Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

358
Banjo Lovers Online


Want to hide these Google ads? Join the Players Union!
Sep 8, 2020 - 12:52:45 PM
509 posts since 8/14/2015

How does one play a dotted quarter note triplet? A triplet with an 8th note or just the triplet or don’t play the triplet at all.

I already asked this question in the 4 string section, but couldn’t get it off — my bad, sorry.

Sep 8, 2020 - 1:14:20 PM

kww

USA

605 posts since 6/21/2008

a dotted quarter note = 3 eighth notes, so it's a regular eighth note rhythm, but you keep the triplet emphasis pattern, i.e you are in 4/4 time and and had

A C E G E C as the note sequence, then with dotted quarter triplets, it would be

A C E G E C

while as eighth notes it would be

A C E G E C

Edited by - kww on 09/08/2020 13:15:15

Sep 8, 2020 - 3:31:32 PM

Alex Z

USA

3944 posts since 12/7/2006

Are you playing Irish music or classical music?

In the Irish style, are you playing a jig or a reel?

And where is the triplet -- on the beat?

The reason to distinguish is that in some styles the as written (with the dot) and the as played are different.  The written is just an indication of how to play.  For example, jazz "swing" time.    Whereas classical music is generally more precise with the notation of actual timing.

So give an example, and I think someone can be of help.

Sep 8, 2020 - 6:27:33 PM

509 posts since 8/14/2015

Irish music and the dotted quarter note is usually at the end of a section. There’s one in the second measure of the reel “Lady Anne Montgomery. It goes f-a-d-a dotted b and an eight note. “The Banshee” starts off with a dotted low g followed by eighth note d.

The ones I’m askin’ about are mostly in reels. However, a dotted quarter note is a dotted quarter note, I guess, and can all be played the same way — but how?

Sep 8, 2020 - 7:26:35 PM

kww

USA

605 posts since 6/21/2008

I think I misread your question: you have a triplet, but each note in the triplet is a dotted quarter? Or you just have the combination of a dotted quarter followed by an eighth note and you aren't sure how to play it?

Sep 9, 2020 - 1:26:18 AM

3019 posts since 10/17/2009

quote:
Originally posted by Picking Dick

How does one play a dotted quarter note triplet? A triplet with an 8th note or just the triplet or don’t play the triplet at all.

I already asked this question in the 4 string section, but couldn’t get it off — my bad, sorry.


 

quote:
Originally posted by Picking Dick

Irish music and the dotted quarter note is usually at the end of a section. There’s one in the second measure of the reel “Lady Anne Montgomery. It goes f-a-d-a dotted b and an eight note. “The Banshee” starts off with a dotted low g followed by eighth note d.

The ones I’m askin’ about are mostly in reels. However, a dotted quarter note is a dotted quarter note, I guess, and can all be played the same way — but how?


Not sure what you asking exactly. The notation says a dotted quarter, is just that, the duration until the next note; not a triplet or 3 eighth notes. 

Triplets in Irish music can be put in, as rhythmic ornaments... not really about the duration until the next note, nor the tempo.  Your example though might be easier thought of as more as triplet, over about space of quarter note; followed by a eighth note rest; then the next eighth note.

edit: not sure that would work for the Banshee... what is more common is perhaps an eight note followed by a triplet.

Edited by - banjoak on 09/09/2020 01:40:28

Sep 9, 2020 - 6:48:37 AM

509 posts since 8/14/2015

Yeah, banjoak, either way sounds okay, I guess. I’ve been playin’ it triplet - 8th note, but 8th - triplet would probably work just as well if not better. Triplet - rest would also work.

I just wondered if there was a correct way or rule. Thanks, All, for the help.

Sep 9, 2020 - 8:07:35 AM

DSmoke

USA

870 posts since 11/30/2015

benhockenberry can probably help here. I don't really understand music theory but in Irish music the triplet takes the place of 2 notes. I also think a rest after the triplet will ruin the flow of the music.

Sep 9, 2020 - 9:29:11 AM

3019 posts since 10/17/2009

quote:
Originally posted by DSmoke

benhockenberry can probably help here. I don't really understand music theory but in Irish music the triplet takes the place of 2 notes. I also think a rest after the triplet will ruin the flow of the music.


Might of misinterpreted.  Rest is just more of a visualization... The example was written half a measure with a dotted quarter and an eighth or = 3/8  + 1/8.

The triplet doesn't take the place of any value of 2 notes... but rather in example as this, the value of 2 eighth notes (or quarter note). That leaves one eighth remainder that is neither part of the triplet nor the following eighth.  (note if written in 2/4, values would be over 2 sixteenth notes)

I’ve been playin’ it triplet - 8th note, but 8th - triplet would probably work just as well if not better. Triplet - rest would also work.

Again seem to have misinterpreted what I said, as above the triplet takes the place of a quarter note. Can think  of it this way... theoretically each part of the triplet has value of 1/12th note. (in practice it's can be little different, some slightly shorter). But again it's more of ornament substitute than exact timed value. 

I just wondered if there was a correct way or rule.

Again it's mostly as a rhythmic ornament, so the correct, way or rule is it's about what sound good or appropriate to the style.

 or don’t play the triplet at all.

That actually might be a good idea. Generally not a good idea to just throw ornaments in haphazardly, IMO I think you just need to listen to music and absorb the essence of them.

Edited by - banjoak on 09/09/2020 09:36:05

Sep 9, 2020 - 4:31:40 PM

196 posts since 11/26/2004

Thanks for the tag, @DSmoke! I don't claim to be an expert, but I wrote up some notated examples to answer a question about triplet placement in reels and jigs a few months ago on another forum, so I'm happy to share. These don't explicitly mention the dotted quarter note case, though, so I'll explain.

Dropbox link to notated example: dropbox.com/s/4rox8vd439gzox9/....png?dl=0

Basically, a bar of a reel's rhythm can be broken into four units of two eighth notes. You can replace any of those four chunks with a triplet, as you like. But if you go across the boundaries of those units, the rhythm sounds less "reel-like." That doesn't make it "bad," it's just not where a triplet fits as well within the style.

For a reel, this means the placement of a triplet to subdivide a dotted quarter depends on where in the bar the dotted quarter sits. If it's like the first bar of Longford Collector (starts on the dotted quarter) then the triplet would go at the very start of the bar.
In ABC:
G3A Bcdg becomes (3GGG GA Bcdg

If it's a tune like Jackie Coleman's (eighth followed by the dotted quarter) then the triplet would best fall toward the end.
In ABC:
AF3 EFDE becomes AF (3FFF EFDE

Jigs are a different case. You can triplet in two places within a three-note grouping, as in the notated examples, and not "break the jig rhythm."

Edited by - benhockenberry on 09/09/2020 16:36:57

Sep 10, 2020 - 1:45:29 AM
likes this

Tony O Rourke

Australia

34 posts since 2/9/2016

Taking your example of the start of ''The Banshee'' , with a dotted quarter note G, I would play an eighth note triplet G(Down/Up/Down) and then an eighth note G(Down) and then a D eighth note(Up). That's for banjo. If I could play an accordion I might just hold the G for the full one and a half beats, but that does'nt always sound right on a banjo; there's not much sustain on the instrument. If there's a dotted quarter note in a jig I would often play an eighth note triplet(DUD) followed by a normal eight note(D), based on the way I pick jigs: DUD DUD etc.

Sep 10, 2020 - 10:26:10 AM

509 posts since 8/14/2015

Yeah, Tony, that’s the way I play it. Either that or simply not play a triplet at all. Thanks for the help.

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.203125