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I was repairing an old toy and the 2004 batteries were still alive.

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Sep 5, 2020 - 8:57:29 AM
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Banjo

USA

6808 posts since 2/18/2003

I was repairing an old toy and the batteries were still alive.

 

Edited by - Banjo on 09/05/2020 09:05:47

Sep 6, 2020 - 3:32:44 PM

donc

Canada

6425 posts since 2/9/2010

In 2014 Zeller's closed all their stores here. They were selling Timex watches at 30% off. I am not kind to watches so a $25 Timex was as good as I deserved. About a month ago the battery finally expired. Many of us grew up with lead acid batteries. If you had a battery operated bike light it was good for about 5 night shift commutes. The newer bike batteries will last for several months. The modern day lithium batteries seem to last about 10 times longer. I sure Mr. Musk is continuing to stretch out the life of newer batteries so he can put the gas guzzlers out of business.

Sep 6, 2020 - 4:17:48 PM

DRH

USA

541 posts since 5/29/2018

Shelf life of an alkaline cell is mostly a matter of ingredients. When Gillette bought Duracell the new management switched to cheaper chemicals and battery life declined. They eventually went back to the good stuff after Rayovac and Energizer took market share at Duracell's expense.

Some states now require non-replaceable batteries in smoke alarms. In some states the battery must be guaranteed for 10 years. Long shelf life is easy if you don't mind the cost.

Sep 6, 2020 - 7:53:55 PM
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

17058 posts since 6/5/2008

Voltages and Amperages are theoretical.
The implication is that the purity of the chemicals makes the battery do what it does.
Purification is very costly.

Consumer Reports, years ago, claimed that with batteries, you get what you pay for.

1. You can kill them with current sucking badly designed circuitry.
2. In this day and time, dump incandescent lights for LED if your application will work that way.

Sep 8, 2020 - 5:42:55 AM

mander

USA

4393 posts since 10/7/2007

We had a speaking toy pirate that had lithium batteries. One of the boys dropped it through a small hole in the wall. I wasn't going to tear the wall apart to get a toy. Unfortunately, it landed on it's button. For six months... "Load and Fire! Load and Fire! Load and Fire!" 24/7. It wasn't loud, but it was definitely a test of nerves.

Sep 8, 2020 - 10:57:58 AM

DRH

USA

541 posts since 5/29/2018

quote:
Originally posted by Brian T

Voltages and Amperages are theoretical.
The implication is that the purity of the chemicals makes the battery do what it does.
Purification is very costly.

Consumer Reports, years ago, claimed that with batteries, you get what you pay for.

1. You can kill them with current sucking badly designed circuitry.
2. In this day and time, dump incandescent lights for LED if your application will work that way.


Purity does have an effect on capacity, shelf life, and cost.  There are also some mystery ingredients that are extremely costly.  The only one I was privy to was Iriduim. 

I acquired two empty short drums (30 gallon) from the dumpster that had contained Iridium.  One of the engineers told me one drum of iridium cost more than a nice house. 

"Get what you pay for" is probably still valid.  9-volt batteries from Harbor Freight are 70% of a name brand, both in cost and capacity.

If you buy bulk packs of name brand batteries from ebay and then wonder why they don't hold up it's because most of them are fakes.  Counterfeit batteries are big business these days.

Sep 8, 2020 - 11:34:37 AM
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

17058 posts since 6/5/2008

I got to tour a lead-acid battery recycling plant. Everything gets used.
They smashed 5,000 batteries per day.

The pure lead plates were reduced to rice-sized lumps and back to the plate makers,
the quality meant they could buy lower grade lead and bring it up to some purity standard with the recycled stuff.

I buy AA maybe a dozen at a time at most.
Our recycle place closed and I have maybe a shoe box of dead(?) batteries on my shelf.

Sep 8, 2020 - 11:13:19 PM

2166 posts since 1/16/2010

I found an early 70’s Motorola HT440 Portable 2 way radio a few months ago in an old drawer at work. I thought for sure that the rechargeable battery would be shot. However when I put the radio on the charger...it charged up and has been holding a charge and working fine the last several months.

Why can’t they make them like that anymore?

Sep 9, 2020 - 4:24:59 AM

3646 posts since 12/6/2009

I had a watch given to me many years ago. once a week I'd wind it up and it lasted 5/6 years. then one day it stopped. happened to ask someone about watches one day he asked to look at it.....said the battery was dead....lol I never knew it was a battery watch....I really thought I was winding it up....I wasn't doing anything by winding it. ... anyway put a knew battery in it (the watch guy at Sears did)...the thing lasted another 4 years before it died completely. The watch man at Sears said it was a cheap watch and not worth trying to repair it.

 my parents lived in a house where a closet light bulb which got used almost every day....lasted at least 17 years that we know of.

another battery story. we worked in an old house where the not so bright carpenter sheet-rocked over a battery smoke detector......when the battery started going bad it started to beep.......that beep lasted over a year. it wasn't loud and you had to be in the hall way to hear it.....but no-one wanted to start making holes to try and find it.....

Edited by - overhere on 09/09/2020 04:36:09

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