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Mar 30, 2020 - 7:48:49 AM
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143 posts since 7/25/2013

Mar 30, 2020 - 8:36:16 AM
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6574 posts since 8/30/2004

Good work Eli,
Imagine what Earl, Sonny, J.D., Allen Shelton could have been if they had known all this theory even though they all used these intervals in their playing. I teach it every day at NYU but only to Classical students...keep up the brilliant work Eli...Jack

Mar 30, 2020 - 12:57:53 PM

maxmax

Sweden

1409 posts since 8/1/2005

Hey Eli, thanks a lot for the lesson, this is just the stuff I need to work on!

Can I ask a basic question to you or Jack or anyone here that has the time to answer? I really would like a better understanding of this stuff.

I'm used to playing the chords in the G scale with the different shapes, but I'm getting hung up on a thing regarding the 6ths.

Right when you start out at the G chord using the F shape, using the third and first strings to get the B and G notes, you say that's a 6th. But wouldn't the 6th of B be G#? Or what 6th are you referring to?

When you get into the minor chords of that sequence it works out when there are two frets between the third and the first string. And when you are using the D shaped chords it works on the major chords but also gives it a sharp when using the minor chords.

So again are you not referring to 6ths starting with whatever note you are playing on the third string? Or does it not matter if the 6ths is sharped or not? I guess it's some sort of 6th after all?

Hope this makes sense. Thanks!
Max

Mar 30, 2020 - 1:05:16 PM
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143 posts since 7/25/2013

quote:
Originally posted by maxmax

Hey Eli, thanks a lot for the lesson, this is just the stuff I need to work on!

Can I ask a basic question to you or Jack or anyone here that has the time to answer? I really would like a better understanding of this stuff.

I'm used to playing the chords in the G scale with the different shapes, but I'm getting hung up on a thing regarding the 6ths.

Right when you start out at the G chord using the F shape, using the third and first strings to get the B and G notes, you say that's a 6th. But wouldn't the 6th of B be G#? Or what 6th are you referring to?

When you get into the minor chords of that sequence it works out when there are two frets between the third and the first string. And when you are using the D shaped chords it works on the major chords but also gives it a sharp when using the minor chords.

So again are you not referring to 6ths starting with whatever note you are playing on the third string? Or does it not matter if the 6ths is sharped or not? I guess it's some sort of 6th after all?

Hope this makes sense. Thanks!
Max


Hey Max! There are actually two kinds of 6ths, Major 6ths and Minor 6ths. An example of a Major 6th would be C-A, and an example of a minor 6th would be B-G. Because of the shape of the major scale, it just works out that some are Major and some are Minor, like 3rds, or 7ths.

A major 6th has 9 Half-Steps (C-Db-D-Eb-E-F-Gb-G-Ab-A)

And a minor 6th has 8 (B-C-Db-D-Eb-E-F-Gb-G)

That is what causes the different 6ths to have different shapes and sounds on the fretboard. Hope that helps!

Mar 30, 2020 - 1:16:40 PM

maxmax

Sweden

1409 posts since 8/1/2005

Oh yeah of course, that explains it! I appreciate it very much, thanks!
Max

Mar 30, 2020 - 1:59:46 PM

10740 posts since 2/12/2011

good stuff - thanks Eli - Trischka also did a nice little piece on this

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