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Aug 11, 2020 - 10:18:27 AM
50 posts since 1/10/2018

Hello all I have a question for you. I just put a new neck on Old k banjo pot and was wondering how can I figure out if I got everything right. I don’t know how to play yet and was going to use it to learn how to play when I play with just the right hand it sounds good but when I cord it it just don’t seam right. I did have to modify the neck Some to fit the pot I ended up adding a piece of the broken neck, because when I originally got the neck I was going to cut it to match the profile of the old neck At the heal. when my family member went to cut it he accidentally cut it straight The only thing I did was add about the same amount of neck that was removed What do I have to do reposition the frets or something else like just re fret it .here is a som of the pics of me modifying the neck Any help would be appreciated




 

Aug 11, 2020 - 10:19:41 AM

50 posts since 1/10/2018

quote:
Originally posted by arlo69cal

Hello all I have a question for you. I just put a new neck on Old k banjo pot and was wondering how can I figure out if I got everything right. I don’t know how to play yet and was going to use it to learn how to play when I play with just the right hand it sounds good but when I cord it it just don’t seam right. I did have to modify the neck Some to fit the pot I ended up adding a piece of the broken neck, because when I originally got the neck I was going to cut it to match the profile of the old neck At the heal. when my family member went to cut it he accidentally cut it straight The only thing I did was add about the same amount of neck that was removed What do I have to do reposition the frets or something else like just re fret it .here is a som of the pics of me modifying the neck Any help would be appreciated some of the  bild pic ie added to help ty


Aug 11, 2020 - 10:25:59 AM

50 posts since 1/10/2018

quote:
Originally posted by arlo69cal
quote:
Originally posted by arlo69cal

Hello all I have a question for you. I just put a new neck on Old k banjo pot and was wondering how can I figure out if I got everything right. I don’t know how to play yet and was going to use it to learn how to play when I play with just the right hand it sounds good but when I cord it it just don’t seam right. I did have to modify the neck Some to fit the pot I ended up adding a piece of the broken neck, because when I originally got the neck I was going to cut it to match the profile of the old neck At the heal. when my family member went to cut it he accidentally cut it straight The only thing I did was add about the same amount of neck that was removed What do I have to do reposition the frets or something else like just re fret it .here is a som of the pics of me modifying the neck Any help would be appreciated some of the  bild pic ie added to help ty


 







Aug 11, 2020 - 10:41:42 AM
likes this

13271 posts since 10/30/2008

Cutting the proper neck heel angle may be the most finicky part of building a banjo. Hard to give guidance with photos and DIMENSIONS of your pot, dowel stick, etc.

Perhaps someone can advise.

Aug 11, 2020 - 10:42:02 AM
like this

2928 posts since 2/18/2009

Adding or removing wood at the neck heel shouldn't prevent it from playing in tune, it just alters where the bridge has to go on the head. The easiest way to find the bridge location is to measure from the nut to the 12th fret, and then measure that far again from the 12th fret toward the tailpiece. The bridge will end up a little further toward the tailpiece than this. To fine tune the bridge location I tune the two D strings (assuming this is a 5 string banjo) and then fret these strings at the 12th fret. If the fretted notes are sharp the bridge needs to move a bit toward the tailpiece, if they're flat the bridge needs to move a little toward the neck. Best of luck with your project.

Aug 11, 2020 - 10:48:45 AM

50 posts since 1/10/2018

Thinks fo the info so fare but t do have the bridge set at the proper position from the 12th fret I did also replace the bridge tell please and tuners but I don’t think the tailpiece will make a difference nor the tuners

Aug 11, 2020 - 10:59:28 AM

2928 posts since 2/18/2009

If the fretted notes sound sharp it is possible that the nut is too tall or the action is too high, so the strings are getting pulled too far to reach the frets. Beyond that I am not sure what to suggest.

Aug 11, 2020 - 11:13:53 AM

50 posts since 1/10/2018

I’m not sure but I think it more a doll Or flat
sound

Aug 11, 2020 - 11:17:40 AM

50 posts since 1/10/2018

Oh these are the original frets on it Except last fret

Aug 11, 2020 - 11:22:02 AM

11094 posts since 6/2/2008

Seems you should be able to cut an angle into the heel. And you still have to carve a radius into the face of the heel that meets the rim. If you don't want to cut off any more length to bring back the neck angle, you can shim the neck at the top -- but that will reduce contact surface unless you use a correctly tapered shim that covers the whole face of the heel.

If you lost the 22nd fret in the miscut, that's the only one you need to replace. You can figure out its location by using the free free position calculator at Stew-Mac. To use it, you need to know your "scale length," which will be twice the distance from the face of the nut to the top of the 12th fret. Enter that as a decimal. Enter 22 as the number of frets (if that's in fact what you have) and select banjo from the drop-down menu.  The row for 22nd fret will tell you both its distance from the nut and its distance from the 21st fret. Check the accuracy of results by confirming that the distance for 12th fret is what you measured. If they don't match, remeasure your distance to the 12th fret and recalculate your decimal equivalent.

Good luck.

Aug 11, 2020 - 2:16:24 PM

7627 posts since 8/28/2013

The first picture in the second set shows that the heel cut is not correct and that the neck will be skewed toward the 5th side and the strings will be at the edge of the fretboard on that side. That's the main problem I can actually see, although it's probable that the neck angle front to back is also incorrect, leaving you with an action that's either too high or too low, which, as Zachary Hoyt mentions, can affect the tuning.

Because the frets were already installed when you got this neck, they are most likely correctly placed, and the bridge will merely need to be moved closer to the tailpiece if you shorten the neck further.

The neck/pot junction is about the most difficult job in banjo buildiing, and while I admire you for trying, I suggest that because you can't yet play, that you obtain a banjo that's already built properly, and learn to make your own when you have some playing experience to go by, and know thenmore of what might be happening and what adjustments to make.

Aug 12, 2020 - 7:44:03 PM

50 posts since 1/10/2018

Ok just so every bo know the first pic in second row or top right corner is the neck be for I cut it whin it eas but Rongelap I put part of the original neck that base the right angel on the neck so the neck on the banjo is at the right angle

Aug 12, 2020 - 7:58:30 PM

50 posts since 1/10/2018

Ok this pic is of the old broken neck that I got a pice off of the to fixe the other neck so it wold have the right fitness to the pot cause a family member cut it wrong so we cut the end straight at the heal then added the amount removed back on to the new heal from the old heal


 

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