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Jul 13, 2020 - 6:18:12 AM
3139 posts since 9/12/2016

when it came out I could not work it -but got a book and learned the moves to solve it. ====Have since forgotten how --- I keep one around to remind me that there are some folks ---that have a slight superiority in a place or 2----
-A friend was bragging of a third party with a photographic memory---my work around was --yes --but she has no idea -what to do with the pictures

The shock value of the hit and run smart alecks seems to have degraded--just can't depend on anyone

food for little thought

Edited by - Tractor1 on 07/13/2020 06:34:23

Jul 13, 2020 - 6:48:54 AM
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Owen

Canada

5843 posts since 6/5/2011

Okay, Tom, here's a small thought (?) .... What about us part-time smart-alecks that so far have seen fit to hit and stick around?    Have our submissions tanked too [... either quantity or quality]?  cheeky     

Fwiw, I never came close to solving the cube... but I do sort-of-okay with wire puzzles.

Edited by - Owen on 07/13/2020 06:52:52

Jul 13, 2020 - 6:56:45 AM
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3139 posts since 9/12/2016

It is under the microscope as we speak

Jul 13, 2020 - 7:15:41 AM
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Vanjo

Canada

80 posts since 11/18/2017

Rubik's cubes are only impressive to those who haven't researched how to solve them, once the mystery is removed, they can be solved with just a bit of effort put into learning the method. They are an exercise in pattern recognition and responding with the correct algorithm. You can solve a cube with as few as a handful of algorithms. The people who can solve them in sub 10 seconds have many algorithms memorised. At my best, I had enough algorithms memorised to get through a cube in about 20 seconds, now I can probably only remember 5 or so and I reckon I could get a cube solved in 2 minutes with that. They algorithms that I can "remember" are just burned into muscle memory much like the banjo tunes I know. You could think of an algorithm as 2-bar pattern, or a roll if you are a bluegrass player.

Jul 13, 2020 - 7:24:52 AM

3139 posts since 9/12/2016

Oh I have a book that could turn me into a cubist--but without the book  and going cold turkey , no hints ,------I don't think i could have ever figured that out.--- I am stubborn to a fault-- I don't give up quickly.

I don't find it impressive either -- unless those of such gifts remain humble to me and my ''baggage of mediocrity''crying

Edited by - Tractor1 on 07/13/2020 07:29:20

Jul 13, 2020 - 7:31:21 AM
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Owen

Canada

5843 posts since 6/5/2011

Vanjo, doesn't looking up the solution negate the value?   ....kinda like solving a math question by getting the answer from the back of the text? 

To extend the banjo roll analogy, I can do a passable (?) job on a few rolls, but I can't hear them in music being played, nor figure out when/where/how I should use them in something I'm fumbling thru.  Is it any wonder that I've never even come close to solving the RC... and am a perpetual pre-beginner on the banjo?

Edited by - Owen on 07/13/2020 07:39:33

Jul 13, 2020 - 7:48:34 AM
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3521 posts since 12/6/2009

Back when it came out it drove everyone bananas. I spent 2 full days with hardly a break to eat. I didn’t know anything about no instructions for I had had one that someone lent me. Boy was I p***ed when kids were showing up and bing bang boom they were solving it before my very eyes. I began to think I had a serious mental deficiency. Then it dawned on me….one of those guys who tried to show me how smart he was , was a guy I knew had to think about which sock was for his left foot and which was for his right foot….that’s when I found out about the cheat sheet….. I threw the thing into the Passaic river…..

Jul 13, 2020 - 7:58:08 AM
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3139 posts since 9/12/2016

One exception on the bragging--there was a guy with those ''rainman '' type math skills on TV but still fairly normal in conversation. A man was checking his gift as he answered split second proofs of his over the top math skills--he gives the answer then says ,if it comes up different ,you better get you calculator fixed--- I also put Jerry Lee Lewis and Jimmy Martin on this list

Jul 13, 2020 - 8:20:24 AM
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Brian T

Canada

16744 posts since 6/5/2008
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In the city, I was a member of a large Rod & Gun Club for some 30 years.
The club was active enough that several of the target ranges and trap fields
were kept plowed out and minimal snow all winter long.

