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my maters ain't makin maters

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Jul 12, 2020 - 4:31:19 PM
5034 posts since 9/5/2006

i got good strong plants ,, good rich soil,, blooms ,, watered regularly ,, but no maters yet,,not even a little one. i got them set in the morning sun approx. 4 to 6 hours the evening sun is just too hot on them.

Jul 12, 2020 - 6:44:04 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

13948 posts since 9/27/2007

It's the opposite here Terry. We've had a cold & rainy season so far up here. The plants are nice & green but not too many blossoms.

Like always we're hoping for a long & dry fall. LOL! We have 10 different plants so we'll see how it works out.

Jul 12, 2020 - 6:48 PM

3137 posts since 9/12/2016

ate our first red one yesterday.They are coming on great ,if the blossom end rot does not get real bad

Jul 12, 2020 - 7:11:40 PM

Owen

Canada

5805 posts since 6/5/2011

I do [some of] the work that doesn't require too much thinking and leave the thinking stuff up to my wife.... it's worked well so far. [Eg. of MY contribution: this spring it got 1" of coarse sand and 1.5" of rotted manure prior to roto-tilling.]

First month was cool, dry and windy.... this past month warm/hot and lots of rain..... everything "looks" good to this point... [green] tomatoes included.  All we've had so far is lettuce [gave some away and still can't keep up] and just yesterday a feed of beet greens and small beets, from thinning. 

My wife just checked her book and apparently it says blossom end rot is caused/exacerbated by insufficient watering.   ....and she hasn't given me a bum steer yet.

Jul 12, 2020 - 7:49:16 PM

3137 posts since 9/12/2016

I think my boss said the same--we are getting some unusual for us downbursts 1inch or more in 20 or so minutes. but no excess wet or dry either on a season basis --

Jul 12, 2020 - 8:19:51 PM
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RonR

USA

1660 posts since 11/29/2012

I have lots of green tomatoes, but just one red cherry so far. They usually start to ripen around July 20th. Cucumbers and squash come in about the same time. I don't get full sun all day. I have to water most days.

Jul 13, 2020 - 6:50:35 AM
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rinemb

USA

12401 posts since 5/24/2005

My plants are looking pretty good considering the heat stress. Big and bushy. Most blossoms not producing tomatoes. The first few have also suffered bottom rot. So early this morning I got up to water, and while it is still cool, I sprayed all the plants with a diluted calcium supplement, hopefully to get more calcium into the maters-which "they" say helps with the bottom rot.
As to watering, I am at a loss. Its been dry and hot. We have to hand water. Though I am trying to force the roots deeper.
Usually, by July 4th, we have plants full of tomatoes. But, I will take healthy plants for now.

Brad

Jul 13, 2020 - 6:57:41 AM
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rinemb

USA

12401 posts since 5/24/2005

About the plants...and a pet peeve. Miss-marked plants from the nursery. Argghhh!
One plant we always buy, is a "Juliet", not a grape, not a cherry. Well, the tag said juliet, but it turns out to be a miniature cherry tomato. Marble size, fruits. Almost not worth effort, unless it becomes more fruit prolific.
Brad

Edited by - rinemb on 07/13/2020 06:58:25

Jul 13, 2020 - 7:21:41 AM

Owen

Canada

5805 posts since 6/5/2011

Mis-marked isn't the only pitfall, Brad.   After we [I] planted a Diablo Nine Bark this spring, we [she] noticed on the label that it's recommended for a hardiness zone milder than ours.... we [she] usually try to err the other way.  Fortunately that falls into the "thinking" department.... and she says: "Maybe it will be okay."    But we [yes we] have been known to once in a while write a note on the calendar ...and then forget (?) to check the calendar.

Jul 13, 2020 - 8:19:03 AM
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rinemb

USA

12401 posts since 5/24/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Owen

Mis-marked isn't the only pitfall, Brad.   After we [I] planted a Diablo Nine Bark this spring, we [she] noticed on the label that it's recommended for a hardiness zone milder than ours.... we [she] usually try to err the other way.  Fortunately that falls into the "thinking" department.... and she says: "Maybe it will be okay."    But we [yes we] have been known to once in a while write a note on the calendar ...and then forget (?) to check the calendar.


I would think any plant seller would only sell plants suitable for your zone.  We folks can't be held responsible for knowing which plants do better here or there.  I guess, that "buyer beware" thing is part of the gardening world, eh.  Brad

Jul 13, 2020 - 2:33:54 PM

5034 posts since 9/5/2006

well these are big boys,,, not so big right now

Jul 13, 2020 - 8:10:07 PM

3137 posts since 9/12/2016

The better half lays her rows out closer than I do. She did most of this--chard at first I think --then potatoes corn tomatoes -etc.

Jul 14, 2020 - 6:33:01 AM
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rinemb

USA

12401 posts since 5/24/2005

I would like to plant my tomatoes about 4-5 ft apart, but due to limited space I have them 2-3 ft apart. Makes it a bit tougher to get around them, and that may not let them breath enough? I do prune the branches and new starters off from pot level to at least 6 inches up. Sometimes I top them out if too leggy.
Brad

Jul 14, 2020 - 6:38:42 AM
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3137 posts since 9/12/2016

I just do the grunt work-(fence-till-weed etc.) and sneak in a thought or 2

Jul 14, 2020 - 8:01:57 AM

1940 posts since 2/10/2013

I live on the Gulf Coast. I would pay $10 or more for a ripe Michigan Grown "Beefsteak" tomato. Gardeners carried bags full to work and gave them away. If someone was handing them out "down here", the line would be long and the "Beefsteak" tomatoes would quickly disappear.

