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Aug 3, 2020 - 12:25:37 PM
43 posts since 5/22/2020

Howdy, I’m a percussionist and Just a few months ago I took up tenor banjo. I’m at The point where I know a good amount of chords and different forms, but I haven’t got a clue about anything else. Keys, octaves, progressions, scales are all foreign to me. I would like to get a good enough ear to be able to listen to songs and play along, tho it is not as easy as I have thought. What is the best way to learn my banjo?

Aug 3, 2020 - 1:06:44 PM

2225 posts since 1/16/2010

Sit down later today with your banjo and pull up some Eddie Peabody videos on YouTube. Listen and watch what he is doing...get an idea of how to strum and pick from his examples. Basic chords can be made into simple songs, and from there you can only go up! You’ve got to “want it” to succeed. Playing won’t come over night...it may take years to accomplish...depending on how well you devote yourself and your inner desire to learn. I play banjo and know very few chords or scales...yet I am an accomplished picker. Guess I've just got the ear....

Good luck and have fun!

Dow

Edited by - Texican65 on 08/03/2020 13:09:14

Aug 3, 2020 - 1:12:34 PM

BelfastFiveString

Northern Ireland

196 posts since 7/22/2020

quote:
Originally posted by Kajetan

Howdy, I’m a percussionist and Just a few months ago I took up tenor banjo. I’m at The point where I know a good amount of chords and different forms, but I haven’t got a clue about anything else. Keys, octaves, progressions, scales are all foreign to me. I would like to get a good enough ear to be able to listen to songs and play along, tho it is not as easy as I have thought. What is the best way to learn my banjo?



I'm a percussionist, too, and after 2 or 3 years of banjo playing I feel confident with my five string. Just like with the drumming, keep practising and keep at it in your own way. You know that worked before, so just make sure you give yourself the right time (both in terms of regular practice and in terms of expectation for time to be passed to learn). 

I don't know much about tenors but I do know a lot about hearing them near constantly in Irish sessions here in Belfast. Like you, I count to myself as I hear a musician playing. From what I can see, tenor players are hitting every beat with a note. So my advice would be, treat the tenor as an instrument of rhythm and count as you play. That might make things easier and more familiar for you. 

Aug 3, 2020 - 1:30:48 PM

2737 posts since 4/19/2008

quote:Originally posted by Kajetan

.......I would like to get a good enough ear to be able to listen to songs and play along, tho it is not as easy as I have thought. What is the best way to learn my banjo?


You've decided to play an instrument where the ear is your prominent mode of "input".

So I recommend my page on EAR-TRAINING here. Feel free to ask lots of questions.

Edited by - mmuussiiccaall on 08/03/2020 13:32:11

Aug 3, 2020 - 2:32:58 PM

43 posts since 5/22/2020

quote:
Originally posted by Texican65

Sit down later today with your banjo and pull up some Eddie Peabody videos on YouTube. Listen and watch what he is doing...get an idea of how to strum and pick from his examples. Basic chords can be made into simple songs, and from there you can only go up! You’ve got to “want it” to succeed. Playing won’t come over night...it may take years to accomplish...depending on how well you devote yourself and your inner desire to learn. I play banjo and know very few chords or scales...yet I am an accomplished picker. Guess I've just got the ear....

Good luck and have fun!

Dow


I like the sound of that, very inspiring. Thank you, I'm a simple man and I like the way you talk about learning: simple almost.

Aug 3, 2020 - 2:33:55 PM

43 posts since 5/22/2020

quote:
Originally posted by mmuussiiccaall

quote:Originally posted by Kajetan

.......I would like to get a good enough ear to be able to listen to songs and play along, tho it is not as easy as I have thought. What is the best way to learn my banjo?


You've decided to play an instrument where the ear is your prominent mode of "input".

So I recommend my page on EAR-TRAINING here. Feel free to ask lots of questions.


Thank you?? I never was a man who liked to read music

Aug 3, 2020 - 2:35:35 PM

43 posts since 5/22/2020

quote:
Originally posted by AlexBennett
quote:
Originally posted by Kajetan

Howdy, I’m a percussionist and Just a few months ago I took up tenor banjo. I’m at The point where I know a good amount of chords and different forms, but I haven’t got a clue about anything else. Keys, octaves, progressions, scales are all foreign to me. I would like to get a good enough ear to be able to listen to songs and play along, tho it is not as easy as I have thought. What is the best way to learn my banjo?



I'm a percussionist, too, and after 2 or 3 years of banjo playing I feel confident with my five string. Just like with the drumming, keep practising and keep at it in your own way. You know that worked before, so just make sure you give yourself the right time (both in terms of regular practice and in terms of expectation for time to be passed to learn). 

I don't know much about tenors but I do know a lot about hearing them near constantly in Irish sessions here in Belfast. Like you, I count to myself as I hear a musician playing. From what I can see, tenor players are hitting every beat with a note. So my advice would be, treat the tenor as an instrument of rhythm and count as you play. That might make things easier and more familiar for you. 


Thank you for the advice! I think counting and rythym should definitely help, though I've always been one to forget to count, especially as a drummer!

Aug 3, 2020 - 2:42:04 PM

n1wr

USA

791 posts since 12/27/2010

One thing missing in the comments. You need some training in music theory - Helps you understand the 'why.'
There are plenty of books on Music Theory - just google it.

Aug 3, 2020 - 3:04 PM

Bill Rogers (Moderator)

USA

24236 posts since 6/25/2005

I’d email Tom Collins (fretless fury). He was a professional drummer and now spends most of his time playing banjo and sheperding his ecellent “Banjo Quest” lesson project. I think he’d be the perfect source.

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