jim Hall Racing School, where we learned to race go carts.  It was really funny, but at the Hall school they had a big board in the classroom that had the names of all the well known NASCAR and Indy drivers that had attended his school.  I guess they all wanted to learn more about road racing for the races that both the NASCAR and Indy series do a couple of times a year.  Funny they went to a go cart school, but they taught us exactly like the Formula Ford schools that I attended.  At one of the Barber Formula Ford schools, one of the instructors said they had recently had several Indy drivers attend, but since they already "knew it all" they had to basically let them teach themselves and only offer suggestions.

I don't know if you remember Boris Said who used to drive as a substitute driver for some of the NASCAR teams when they raced at Watkins Glen and Sonoma.  For a year or two he drove more races in NASCAR including Daytona.  Boris was one of our first instructors at Skip Barber and was quite an interesting character.  He never did particularly well in the NASCAR road races mainly because I always thought he was too aggressive and wound up wrecking ..... or wrecking someone else.


oh yes i remember boris,,, best hair in nascar !!

Sep 24, 2020 - 2:33:14 PM
likes this

10833 posts since 1/15/2005

quote:
Originally posted by 1935tb-11
quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink
quote:
Originally posted by 1935tb-11
quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink
quote:
Originally posted by 1935tb-11
quote:
Originally posted by BanjoLink
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Originally posted by 1935tb-11
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Originally posted by BanjoLink

Terry ..... as you probably know it is not the straight-line speed that has made the huge difference in the early cars and modern cars ....... it's the down force.  At 200 mph, the modern Indy cars could run upside down on a ceiling.  Larry mentioned the Flying Dutchman Arie Luyendyk.  I met him in 2003 after he retired at the Indy 500.  Here is a photo of him with our group.  One photo is of me and a friend right beside the Borg-Warner Trophy and in front of the car out host was sponsoring.  The other photo is in the garage with the young man in the middle who was the driver, Tony Renna.  Tony did a great job that day, as a rookie, and finished 7th in the "Cure Autism" car.  Unfortunately several months later he was killed in a crash during some tests........ tragic.


cool pics john,,,, yeah the venturi body causing negative pressure was a major development in F1 and indy cars ,, the turn speeds now are insane.  i mean 5 times its body weight in downforce,,, hard to imagine.  just think what guys in the old days could do with the cars of today.....  i just always admired mario because he could get into any type of car and win... didn't make any difference to him ,, just race it.  he is the only guy to win the indy 500. daytona 500 and a F1 championship,, pretty big feats by any standards.  here he talks about his flip at indy in 2003 at age 63 running 220 plus 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMKRvi9UPjk


Mario was an incredible driver and versatile as you have pointed out.  I have been to bunch of racing schools (Skip Barber Formula Fords), Jim Hall (Go Carts),  and Jim Russell (Rotary Engine open wheel car with wing) but have never driven a car where you really experience a downdraft.  Although the Jim Russell school was at California Motor Speedway, we drove on the inside road course and only got onto the big track straight-away for a short run.  I don't think we could really tell how much the wing was doing.  We got up to about 132 mph in the Formula Fords, but they are not designed for any down force ...... at least when I was driving them.  All of our instructors were terrific drivers and I don't think the average person or race fan understand how much skill these guys have.  Even the ones that work for BMW at their testing facility here in Greenville are darn good and make those cars do just about anything.


oh baby how i would love to take one the M5 competition monsters for a ride on the test course.   0 to 100 in 5.6   oh yes !!!


Terry ..... the M-5's are awesome.  I went to the BMW one-day school several years ago and they let us test drive just about all of the BMW sport models, but for the competition between us at the school we only got to drive the 3 series sedan which were pretty peppy.  There were ten of us so they assigned two of us to a car and one drove while the other was in the passenger seat.  The competition was called the "rat race" where they put two cars on the track at the same time each starting at a cone on opposite side of the track.  On the signal we started out and went thru several turns and then hit the "skid pad" which was wet by a sprinkler keeping asphalt soaked.  After a couple of turns on the skid pad we completed the circuit and I think went three laps.  The car back to their cone after three laps got to keep driving.  If you lost you had to switch drivers and after both drivers in that car lost another car got to race.  So each driver got to drive at least three laps.  I never lost, so I got to drive thirty laps while each of the other drivers only got three.  It was fun and my racing schools finally paid dividend.

