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Mar 31, 2020 - 8:01:42 PM
1196 posts since 4/13/2017

I have plans to build a double fiddle case. My plan is to build the shell from 1/4" plywood with solid blocks for the corners to support it better. I then plan to wrap it in white tolex. However, how can I put a rubber seal on this similar to those found on fiberglass cases to make the opening waterproof? The tolex is waterproof, so I want the gap between the case and the lid to be waterproof too.

Apr 1, 2020 - 8:50:20 AM

54508 posts since 12/14/2005

Might window screen gasket do the job?

How about the stuff they sell for putting camper caps on pickup trucks?

 

OR- - -

run a bead of silicone caulk along the edge ot the  top part, lay waxed paper over that, set a flat board on to get it flat and even, let it set, peel off the paper,  and assemble the case.

Apr 1, 2020 - 9:16:14 AM

Owen

Canada

5554 posts since 6/5/2011

.... like Mike says: https://therubbercompany.com/extrusions-profiles/   

[If you can't find what you need there, you should consider changing your design.  cheeky     FWIW, I've never built an instrument case.... I used a "D section" seal on the home built fiberglass luggage box on my trike... in conjunction with a "lip/ledge" molded into the fiberglass it seems to do the job.]

Edited by - Owen on 04/01/2020 09:17:18

Apr 2, 2020 - 2:53:28 PM
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Paul R

Canada

12721 posts since 1/28/2010

quote:
Originally posted by Owen

.... like Mike says: https://therubbercompany.com/extrusions-profiles/   

[If you can't find what you need there, you should consider changing your design.  cheeky     FWIW, I've never built an instrument case.... I used a "D section" seal on the home built fiberglass luggage box on my trike... in conjunction with a "lip/ledge" molded into the fiberglass it seems to do the job.]


Using Owen's link, maybe go to window seals or some very small hosing. Or, if you have a sufficient length of copper wire, cut the insulation off and use that.

BTW, Owen, is this realy you? https://makeagif.com/gif/laugh-in-tricycle-rkSNl3

Apr 2, 2020 - 3:22:22 PM

Owen

Canada

5554 posts since 6/5/2011

Nope, not me.... you know that being the stickler that I am for obeying rules, I'd NEVER ride a trike on the sidewalk.  cheeky

I think the last time I was on a trike like the one in the gif was probably during hazing (?) as a rookie teacher in '68.   On my grown-up sized one [avatar pic] in 20 years I've not even had a close call... although I've twice had trouble with the timing belt that necessitated being "rescued,"  and one time in a heavy rain, water was splashing up into the back of the instrument cluster leaving me v-e-r-y relieved when home finally came into sight. 

Apr 2, 2020 - 3:36:40 PM
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

16503 posts since 6/5/2008

Instead of plywood which will be heavy, buy yourself a 4x8 sheet of mahogany plywood called "door skin."
It's work but you can cut it with a drywall knife if you have to. Maybe 1/8" to 5/32" thick.
Maybe a frame and sides with plywood but door skin is great to sheet over large surfaces . . . . .like doors.

Apr 2, 2020 - 5:54:43 PM
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Iron Paw

New Zealand

418 posts since 11/28/2014

I had a wooden case built years ago for my target rifle. The cabinet maker showed me the easy way to do this.
The easy way (you do really want the base and the lid to actually line up don't you?), is to build a completely enclosed case first.
He used dressed pine for the sides of the case. Something like 12.5mm thick (USA = 1/2"), and total height to be what 'you' need to give your rifle clearance when the lid is shut down.
In my case (no pun intended) it was about 85mm - 90mm. You might need 100mm or so.
Cut the pine to suit the length and width you need for the case. 2 pieces for the long sides, and 2 pieces for the ends (short sides).
He glued and lightly nailed the pine frame, and then dropped it on to a sheet of 3 ply that he had already cut to size.
This was glued and nailed (or pinned, or screwed) to the pine frame.
Flipped it over and mounted the other piece of ply.
Now he had made a completely enclosed box that was big enough to hold the rifle.
When the glue setup, he ran his skilsaw right around the entire pine frame to cut the box into 2 pieces. One piece was the lid, and the other piece was the main body of the case...so he cut about 30mm down all around.
Now we had a case that was ~30mm thickness for the lid, and ~60mm thickness for the main body.
And...the best bit is that the 2 pieces were a perfect fit/match as they had been made as one to start with.
A quick smoothing of the saw cut, then a piano hinge (brass) screwed into the frame and my new case was finished.
It's easier to see it done than to describe it.
A light layer of foam glued inside is all you need really. I bunged in a couple of pieces of closed cell foam across the lid and case base to squash down onto the rifle woodwork to help 'jam' the rifle in so it wouldn't move around. Add on a suitcase type handle and job done...time to break out the varnish or tung oil.
It does make the whole job very quick and easy to do, and you aren't faffing about trying to make a case body and then a case lid, and trying to make them match up.

Edited by - Iron Paw on 04/02/2020 17:59:04

Apr 2, 2020 - 7:19:28 PM

Iron Paw

New Zealand

418 posts since 11/28/2014

Yes, I did see you want to make a double fiddle case...I'm just relating how my rifle case was made.
I'm sure the same method works for musical instruments too!

Apr 2, 2020 - 9:21:35 PM
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54508 posts since 12/14/2005


"Blueboy, best listen to your Paw! Or, in this case (maybe pun intended) your Iron Paw!"

-Iron Maw-

Also:

Before installing the handle, put the fiddles in,  stand it on edge, and roll it back & forth on a  piece of dowel or pipe, to find the CENTER of BALANCE..

Your wrist will love you for it!

Apr 2, 2020 - 9:25:09 PM

54508 posts since 12/14/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Blue20Boy17

I have plans to build a double fiddle case. My plan is to build the shell from 1/4" plywood with solid blocks for the corners to support it better. I then plan to wrap it in white tolex. However, how can I put a rubber seal on this similar to those found on fiberglass cases to make the opening waterproof? The tolex is waterproof, so I want the gap between the case and the lid to be waterproof too.


I been to the store.

They ain't GOT no tolex paper, white nor other.

cheeky

Apr 2, 2020 - 10:06:22 PM
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

16503 posts since 6/5/2008

 



 

Edited by - Brian T on 04/02/2020 22:07:19

Apr 3, 2020 - 4:23:01 AM

banjoy

USA

8849 posts since 7/1/2006

Years ago I befriended LeRoy Weber, who made handmade Weber violin and viola cases and was famous in small circles for inventing the 4-point suspension feature seen in violin cases today. For years his cases held Issack Sterns violins as well as many others, today Musafia cases fit that bill.

What you are referring to is called a overlapping valance. Weber cases were the first to use a full overlap, when combined with the case cover, kept out the rain and elements.

Without knowing the full details of how you plan to match the case top to bottom, I can't really recommend any solutions, but your can search for valances online I think, they are made of rubber and some out of aluminum. I think LeRoy is still alive and kicking and last I spoke to him he was outside of Atlanta, GA. (In fact, I'm about to list on eBay two silk case blankets his wife made by hand about 15 years ago, old stock I still had left over from when I sold his cases).

But I can suggest that you reach out to current case makers, including LeRoy Weber. I would also suggest contacting Steve Bobleock down in the Philippines, he makes fantastic cases (but they don't have an overlapping valance) or you might reach out to Dimitri Musafia in Italy, for some design ideas.

And, finally, to me, the beauty of a case comes in large part with how you treat the interior, what materials, etc. And, finally, definitely incorporate a suspension feature in your design.

Good luck with this, maybe post some photos of your progress....?

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