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Old Banjo Painting ...........

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Aug 14, 2020 - 3:46:10 PM
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10644 posts since 1/15/2005

https://brunkauctions.com/lot/eastman-johnson-4026723

This would go nicely with some of you guys collections ...... especially those that like the 19th century banjos!
 

Aug 14, 2020 - 4:34:19 PM

1058 posts since 5/19/2018
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Hmmm.....75,000$ - 150,000$ painting of a banjo....

That can sure equal a solid collection of the real thing.

Very unique and interesting painting though.

Thanks for posting

Aug 14, 2020 - 5:53:12 PM

10644 posts since 1/15/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Alvin Conder

Hmmm.....75,000$ - 150,000$ painting of a banjo....

That can sure equal a solid collection of the real thing.

Very unique and interesting painting though.

Thanks for posting


Alvin, the painting is dated prior to the Civil War and really wondered if the banjo is pretty representative of the banjos built during that era.  I don't know how it couldn't be, unless the painter was using a lot of artistic license.

Aug 14, 2020 - 6:37:38 PM
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84 posts since 2/11/2009

This wonderful 1859 painting coming up for auction was done as a study for the central part a much more ambitious work painted later in the same year. 


Aug 14, 2020 - 9:09:20 PM
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10644 posts since 1/15/2005

quote:
Originally posted by mmm Bacon

This wonderful 1859 painting coming up for auction was done as a study for the central part a much more ambitious work painted later in the same year. 

 


It is indeed a wonderful painting!

Aug 15, 2020 - 1:20:34 AM
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Bill Rogers (Moderator)

USA

23880 posts since 6/25/2005

Let’s hope it winds up in a museum so we rabble can see it displayed.

Aug 15, 2020 - 4:57:47 AM
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1058 posts since 5/19/2018
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Banjolink- I would say that is indeed a solid representation of what a banjo would look like at the time that painting was executed. It’s one of the few contemporary works of art that I have seen that depicted the banjo accurately, so to us musicians, I say it’s a pretty important work of art.

Given the subject, it really should be in a museum for the public and the future to be able to see and study.

Aug 15, 2020 - 5:57:52 AM
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Players Union Member

DC5

USA

13003 posts since 6/30/2015

If you like the painting and cannot afford the original, you can get a print for $22, or more if you want a larger size and in a frame.

art.com/products/p13946841-sa-...ation.htm

I have a print of the William Sidney Mount painting "The Banjo Player" and it looks great in my living room.


 

Aug 15, 2020 - 7:58:21 AM

10644 posts since 1/15/2005

I thought that the banjo depiction was pretty accurate ..... something that is even overlooked by more modern artists. In recent years museums have been buying from auctions such as this for their collections ..... especially those African-American related articles. I collect Edgefield (SC) pottery that was slave made from about 1820 to 1860's (end of Civil War) and recently a museum bought a "Dave" signed stoneware storage jar from this same auction house for almost $200,000. There are reports that some of Dave's larger vessels with a two line poem (couplet) inscribed on the are reaching close to $1,000,000. I could have bought one in the 1980 for $15,000.

Aug 16, 2020 - 7:50:39 PM

RevD

USA

120 posts since 4/8/2019

If I could get it in velvet I'd be set....


 

Aug 17, 2020 - 8:40:47 AM
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10644 posts since 1/15/2005

quote:
Originally posted by RevD

If I could get it in velvet I'd be set....


Would look great next to a velvet Elvis!

Aug 17, 2020 - 8:52:53 AM
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Jbo1

USA

949 posts since 5/19/2007

RevD , Dogs don't play banjo. Dogs play poker. (neat painting though)

Aug 17, 2020 - 2:45:03 PM

189 posts since 4/17/2015

We got a chance to see the larger canvas, just by chance, on a road trip in 2016, at the Denver Art Museum hosted show "Dance: American Art, 1830-1960". While not banjo-centric, this exhibit was accompanied by a very nice catalog as well. There is a dedicated section on "The Black Presence in the Art of American Dance".

It is always a treat to see original art, especially pieces familiar from books and prints, and not just for the beauty. Sometimes there are elements not evident in the "copies".

A few years back an exhibit on genre paintings came to town (San Diego) which included Wm. Sydney Mount's "Banjo Player in the Barn" (1855, Detroit Institute of the Arts.)

While this was a familiar image, I had never noted that the musician was , though seated, using a strap! This is one of the best and most realistic depictions of the "early" use of a banjo strap I have seen, and was hiding in plain site in a familiar image. Knowing it is there, I can now see it in the prints, but it was a revelation(to me) when I saw the original. The strap, by the way, is a red cord, which seems to be attached to the brackets. A practice I have adopted, based on that document.

Aug 17, 2020 - 7:01:22 PM

10644 posts since 1/15/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Jarvie

We got a chance to see the larger canvas, just by chance, on a road trip in 2016, at the Denver Art Museum hosted show "Dance: American Art, 1830-1960". While not banjo-centric, this exhibit was accompanied by a very nice catalog as well. There is a dedicated section on "The Black Presence in the Art of American Dance".

It is always a treat to see original art, especially pieces familiar from books and prints, and not just for the beauty. Sometimes there are elements not evident in the "copies".

A few years back an exhibit on genre paintings came to town (San Diego) which included Wm. Sydney Mount's "Banjo Player in the Barn" (1855, Detroit Institute of the Arts.)

While this was a familiar image, I had never noted that the musician was , though seated, using a strap! This is one of the best and most realistic depictions of the "early" use of a banjo strap I have seen, and was hiding in plain site in a familiar image. Knowing it is there, I can now see it in the prints, but it was a revelation(to me) when I saw the original. The strap, by the way, is a red cord, which seems to be attached to the brackets. A practice I have adopted, based on that document.


Interesting observations!  I totally agree that it is indeed always a treat to see original paintings, especially after having seen prints of it.  I went to a Van Gogh exhibit early this year and it was great seeing original work.  The auction house where the OP painting is only 60 miles from me, so it might be worthwhile to go to the previews, if they are letting people in to inspect auction items in person.  I suspect they are although the auction day will have no bidders present.

Aug 18, 2020 - 1:32:17 PM

189 posts since 4/17/2015

It was a treat and also a total surprise to see that painting! This was the equivalent of a "blockbuster" show on the topic, at the Denver Art Museum, with many "iconic" and familiar works of art! And we just happened to be there.

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