Of course during that span, Rubik's Cube came out.
Come spring that year and the snow melted, there must have been 200 RC's
exposed on the 50m handgun range. Brightly colored plastic shards all over the place.

Jul 13, 2020 - 8:30:55 AM
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3139 posts since 9/12/2016

post of the day Brian --my first one ended up in the garbage can ,,,''coffee grounded''

Jul 13, 2020 - 10:44:38 AM
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Vanjo

Canada

80 posts since 11/18/2017

quote:
Originally posted by Owen

Vanjo, doesn't looking up the solution negate the value?   ....kinda like solving a math question by getting the answer from the back of the text? 

To extend the banjo roll analogy, I can do a passable (?) job on a few rolls, but I can't hear them in music being played, nor figure out when/where/how I should use them in something I'm fumbling thru.  Is it any wonder that I've never even come close to solving the RC... and am a perpetual pre-beginner on the banjo?


Hi Owen, solving a cube without any understanding of what your doing would be very difficult indeed, if that is the challenge one is looking for, then by all means, the best to them. Those who know that there is a method -not at all like a cheat in my mind- the challenge becomes building the vocabulary of algorithms (in this case, patterns of movement). They more vast your vocabulary, in this regard, the more direct you can become in your movement from chaos to order. 

In the world of cubing, the real talents are the people who can solve them in less than 10 seconds, or at one glance followed by doing it blind folded. 

You guys are right, most people use them as a way of one-up-manship... but again, once you learn, and yes, just about anyone can learn to solve one, the less impressive of a feat it is. 

Jul 13, 2020 - 11:00:21 AM
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3963 posts since 11/29/2005

Easiest way I found to fix a Rubik's Cube was to pry the smaller squares off and rearrange them.

Jul 13, 2020 - 11:10:39 AM

3139 posts since 9/12/2016

sounds like you might be a tad smarter than I vanjo------ already ,I do see that getting into the speed thing ,could prove a man's worth----
Now the scientific type question
 Let's say------I mess it up  and take pictures of it ---then get my book out and fix it back to solved---could you run it --back to match my pictures ---or would you rather take it out to the skeet shoot? thank's for dropping by  btw

Edited by - Tractor1 on 07/13/2020 11:11:53

Jul 13, 2020 - 11:27:51 AM
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Owen

Canada

5843 posts since 6/5/2011

quote:
Originally posted by Vanjo.
<snip> Those who know that there is a method -not at all like a cheat in my mind- the challenge becomes building the vocabulary of algorithms (in this case, patterns of movement). They more vast your vocabulary, in this regard, the more direct you can become in your movement from chaos to order.  <snip>

I understand what you're saying, Vanjo, but to my mind shouldn't the challenge come from figuring out the patterns of movement, rather than reading what somebody else has figured out?

Come to think of it, maybe if I approached playing the banjo as a puzzle to be solved I'd progress a bit faster.... .   

Jul 13, 2020 - 11:35:39 AM

3139 posts since 9/12/2016

melodic (keith) style scales wow they are first cousins

Jul 13, 2020 - 6:03:11 PM
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3156 posts since 7/28/2015
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I usually solve my 6x6x6 while I'm on a business meeting call and can't do something like play the banjo, to give my hands to do. The 6x6x6 part at least means that I didn't solve all of it from memorizing from a book. I have a Sudoku one I haven't managed to solve yet.

Edited by - prooftheory on 07/13/2020 18:04:59

Jul 13, 2020 - 10:32:27 PM

182 posts since 8/11/2015

I was given the cube formulas from an older neighbor kid and nobody else at my age group knew anything like them existed. I think they were called Singmaster’s Notes or something like that. I felt good. I solved the cube in under a minute. A lot less if I got lucky and the pieces were in favorable positions so that you didn’t need to go through all of the formulas.

In reality I lack even basic math skills and can still only barely add and subtract. I don’t know the names of a single banjo chord. My brain simply doesn’t seem to want to retain that information. But I can learn a tune fairly quickly by ear and I may have a couple of other qualities. Mainly with images. Color and composition.

A cube showed up a few years ago at a party and two of my friends who never had one as a kid and never knew any formulas both solved it immediately by reason alone. I had forgotten my formulas after so many decades and was helpless.

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