Our last event was to put three of us in one of the fastest cars like the M-5 with one of their professional race drivers and he took around the entire road track about three or four times.  They got a big kick out of throwing the cars into the corners and sliding sideways and spinning the tires like crazy.  After all was said and done we had a little extra time and the drivers asked if anyone wanted to ride a few more laps.  I was the only one that volunteered so I asked the driver if he would take it around the track as if they were driving in a real race.  He did, and her did not slide or spin the tires in a single corner.  We got a little drift and he rotated the car some, but certainly not like the laps with the other riders.  It was an awesome day and a lot of f un.


ME JEALOUS !!!!!


Terry ..... I was lucky that I was in a business where we had suppliers who arranged for these trips to racing schools as a reward (bribesmiley) for specifying their products, so I never had to pay for a single one, except the Jim Hall Racing School, where we learned to race go carts.  It was really funny, but at the Hall school they had a big board in the classroom that had the names of all the well known NASCAR and Indy drivers that had attended his school.  I guess they all wanted to learn more about road racing for the races that both the NASCAR and Indy series do a couple of times a year.  Funny they went to a go cart school, but they taught us exactly like the Formula Ford schools that I attended.  At one of the Barber Formula Ford schools, one of the instructors said they had recently had several Indy drivers attend, but since they already "knew it all" they had to basically let them teach themselves and only offer suggestions.

I don't know if you remember Boris Said who used to drive as a substitute driver for some of the NASCAR teams when they raced at Watkins Glen and Sonoma.  For a year or two he drove more races in NASCAR including Daytona.  Boris was one of our first instructors at Skip Barber and was quite an interesting character.  He never did particularly well in the NASCAR road races mainly because I always thought he was too aggressive and wound up wrecking ..... or wrecking someone else.


oh yes i remember boris,,, best hair in nascar !!


He was as nutty as he looked ...... good guy.  We taught him how to hit a golf ball when we were at the Barber school in Lime Rock ...... and he taught us to drive race cars.

Sep 25, 2020 - 3:36:12 AM

Helix

USA

12938 posts since 8/30/2006

steve davis Thank you Steve, when I was a kid, the Maserati 250F was a 1:24 kit, it was all there was. By the time I was 18 and going in the army there were the Vanwall and the Mercedes. I was making toothpick frames and using the engines and driver and suspensions to make my own.

1:24 as a racing format is huge like your whole garage. I have only 48" x 65" to work with so I have extra banjo rims under towels to make 65' climbs, turn and drop downhill.

The new supermagnets give great control. The 1/32 controllers let you have HO brakes which is unheard of, usually run-coast, I mentioned that in the first post. Brakes are reversing the motor polarity which doesn't hurt anything, nor wear the motor at all.

I have mentioned the use of dry ice fog and black lights, but I think that's a little too head trippy for some people, Yellow noses on racecars were used because Yellow is the first color visible through the fog. When fog is present on your racetrack, the next thing you want to do is use new lithium ion batteries to give bright headlights that don't dim when you use the trigger.

I didn't show my short wheelbase Le Mans cars.

I'm going to make a tribute to the STP turbine indy car. I subscribed to Autoweek, I use their photos.

The plastic cars are 13 g. My paper car body is only 11g. The bamboo bodies are up in the 16-18g. range which adds real momentum while driving them, you get to spool them up, and run difficult laps. I have towels clothespinned up as car catchers.  Ho has the best wrecks, I saw a tire bouncing down the track.  I have a peanut gallery of spectators, but the other day, they got hit by a car. 

I learned how to make the "Goodyear" logo on the tires really pop. It took me two years to figure out the "theater" of it , these little puppet toys. I ain't gonna show ya, yet.

I enjoy being a catalyst and stimulating discussion, must have opened up somebody's hard boiled head to bring back really good adult memories.
The depth of peoples' knowledge and interests is very valuable during shut in, down, off, out. Hang in there everybody.

Aetna is imminent, might slow down Alfa production.

Edited by - Helix on 09/25/2020 03:50:07

Sep 25, 2020 - 4:37:54 AM

Helix

USA

12938 posts since 8/30/2006

And by the way, I’m glad you’re excitable
Please don’t kill this thread with too much copy we see this on other threads and forums
It just makes it unreadable
I don’t wish to stop and lose momentum

Thanks. Back to the HO cars

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