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Apr 1, 2020 - 9:52:09 PM
like this

GlennM

USA

4490 posts since 8/31/2005

I do not sell Anything at this time.. I make all my products for the Sullivan banjo co.RE: The Viking Block and Peg wood rims. I'm ordering a new CNC that is bigger and can handle making the kits. I'll post when i start making them again.
Apr 2, 2020 - 7:16:09 PM

54457 posts since 12/14/2005

What a fascinating way to repurpose wood which has already had decades of music flowing through it!

Apr 9, 2020 - 6:56:11 AM
Players Union Member

Helix

USA

12545 posts since 8/30/2006

I concur

What kind of tree?

Apr 9, 2020 - 7:11:58 AM

GlennM

USA

4490 posts since 8/31/2005

I think it was ASH. Eric Sullivan knows more. You can reach him via BHO . It was the back two post of a very old piano.

Apr 9, 2020 - 10:06:01 AM

12813 posts since 10/30/2008

Very interesting. A question I never thought of before, what's the typical reject rate of rims in process due to cracking, splitting or other problems that crop up? I imagine the reject rate might be fairly high.

I never would have thought of using ash for a banjo rim -- it's used for old fashioned canoe paddles and baseball bats because it has a lot of "spring" in it. I think also used for canoe ribs exactly because it steams and bends so nicely. I wonder what kind of tone it's going to produce compared to hard maple...

Thanks for the video.

Apr 10, 2020 - 3:59:22 AM

4812 posts since 5/14/2007

Ash should be fine for a banjo rim. I have ash-bodied electric guitars which sound fine.

Apr 10, 2020 - 5:44:17 AM

GlennM

USA

4490 posts since 8/31/2005

I've made over 50 black walnut rims, a few 100 Indiana soft maple few 100 W.V. Soft maple, 50 cherry over 50 Hard Maple wood from a building torn down in 1870 ect ect.... I love to steam bend stuff. Heck if you stand too close I might steam bend you. LOL :)

Apr 10, 2020 - 5:45:58 AM
Players Union Member

Helix

USA

12545 posts since 8/30/2006

I use Ash for rims. It’s heavier, but it turns like Oak

I think Glenn is careful enough not to have splits and rejects

Apr 10, 2020 - 5:56:13 AM

7057 posts since 8/28/2013

Piano backposts (the video incorrectly calls them "legs," which are usually poplar or a similar softer wood) have been made from many different woods. Maple is fairly common for the purpose, although I've seen oak, poplar, ash, and other woods including pine used. European pianos used beech at times. Sometimes, these posts are built up from several pieces.

In case someone wishes to try making rims from old pianos, that person should find out exactly what wood the backposts are made of, because many of them may not be suitable.

Apr 10, 2020 - 6:12:20 AM

85 posts since 2/21/2020

John Gribble

your pickups only work because the metal string moves over it. The wood has nothing to do with it. The early days electric guitar makers used woods that were cheap and easy to get. Ash was pushed aside by Fender for example because you have to fill the grain, they used mainly Alder after that.

I 'm actually writing an E-Book on Myths about musical instruments and the music industry marketing scams.

Apr 10, 2020 - 6:28:59 AM

GlennM

USA

4490 posts since 8/31/2005

quote :So what  ur saying is that you do not understand or enjoy  Mark Twain or as Bill Monroe would say " That Aint No Part Of Nuthin" RE Making tuff from piano legs or post. I'm sure Eric Sullivan know exactly what they are. I just bend stuff. If he says bend it I bend it and its damn good when I'm done.  I only work for Eric.

Originally posted by G Edward Porgie

Piano backposts (the video incorrectly calls them "legs," which are usually poplar or a similar softer wood) have been made from many different woods. Maple is fairly common for the purpose, although I've seen oak, poplar, ash, and other woods including pine used. European pianos used beech at times. Sometimes, these posts are built up from several pieces.

In case someone wishes to try making rims from old pianos, that person should find out exactly what wood the backposts are made of, because many of them may not be suitable.


Apr 10, 2020 - 9:13:24 AM

7057 posts since 8/28/2013

quote:
Originally posted by GlennM
quote :So what  ur saying is that you do not understand or enjoy  Mark Twain or as Bill Monroe would say " That Aint No Part Of Nuthin" RE Making tuff from piano legs or post. I'm sure Eric Sullivan know exactly what they are. I just bend stuff. If he says bend it I bend it and its damn good when I'm done.  I only work for Eric.

Originally posted by G Edward Porgie

Piano backposts (the video incorrectly calls them "legs," which are usually poplar or a similar softer wood) have been made from many different woods. Maple is fairly common for the purpose, although I've seen oak, poplar, ash, and other woods including pine used. European pianos used beech at times. Sometimes, these posts are built up from several pieces.

In case someone wishes to try making rims from old pianos, that person should find out exactly what wood the backposts are made of, because many of them may not be suitable.


 


Please don't put beliefs in my mouth. 

