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I'm thinkin' Tru-Oil for neck and Deft clear gloss lacquer for reso and peg

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Aug 14, 2020 - 10:51:08 AM
896 posts since 2/21/2011

After staining all wood parts and sealer on Mahogany reso only, (not on Maple neck), I'm thinkin' Deft Clear Gloss lacquer for reso and peghead and Tru-Oil on body of neck?

How does this sound?

Aug 14, 2020 - 11:31:12 AM

beegee

USA

21837 posts since 7/6/2005
Online Now

What's the advantage of Tru-Oil on maple? I used Deft on my 1st banjo's maple neck back in 1972. Good stuff. Buffs out well. I used ZAR bowling alley finish on my resonator because I wanted to protect against buckle-rash. Wish I would have used Deft on there as well.

Aug 14, 2020 - 12:06:53 PM

896 posts since 2/21/2011

I was thinking the Tru-Oil might make for less hand friction on the back of the neck.

Aug 14, 2020 - 12:16:04 PM

2126 posts since 2/7/2008

I think those are fine choices.

On my last banjo I used Osmo PolyX on the neck. Easy to apply and very slick. Appearance-wise, it doesn’t pop the grain as much as I’d like, but I guess there are trade-offs.

Aug 14, 2020 - 1:39:50 PM
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beegee

USA

21837 posts since 7/6/2005
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by 1xsculler

I was thinking the Tru-Oil might make for less hand friction on the back of the neck.


1. Unfinished maple would be slickest of all
2. I don't get the "friction" thing. I have been playing for over 55 years in all kinds of weather, in all sorts of settings and friction has never been an issue. The only part of my hand that usually contacts the neck is pad of my thumb. Maybe I'm doing something wrong?

Aug 14, 2020 - 1:43:38 PM
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7780 posts since 1/7/2005

quote:
Originally posted by beegee
quote:
Originally posted by 1xsculler

I was thinking the Tru-Oil might make for less hand friction on the back of the neck.


1. Unfinished maple would be slickest of all
2. I don't get the "friction" thing. I have been playing for over 55 years in all kinds of weather, in all sorts of settings and friction has never been an issue. The only part of my hand that usually contacts the neck is pad of my thumb. Maybe I'm doing something wrong?


Sounds like you're doing everything right.  :->

Aug 14, 2020 - 4:05:46 PM
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11086 posts since 6/2/2008

quote:
Originally posted by beegee
2. I don't get the "friction" thing. I have been playing for over 55 years in all kinds of weather, in all sorts of settings and friction has never been an issue. The only part of my hand that usually contacts the neck is pad of my thumb. Maybe I'm doing something wrong?

There was something wrong with the original lacquer finish on my 1973 custom build. Within a year, little black bits would roll off when I played outside or in long sessions. I polished it a lot with Gibson or Martin polish to keep it smooth feeling. Finally, in 2001, as part of some other work, I had it resprayed at First Quality. It's been great for 19 years. Smooth. No drag or friction. No wear.

Of my other three banjos, the slickest feeling one has a lacquered neck. Refinished in the last year by John Boulding. My DIY TruOil and water-based poly necks don't drag a lot, but they're not as smooth as either of my lacquer necks.

Of course, I'm the one who did them, so there's that.

Aug 14, 2020 - 4:59:31 PM
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beegee

USA

21837 posts since 7/6/2005
Online Now

I always use lacquer and my necks are as slick as deer-guts on a doorknob.

Aug 14, 2020 - 6:05:32 PM
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4520 posts since 11/20/2004

I agree with tru oil on neck and lacquer for peg head and reso. That is the way I do mine. I have used the Deft and it was OK, but on my last ones, I used Mohawk from a woodworkers supply and believe it to be a little more clear.
Some have no stickiness with lacquer on necks, but with both my own spraying and with factory necks, I find them to get tacky. I carried both Scotchbrite pads and baby powder in my case for years until I started using Tru oil. We all have different chemistry in our skin, it seems.

Aug 14, 2020 - 6:34:37 PM

MrMoe

USA

42 posts since 5/18/2019

Deft handles so nicely and smells so bad. It starts off smelling OK like coconut flavored lacquer, but then lingers for a long long time smelling like cat pee. I am trying good old Nitrocellulose again. I am also fond of no finish at all (violin style) on the contact portions of the neck. I have really struggled with finishes for years. I have gotten good and durable results with Min-wax polyurethane but it is frowned upon by most builders. I have also tried all of the shellacs. They are not durable. Watco butcher bock oil seems to have some promise. I have used it some, nice gloss without much work, but have no data on the durability. I continue to hope for an easy, durable, affordable finish.

Edited by - MrMoe on 08/14/2020 18:48:03

Aug 14, 2020 - 7:33:57 PM

2126 posts since 2/7/2008

quote:
Originally posted by MrMoe

 I have also tried all of the shellacs. 


Have you tried Royal Lac? "Royal-Lac looks and feels like shellac but has the durability of synthetic finishes like polyurethane, lacquer, urethane, etc. Super Blond goes on clear."

Supposedly behaves like shellac, but is more durable. I haven't tried it, but I want to. I just need to make room on their of half full cans of finishes I've tried. 

Aug 15, 2020 - 2:33:26 AM

MrMoe

USA

42 posts since 5/18/2019

Quickstep192
I have not. It sounds too good to be true. I remember reading a little about it a few years ago. Below is a link to an article describing its use and test results that is on ShelacFinishes.com. Thanks for the recommendation. I hope I can try it sometime. My spraying outfit may be too dated. Thanks, Maurice

shellacfinishes.com/wp-content...alLac.pdf

Aug 15, 2020 - 7:40:28 PM

Fathand

Canada

11642 posts since 2/7/2008

I find Nitro to be sticky on a neck when your hand warms it up for quite a while, months, a year?. Is it because I use Watco aerosol? Can't find Deft aerosol nitro lacquer in Canada for years, only can find the polyurethane and the brush on nitro.

I am in the process of building 4 electric guitars and one mandolin. I used Tru-oil on the backs of all the necks. The 4 maple necks took about 3 coats of Tru Oil and the African Mahogany Neck took 6 coats which also filled the grain to my satisfaction. They are slick as can be with no waiting months to cure and no toxic fumes. No Spray equipment, just wipe on a few coats with a paper towel, steel wool and do another coat.

I have been using aerosol shellac on the peghead to embed the vinyl decal log. 3 Coats. wet sand, another 3 coats, wet sand and buff and it looks just like nitro laquer.

I did the electric mando curly maple body with tru oil as well but it took more coats than the neck (12?), maybe because of larger flat surface or maybe a learning curve. It did come out deep and glossy after wet sanding with # 1000 then a hand buffing with Meguiars #9 Swirl remover.

At some point I am going to try EM6000. I have a can and a compressor/gun but I have to learn to use them. I have only used a gun to spray stain on a garden bench so far.

I have not so great lungs. Due to the toxicity/smell, I will only use lacquer in the future to repair other lacquered instruments.

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