Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

353
Banjo Lovers Online


Want to hide these Google ads? Join the Players Union!

Page: 1  2   Last Page (2) 

Mar 30, 2020 - 9:39:05 PM
72 posts since 11/2/2009

Advantages, disadvantages? I have always played simple songs and in G, and the licks are a little "trite".

What would be some good songs to take on out of the C position?

Mar 30, 2020 - 9:46:34 PM

1517 posts since 11/17/2018

Home Sweet Home

Mar 30, 2020 - 10:01:06 PM

248 posts since 9/29/2008

Sweet dixie

Mar 30, 2020 - 10:16:15 PM
like this

chuckv97

Canada

49222 posts since 10/5/2013

Try any song you know well and put it in C. You’ll gain lots doing that alone.

Mar 30, 2020 - 10:28:21 PM
like this

Mooooo

USA

7816 posts since 8/20/2016

The Hide Head Blues is really cool, and people love to hear it.

Mar 31, 2020 - 5:58:45 AM

3555 posts since 4/5/2008

Steve Martins The Crow.

( I  )====='----<: :}

Mar 31, 2020 - 6:49:53 AM
like this

RB3

USA

676 posts since 4/12/2004
Online Now

Fiddle players play a lot of fiddle tunes in the key of D. If you learn to play those tunes in the key of C, you can capo at the second fret, and be able to play them in the key of D. You'll then discover that you have more friends that are fiddle players.

Mar 31, 2020 - 7:04:09 AM
like this

3404 posts since 3/28/2008

If you play with female vocalists, you'll find that they'll often want to sing standard bluegrass repertoire in "C keys" like C, D, and E, instead of the "G keys" (G, A, Bb, B) that men usually prefer. So, as Chuck suggested above, you can work up a C version of any/every G song you know. That plus a capo will enable you to play the song in every common bluegrass key.

Start by making sure you know the chords in C. Then find the melody. Only then are you ready to make a real rolling arrangement. I'm working on this with several of my students right now. Maybe I can help you. I've been doing Skype lessons the last couple of weeks.

Mar 31, 2020 - 7:28:47 AM
likes this

conic

England

768 posts since 2/15/2014

quote:
Originally posted by Mooooo

The Hide Head Blues is really cool, and people love to hear it.


Wow thanks Moo, this is a new one to me, Jim Mills, what a different refreshing pickin sound. Is this in C tuning and not as the OP mentioned open G but "C" position, will have to get a Jim tab book.

Now, In the open G but "C" position I like to play Jambalaya, only two chords C & G, Back up and push & ragtime Annie

Mar 31, 2020 - 8:15:52 AM

7 posts since 1/13/2005

The Old Spinning Wheel. Start off with a backward roll

Mar 31, 2020 - 10:21:50 AM
like this

Mooooo

USA

7816 posts since 8/20/2016

quote:
Originally posted by conic
quote:
Originally posted by Mooooo

The Hide Head Blues is really cool, and people love to hear it.
 

Wow thanks Moo, this is a new one to me, Jim Mills, what a different refreshing pickin sound. Is this in C tuning and not as the OP mentioned open G but "C" position, will have to get a Jim tab book.

Now, In the open G but "C" position I like to play Jambalaya, only two chords C & G, Back up and push & ragtime Annie


I love the bluesy sound Jim is getting in this tune. It is a nice alternative than using the usual C licks.

This one's in Drop C, and all of these licks can be used in open G except the ones with that low C note which can be substituted with the middle C note (2nd string 1st fret). Any drop C tune will be good to learn if you want to play out of the C position, such as Home Sweet Home, Farewell Blues, or Nothing to It. In fact you can use the up the neck breaks from most G tunes and transfer them to the C position if they use the G/Em partial chord, which is the same as playing the C chord licks down the neck.

I like to play Fireball Mail (and many others) out of the C position because it is way out of my singing range in G. I usually capo up and play it in Eb.

Learning the C position licks helps playing in many different keys especially when you use them like the UTN open G licks. You can play in many keys all over the neck. I find it fun to play Fireball Mail, You get a line and I'll Get a Pole, etc....starting in G then going around the Circle of 5ths, so from G to C to F to Bb to Eb and they all sound good with the open G string, and it's great practice playing out of your comfort zone. Well, then it's not such a hard stretch to apply all the other tunes you learn out of the C position to all these keys. Then you spike your 5th string and learn how to use even more keys, and soon you can get around without a capo, using only spikes.

Also, the OP made no requirements that the C position suggestions be in open G. The learning you get playing Drop C tunes is worthwhile, and most of the licks will be transferrable to the C position using open G tuning.

