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Jul 6, 2020 - 5:18:21 PM

Movark

USA

42 posts since 3/1/2019

Not quite sure how to describe this. I know replacing this nut will be something most luthiers can do, or even myself do it, but no idea what’s happening with this peg. Seller said it worked if you just knocked it into the hole, but it slips out at even the slightest of tension. Any advice?

Edit: Uploaded a better picture of the hole, concerned as it looks like two different depths

Edit 2: Made a shim our of some flat toothpicks, and working well! Will add glue if it doesn't hold, but this is a good enough bodge. Thanks for the help y'all!




Edited by - Movark on 07/07/2020 14:52:44

Jul 6, 2020 - 6:22:07 PM
like this

3859 posts since 10/13/2005

I've done what is shown here, wrap paper around the shaft. I use brown grocery bag paper. Paper is wood after all. And I put a layer of Elmer's glue around the paper. Practice with a dry run or two. The experts here may frown on such a fly-by-night solution but hey, if it works....banjered

Jul 6, 2020 - 6:34:55 PM

13102 posts since 10/30/2008

What's wrong with the pip?

It might help if you used one or two toothpicks jammed in on either side of that tapered part, to give it something to "fetch up on" so it won't turn or loosen. Peel away some of that tape of paper in the two spots where the toothpicks will be, so they can "catch" on those brass splines.

5th string pegs fall out all the time. Not a crisis. As Banjered said, just find something that works. DON'T hammer on anything you could break or split the neck/fingerboard area. Tunk on it gently yes, but don't hammer on it.

Good luck.

Jul 6, 2020 - 9:03:55 PM

Movark

USA

42 posts since 3/1/2019

quote:
Originally posted by banjered

I've done what is shown here, wrap paper around the shaft. I use brown grocery bag paper. Paper is wood after all. And I put a layer of Elmer's glue around the paper. Practice with a dry run or two. The experts here may frown on such a fly-by-night solution but hey, if it works....banjered


Sounds promising, how would you recommend practicing this? Got any videos of this MacGyver?

Jul 7, 2020 - 6:14:52 AM

7382 posts since 8/28/2013
Online Now

I'd remove the paper and go with several toothpicks (the flat kind), not just one or two. Glue them into the sides of the hole and then push the tuner into place.

Jul 7, 2020 - 7:01:07 AM

2242 posts since 4/7/2010

The quick fix repairs mentioned above will likely work, but in my shoppe would do a full peg bushing.

The hole would be reamed out with a tapered reamer, then a precision tapered plug fit to the tapered hole glued in. Then drilled and re-reamed to fit the tuner.

Of course sometimes it does not make economic sense to do that much work on a low grade banjo and the toothpick fixes are quite appropriate.

Bob Smakula

Jul 7, 2020 - 7:45:29 AM

Movark

USA

42 posts since 3/1/2019

quote:
Originally posted by banjered

I've done what is shown here, wrap paper around the shaft. I use brown grocery bag paper. Paper is wood after all. And I put a layer of Elmer's glue around the paper. Practice with a dry run or two. The experts here may frown on such a fly-by-night solution but hey, if it works....banjered


Elmers white or elmers wood glue?

Jul 7, 2020 - 7:51:55 AM

10789 posts since 10/27/2006

That's a friction peg and will take a bit of glue to work properly. If the hole were tight that wouldn't be necessary—but it isn't.

I like liquid hide glue but white glue will work. Apply a thin coat around the side. If you need a paper shim, that's ok—if not thick enough, flat toothpicks, then. If you ever need to remove it, a mild sideways tap will break the glue bond with LGH; white glue doesn't stick very well to metal.

Be careful not to get glue near the bottom of that peg or else it won't work. Take that paper off and examine the bottom and you'll see why.

If you were thinking about using a geared 5th peg, now's the time to do it. Among other reasons, they need a larger, tapered hole.

When setting up new banjos for children, the geared 5th always gets a drop of LHG.

Jul 7, 2020 - 7:57:13 AM

Movark

USA

42 posts since 3/1/2019

quote:
Originally posted by mikehalloran

That's a friction peg and will take a bit of glue to work properly. If the hole were tight that wouldn't be necessary—but it isn't.