I keep telling my daughter in Ohio to bring some "down" when she comes to visit. But, she always forgets. To "get even" I tell her what I pay in property taxes. And my property tax is a small fraction of what she has to pay.

Jul 14, 2020 - 12:29:51 PM

DRH

USA

495 posts since 5/29/2018

Our Roma tomatoes are producing faster than we can give them away, but they are not much bigger than cherry tomatoes. The beefsteaks are also about half size. The better boys could be doing better.

I think poor soil and high temperatures make it hard to grow tomatoes here. Okra normally does well, though for some reason none of them made it this year. Green and wax beans were doing great until this week. Heat got to them.

Jul 14, 2020 - 1:13:26 PM

5034 posts since 9/5/2006

quote:
Originally posted by DRH

Our Roma tomatoes are producing faster than we can give them away, but they are not much bigger than cherry tomatoes. The beefsteaks are also about half size. The better boys could be doing better.

I think poor soil and high temperatures make it hard to grow tomatoes here. Okra normally does well, though for some reason none of them made it this year. Green and wax beans were doing great until this week. Heat got to them.


don't think the soil is my deal,,, although i may be impatient too,,,  i got mine in 5 gallon buckets of rich potting soil,, with drainage.  and in morning to mid day sun.  getting more blooms,, just waiting.  they are about 3 1/2 feet tall in the buckets . and maybe 10 to 12 blooms on each.

Jul 15, 2020 - 3:04:30 PM
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630 posts since 3/2/2010

I've got a couple of plants in a large container on my porch (Southern California) and early on I noticed very few of the blossoms seemed to be turning into tomatoes. I did a little research and figured out that they likely weren't getting pollinated. So, I took the matter into my own hands. Every morning when I water, I gently shake any stems that have blossoms, kind of like they were blowing in a good bit of breeze, and it's made a big difference in the yield.

Jul 16, 2020 - 6:04:25 AM
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rinemb

USA

12401 posts since 5/24/2005

Cyndy, you may be on to something. I don't know what is the primary pollinating critters in our area, but I have not seen many bees, or butterflies around. And, my mater plants are in an area fairly isolated from the wind.
Maybe I will do a little shakin...Or when I have my leaf blower out, give em some breeze from a distance.
Thanks, brad

Jul 16, 2020 - 7:20:23 AM

1940 posts since 2/10/2013

I grew up in Northern New York STATE where the growing season is very short. Soil isn't all that great either. My neighbor always applied manure in the fall, and had it "turned under". The soil in her garden was wonderful and everything was very productive. And unlike some fertilizers, improves soil quality. I still think of her fantastic rhubarb. I used to eat it whenever I had a chance.

Jul 16, 2020 - 7:54:13 AM

630 posts since 3/2/2010

Yup! I grew up in Central New York and we used dried horse manure that we got from a relative. And I think my grandfather added peat moss, too. I was also taught to pick off the suckers—the little shoots that grow in the V of the main stems. We always got a lot of tomatoes from the plants.

Jul 16, 2020 - 10:42:25 AM
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rinemb

USA

12401 posts since 5/24/2005

I have heard of folks using a fine artists brush, and randomly passing the brush from blossom to blossom. I never tried that, though. Brad

Jul 16, 2020 - 12:00:09 PM
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rinemb

USA

12401 posts since 5/24/2005

Pollinate tomato blossoms with  art brush, cutip, finger, electric toothbrush, or better a radio or your banjo.  Yes, sit at your plant and play.  The micro vibrations help greatly...he says.  go to 5 minute mark to begin methods.

 

Edited by - rinemb on 07/16/2020 12:00:36

Jul 17, 2020 - 7:54:20 AM
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rinemb

USA

12401 posts since 5/24/2005

Yesterday, I put a strong bluetooth speaker amongst my tomato plants. Blasted em 60s R&R music. Not sure if they liked it, but I did. I did not share my cold beer though .
Today I tickled a lot of blossoms with my finger.
We'll see, soon. Brad

Jul 17, 2020 - 11:57:53 AM

10337 posts since 1/15/2005

Brad .... you are right about adding calcium to the soil to prevent end rot. Some of the old timers, including me, used to save egg shells and crush them up and sprinkle them around the tomato plant. If you are a little starved for room you might want to try and Japanese tomato ring. I did it a few years ago and it came out pretty well. It basically consists of building a chicken wire (or the like) column, maybe 3' in diameter or so and filling it part way up with different layers of compost and fertilizer. You plant four tomato plants equally spaced around the perimeter and you only water the inside of the column, not directly the plants. If done right, you will get a lot of tomatoes.

Jul 17, 2020 - 12:23:39 PM

14841 posts since 12/2/2005

All of my nightshade family plants - tomatoes, tomatillos, eggplant and peppers (capsicums, if you wish) - are doing pretty well this year. As are my squash.

But my onions, carrots and lettuce are a bust. Even though my garden beds are irrigated with soaker hoses, it's been so dry this summer they just can't get a start.

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