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Sep 17, 2020 - 1:35:56 AM
33 posts since 8/17/2020

Silly question I agree but as a guitar player, I naturally put the head on my right leg. Gravity takes over and I struggle to get comfortable.

I am thinking of a strap or is there a gismo available to make the banjo perch on my right knee like a guitar?

Seg

Sep 17, 2020 - 1:43:39 AM
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phb

Germany

2214 posts since 11/8/2010

A strap is a must. When sitting, I place the banjo drum on both legs.

Sep 17, 2020 - 3:19:46 AM

532 posts since 2/15/2015

Deering website has a lot of relevant info.

deeringbanjos.com/blogs/banjo-...technique

Edited by - geoB on 09/17/2020 03:20:59

Sep 17, 2020 - 3:40:36 AM

4904 posts since 5/14/2007

There area couple schools of thought. One is to put the pot, the body, in your lap between your legs. I did this for many years, but a while back changed over to the other school, with the pot on the right thigh, and held in place with a little pressure with my right forearm. There shouldn't be very much support with the left hand. I find this position keeps my hands in better playing position. I don't use a strap, but if I used a banjo with a resonator I might need one.

Sep 17, 2020 - 4:14:22 AM
Players Union Member

dbrooks

USA

3918 posts since 3/11/2004

A strap installed carefully will support the neck so that your left (or fretting) hand does not have that task. Attach one end of the strap a bracket or two below the tailpiece and the other end of the strap a bracket below the heel of the neck. The strap will tend to support the neck by lifting up the heel. I place the pot on my right thigh, but plenty of others put the pot squarely in their lap.

David

Sep 17, 2020 - 4:37:07 AM

3022 posts since 4/29/2012

I play with a strap whether sitting or standing. I keep the banjo head off to the right either on my right thigh or tucked under my right arm. I find this works best with a typical clawhammer "strike zone" just above or below the neck/head junction. But that's me. You may find a different position more comfortable.

Sep 17, 2020 - 5:08:57 AM

22 posts since 10/23/2011

People never listen to this advice, but I'll say it anyway. Always practice standing.

Sep 17, 2020 - 5:51:01 AM

3022 posts since 4/29/2012

quote:
Originally posted by Flaw Hamwrist

People never listen to this advice, but I'll say it anyway. Always practice standing.


I wouldn't go as far as "always". But being able to play standing is a useful skill, which not everybody has. And it does take practice.

Sep 17, 2020 - 5:57:14 AM

5729 posts since 9/21/2007

Many modern banjos are neck heavy-- open back banjos with steel trusses and geared pegs can be a problem. This is also a problem for people who put geared pegs on very light banjos like Stewarts. The banjos become unbalanced and one ends up supporting the neck with the left hand-- then you get the club grip with the thumb over the top.

There were a few attachment gizmos patented and marketed in the past with little success to assist in this-- these are sort of like the attachments that many Spanish "classical" guitar players use today.

There would be a potential market for this sort of attachment if someone were inclined to pursue developing one and manufacturing it.

Sep 17, 2020 - 6:09:55 AM

22 posts since 10/23/2011

quote:
Originally posted by AndrewD
quote:
Originally posted by Flaw Hamwrist

People never listen to this advice, but I'll say it anyway. Always practice standing.


I wouldn't go as far as "always". But being able to play standing is a useful skill, which not everybody has. And it does take practice.


It's easy to play seated and it's more difficult to play standing.  Always practicing standing gives me the ability to play live standing and it's even easier to play seated which I only do when recording.  I stand by it, people practice seated too much.

Sep 17, 2020 - 9:54:29 AM

AndyW

UK

609 posts since 7/4/2017

I play with the pot on my right hand thigh. The neck needs to be steadied with a touch of pressure from the right forearm.

The benefit of playing pot on thigh is that the neck is brought closer to the body and the left arm tires less easily. There's loads of people play pot in lap though, but they tend to need to angle the neck up to balance it or use a strap to help steady.

At first when playing pot on rh thigh it is not easy to get the rh forearm pressure correct, and squeezing too hard can dig the metalware into your thigh. However after a while (and it's one of those adjustments that takes a bit of time) you learn to hold the pot with just enough pressure. During the 'learning' stage a small cushion under the pot can stave off the metalware problem.

Sep 18, 2020 - 10:35:39 AM

1303 posts since 2/9/2007

I never use a strap when seated, but have taught a lot of beginners, and most of them have found a strap to be helpful. Do whatever works best for you.

The banjo sits on my right thigh. Just where depends a lot on the size, shape, and balance of the one I'm playing. It's most usually well to the right, with the neck nearly horizontal and angled considerably forward (my left hand in first position is more or less over my left knee). The pot is held (loosely) by my thigh, chest (or abdomen if it's a small banjo) and forearm (contacting near, or even on, the tailpiece).

Sep 19, 2020 - 1:09:27 AM

33 posts since 8/17/2020

I think I need a strap, any recommendations and anything to avoid?

I don't mind paying a little extra for quality.

I see Deering have a range of straps

Must be purchased in UK or Europe region

Sep 19, 2020 - 1:51:58 AM
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3022 posts since 4/29/2012

quote:
Originally posted by Segovia123

I think I need a strap, any recommendations and anything to avoid?

I don't mind paying a little extra for quality.

I see Deering have a range of straps

Must be purchased in UK or Europe region


Do a Google for "klondyke cradle strap". That's what I use. Nice sheepskin shoulder pad. Slim cradle that fits a shoe-and-bolt open back. I got mine onllne from a shop in Scotland. But they seem to be available from the usual suspects (Eagle, Thomann....)

Sep 21, 2020 - 12:18:53 AM

AndyW

UK

609 posts since 7/4/2017

Since you are a guitar player, a guitar strap and a couple of bits of string/laces should do for now whilst you figure out whether you need a strap or not.

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