I like liquid hide glue but white glue will work. Apply a thin coat around the side. If you need a paper shim, that's ok—if not thick enough, flat toothpicks, then. If you ever need to remove it, a mild sideways tap will break the glue bond with LGH; white glue doesn't stick very well to metal.

Be careful not to get glue near the bottom of that peg or else it won't work. Take that paper off and examine the bottom and you'll see why.

If you were thinking about using a geared 5th peg, now's the time to do it. Among other reasons, they need a larger, tapered hole.

When setting up new banjos for children, the geared 5th always gets a drop of LHG.


I'll keep that in mind, along w/ considering a geared 5th one. This tuner isn't original, so I don't mind putting it aside. Any recommendations for a geared tuner?

Jul 7, 2020 - 8:04:44 AM

5394 posts since 9/21/2007

quote:
Originally posted by Movark
quote:
Originally posted by mikehalloran

That's a friction peg and will take a bit of glue to work properly. If the hole were tight that wouldn't be necessary—but it isn't.

I like liquid hide glue but white glue will work. Apply a thin coat around the side. If you need a paper shim, that's ok—if not thick enough, flat toothpicks, then. If you ever need to remove it, a mild sideways tap will break the glue bond with LGH; white glue doesn't stick very well to metal.

Be careful not to get glue near the bottom of that peg or else it won't work. Take that paper off and examine the bottom and you'll see why.

If you were thinking about using a geared 5th peg, now's the time to do it. Among other reasons, they need a larger, tapered hole.

When setting up new banjos for children, the geared 5th always gets a drop of LHG.


I'll keep that in mind, along w/ considering a geared 5th one. This tuner isn't original, so I don't mind putting it aside. Any recommendations for a geared tuner?


Unless you are using wire strings I would recommend no geared tuners.

Jul 7, 2020 - 8:11:30 AM

Movark

USA

42 posts since 3/1/2019

quote:
Originally posted by Joel Hooks
quote:
Originally posted by Movark
quote:
Originally posted by mikehalloran

That's a friction peg and will take a bit of glue to work properly. If the hole were tight that wouldn't be necessary—but it isn't.

I like liquid hide glue but white glue will work. Apply a thin coat around the side. If you need a paper shim, that's ok—if not thick enough, flat toothpicks, then. If you ever need to remove it, a mild sideways tap will break the glue bond with LGH; white glue doesn't stick very well to metal.

Be careful not to get glue near the bottom of that peg or else it won't work. Take that paper off and examine the bottom and you'll see why.

If you were thinking about using a geared 5th peg, now's the time to do it. Among other reasons, they need a larger, tapered hole.

When setting up new banjos for children, the geared 5th always gets a drop of LHG.


I'll keep that in mind, along w/ considering a geared 5th one. This tuner isn't original, so I don't mind putting it aside. Any recommendations for a geared tuner?


Unless you are using wire strings I would recommend no geared tuners.


Gotcha

Jul 7, 2020 - 8:31:15 AM

10789 posts since 10/27/2006


Unless you are using wire strings I would recommend no geared tuners.


There are those of us who don't agree with that recommendation unless it's a banjo with historical significance.

I's your banjo. Do what you like.

Jul 7, 2020 - 1:24:30 PM

7382 posts since 8/28/2013
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by Bob Smakula

The quick fix repairs mentioned above will likely work, but in my shoppe would do a full peg bushing.

The hole would be reamed out with a tapered reamer, then a precision tapered plug fit to the tapered hole glued in. Then drilled and re-reamed to fit the tuner.

Of course sometimes it does not make economic sense to do that much work on a low grade banjo and the toothpick fixes are quite appropriate.

Bob Smakula


Were this an expensive instrument, I also would have recommended re-bushing. But from the photo, it appears to be a less-than-high quality banjo; thus the toothpick idea.

I find that paper can tear with the forces required to jam a tuner in and to hold it in place. A paper shim might end up doing nothing in the bottom of the hole. 

Edited by - G Edward Porgie on 07/07/2020 13:29:36

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