Edited by - Mooooo on 03/31/2020 10:27:25

Mar 31, 2020 - 1:31:45 PM
like this

10755 posts since 2/12/2011

Engineers Don't Wave From The Trains Anymore - Tom T. & Earl

Mar 31, 2020 - 2:02:20 PM

conic

England

768 posts since 2/15/2014

great Mike, you cant get this from a book, plenty to practice now

Mar 31, 2020 - 2:12:22 PM
likes this

72 posts since 11/2/2009

quote:
Originally posted by Ira Gitlin

If you play with female vocalists, you'll find that they'll often want to sing standard bluegrass repertoire in "C keys" like C, D, and E, instead of the "G keys" (G, A, Bb, B) that men usually prefer. 

So after you ask someone their horoscope sign, you casually mention that you play bluegrass in the key of C?

Mar 31, 2020 - 2:16:16 PM
likes this

chuckv97

Canada

49222 posts since 10/5/2013

Yep.. C is the men’s key, signifying Courage

Edited by - chuckv97 on 03/31/2020 14:16:55

Mar 31, 2020 - 2:24:28 PM

72 posts since 11/2/2009

I went to iTunes to see if they had the Hide Head Blues, and didn’t think I would find anything, and there it was released in 2006. Both things surprised me! And I enjoyed it and bought it.

Edited by - gcpicken on 03/31/2020 14:25:10

Mar 31, 2020 - 3:01:52 PM
like this

3404 posts since 3/28/2008

quote:
Originally posted by gcpicken
quote:
Originally posted by Ira Gitlin

If you play with female vocalists, you'll find that they'll often want to sing standard bluegrass repertoire in "C keys" like C, D, and E, instead of the "G keys" (G, A, Bb, B) that men usually prefer. 

So after you ask someone their horoscope sign, you casually mention that you play bluegrass in the key of C?


It's probably better to wait until the second date.

Mar 31, 2020 - 3:08:35 PM
like this

4122 posts since 6/15/2005

Kansas City Railroad Blues
East Tennessee Blues
Billy in the Lowground
Beaumont Rag
Ragtime Annie
Back Up and Push
Alabama Jubilee

Mar 31, 2020 - 4:10:05 PM

Fathand

Canada

11583 posts since 2/7/2008

Scruggs:
Toy Heart
Farewell Blues
Coal Miner Blues
Reno:
World is Waiting for a Sunrise
Baby Face
Washington Lee Swing

I also like playing Muss I Denn ( Wooden Heart)

Mar 31, 2020 - 5:33:30 PM
likes this

doryman

USA

814 posts since 11/26/2012

quote:
Originally posted by chuckv97

Yep.. C is the men’s key, signifying Courage


Not if you go low.

Apr 1, 2020 - 6:58:12 AM
like this

24 posts since 2/7/2020

Playing in the key of C is as easy as moving your up-the-neck breaks down seven frets. Playing in D is moving the UTN break down five frets (advantage of having the low root note without retuning). This assumes that you know how to play UTN first, though.

IMO you can tell what caliber of banjo player you're playing with by calling a tune/song in F and seeing what they do.

Apr 3, 2020 - 11:28:27 AM

adl1132

USA

161 posts since 12/18/2012

Mississippi Sawyer
Denver Belle
Cotton Patch Rag
Rawhide (tho' most capo up for this instead)

Apr 4, 2020 - 4:43:02 AM
likes this

3440 posts since 12/6/2009

did she mention my name....
your love is like a flower.....
farewell blues.....
little Annie....
seeing Nellie home....

and don't for get drop C....(4th string C)
another thing that makes it easier for me is using the index more as the lead finger instead of the thumb because a lot of picking in open C is the B and D strings...IMHO

and by the way. Im a hairy legged male....who sings in C as I do in D.....A. G .E .F.B it depends on the song range

Edited by - overhere on 04/04/2020 04:46:17

Apr 6, 2020 - 5:24:20 PM
like this

3434 posts since 5/6/2004

Two of the advantages — in terms of technique — that I found were helped by playing in C were: (1) more of the melody falls on the 1st string, so you have to develop patterns (and not just a backward roll) that lead with your middle finger; and (2) because the melody is on a higher string, it will tend to move up the neck more than songs in G. This accustoms you to using more of the neck while you play, changing chord inversions mid-roll.

One of the songs that helped me with this technique was “Eight More Miles to Louisville” in C.

By the way, if you're playing a song that takes you up and down the neck, with lots of chord inversions, you may also discover that you can maintain the same right-hand pattern without it sounding boring. Changing chords so frequently eliminates the need to change picking patterns. 

Edited by - Rich Weill on 04/06/2020 17:29:57

Apr 11, 2020 - 11:15:40 AM

135 posts since 4/19/2011

Most of Uncle Dave Macon's tunes are great in C tuning.


Apr 13, 2020 - 8:11:21 PM

kyeates

Canada

4 posts since 10/11/2011

@gcpicken
I guess I am really out to lunch here. Maybe this has already been addressed but I didn't see it. I have never heard the term C position. I know my chords as barre, F form and D form. What is the C Position?

Page: 1  2   Last Page (2) 

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.34375