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May 22, 2020 - 2:28:03 PM
10 posts since 5/22/2020

I just got a free and VERY old tenor banjo from my brother's girlfriend and I'm having quite fun with it after waiting a year for it to get fixed. Nevertheless, I'm just curious to know which method of playing is best for a 4 string tenor banjo. are there any upsides to playing one way vs. the other, or are they all equally as good?

May 22, 2020 - 4:35:19 PM
Players Union Member

Alegria

Norway

240 posts since 9/27/2014

The common approach seem to be using a pick. I would go search for mandolin lessons on youtube and play along. They are tuned the same so it works pretty good!

May 22, 2020 - 5:17:44 PM

Kajetan

USA

10 posts since 5/22/2020

quote:
Originally posted by Alegria

The common approach seem to be using a pick. I would go search for mandolin lessons on youtube and play along. They are tuned the same so it works pretty good!


Fascinating! I knew they were designed for mandolin/fiddle players but I did not realize just how similar the playing style would be. I'll check it out, thank you!

May 22, 2020 - 8:49:54 PM

7268 posts since 8/28/2013

Mel Bay has a standard tenor banjo instruction book, and there are others.

What style do you wish to play? Standard tenor tuning , used in dixieland and popular standards, is actually CGDA, whereas mandolin is GDAE. Irish tenor, used for many Celtic tunes, and played somewhat differently. is tuned an octave lower than the mandolin.

May 23, 2020 - 12:16:23 AM
Players Union Member

Alegria

Norway

240 posts since 9/27/2014

That's true! I forgot to mention that my tenor was tuned like the irish do it. That's why I could use mandolin lessons.

May 23, 2020 - 2:47:01 PM

Kajetan

USA

10 posts since 5/22/2020

quote:
Originally posted by G Edward Porgie

Mel Bay has a standard tenor banjo instruction book, and there are others.

What style do you wish to play? Standard tenor tuning , used in dixieland and popular standards, is actually CGDA, whereas mandolin is GDAE. Irish tenor, used for many Celtic tunes, and played somewhat differently. is tuned an octave lower than the mandolin.


I greatly enjoy Dixieland music, as well as bluegrass and ragtime (mainly bluegrass). I also enjoy Italian music so that's one reason I'm thinking about keeping it in mandolin tuning, so I could perhaps learn it afterwards.

May 23, 2020 - 10:02:06 PM

430 posts since 5/29/2006

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