The aforesaid was not intended to deny the use of piano backposts, it was only as a warning to others who might take the trouble to move a piano to a shop and cut it up only to discover the posts are some cheap wood that's too soft or can't easily be bent.

I am sure Mr. Sullivan knows exactly what wood is being put to use, but there are others who may not. Some backposts are pained black which can make the wood more difficult to identify.

I would never even attempt to make rims from actual piano legs. They are almost always an unsuitable species of wood, and besides which, they are only about 18-19 inches long, and many are round, tapered, or deeply carved. 

I am sorry if I offended you by correcting your use of the term "leg."  I simply find that using the wrong term for something can lead to confusion. It's a bit like calling a "co-ordinator rod" a "truss rod," or a "flesh hoop" a tension hoop."

Apr 14, 2020 - 7:58:26 AM

GlennM

USA

4490 posts since 8/31/2005

quote:Why not. you do it to me.

Originally posted by G Edward Porgie
quote:
Originally posted by GlennM
quote :So what  ur saying is that you do not understand or enjoy  Mark Twain or as Bill Monroe would say " That Aint No Part Of Nuthin" RE Making tuff from piano legs or post. I'm sure Eric Sullivan know exactly what they are. I just bend stuff. If he says bend it I bend it and its damn good when I'm done.  I only work for Eric.

Originally posted by G Edward Porgie

Piano backposts (the video incorrectly calls them "legs," which are usually poplar or a similar softer wood) have been made from many different woods. Maple is fairly common for the purpose, although I've seen oak, poplar, ash, and other woods including pine used. European pianos used beech at times. Sometimes, these posts are built up from several pieces.

In case someone wishes to try making rims from old pianos, that person should find out exactly what wood the backposts are made of, because many of them may not be suitable.


 


Please don't put beliefs in my mouth. 

The aforesaid was not intended to deny the use of piano backposts, it was only as a warning to others who might take the trouble to move a piano to a shop and cut it up only to discover the posts are some cheap wood that's too soft or can't easily be bent.

I am sure Mr. Sullivan knows exactly what wood is being put to use, but there are others who may not. Some backposts are pained black which can make the wood more difficult to identify.

I would never even attempt to make rims from actual piano legs. They are almost always an unsuitable species of wood, and besides which, they are only about 18-19 inches long, and many are round, tapered, or deeply carved. 

I am sorry if I offended you by correcting your use of the term "leg."  I simply find that using the wrong term for something can lead to confusion. It's a bit like calling a "co-ordinator rod" a "truss rod," or a "flesh hoop" a tension hoop."


Apr 14, 2020 - 8:00:28 AM

GlennM

USA

4490 posts since 8/31/2005

quote: You are correct. If he would have watched video he would have seen what i do with splits or cracks, anything except perfect ends up as target practice or firewood.
Originally posted by Helix

I use Ash for rims. It’s heavier, but it turns like Oak

I think Glenn is careful enough not to have splits and rejects


Apr 14, 2020 - 8:11:28 AM

GlennM

USA

4490 posts since 8/31/2005

quote: On this batch of 4 rims. I needed 12 planks to make 4 rims. Only 1 plank cracked. So on this batch of four it would be 1 to 12 planks which should translate to 1 out of 12 rims can not be made. After bending over 400 rims, I can tell you that when I bend ,the splitting depends ( assuming the grains is oriented correctly) more on how the wood was dried. When I bend air dried the success rate is higher than when I bend Kiln dried , no matter what the type of wood. There is also a secrete I learned form my grandfather about re hydrated kiln dried wood that greatly eliminates loss, assuming you have chosen the correct grain orientation.
I do not seem to have any problems with the species of trees but rather how straight the grain is , the way its dried and the age.     For example. Figured wood is a pain in the but and has over 50% loss. Same for 300 year Old Factory floor wood.
riginally posted by The Old Timer

Very interesting. A question I never thought of before, what's the typical reject rate of rims in process due to cracking, splitting or other problems that crop up? I imagine the reject rate might be fairly high.

I never would have thought of using ash for a banjo rim -- it's used for old fashioned canoe paddles and baseball bats because it has a lot of "spring" in it. I think also used for canoe ribs exactly because it steams and bends so nicely. I wonder what kind of tone it's going to produce compared to hard maple...

Thanks for the video.


Edited by - GlennM on 04/14/2020 08:27:48

Apr 14, 2020 - 8:16:57 AM

4345 posts since 12/24/2003

Eric could make some good bridges from that piano maple.


Tim

Apr 14, 2020 - 8:22:27 AM

GlennM

USA

4490 posts since 8/31/2005

quote:    You are correct and I have seen him do it. One time he gave me a chunk of maple from a piano that was  so old and hard I couldn't even cut it. I ruined 3 blades on a 2hp band saw before i gave up. I have strict instructions when making old factory floor rims to set aside  pieces that have a certain quarter sawn grain look.                    

Originally posted by Tim Purcell

Eric could make some good bridges from that piano maple.


Tim


Edited by - GlennM on 04/14/2020 08:24:55

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