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Need a wider neck on my Oscar Schmidt OB-5

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Mar 28, 2020 - 7:09:05 PM
1 posts since 3/28/2020

I have a mid 80's Oscar Schmidt OB-5. The neck is too narrow for my fat fingers. I would love to put a wider neck on it.

Does anyone know where I an find a wider neck that would be an easy retrofit?

Thanks....

Mar 28, 2020 - 8:11:58 PM

2165 posts since 12/31/2005

If you found a neck, it would probably need to be fitted. That is an aluminum pot banjo, correct? Any neck would likely cost more than the banjo, and having it fitted would add even more to the cost. Most necks would be set up to accept coordinator rods, which I doubt yours has.

Gold Tone makes models with wider necks, including the CC-100RW (the w stands for wide) and others that are 1 5/16" wide.   I had one of the blem 100RW's for a while and it was great to play.   Loved the neck width.  Gold Tone has a "B Stock page" where they have slightly blemished models at a discount.  If you find a model you like but don't see it listed, give them a call.  They might have one lying around.

Mar 28, 2020 - 8:31:54 PM

Omeboy

USA

2407 posts since 6/27/2013

That's a unique arrangement on the OB5's neck to rim attachment. Given the way your single coordinator rod configures to the heel of your neck with its in-set bolt adjustment, you'll probably have to get a good luthier to make a custom fit for you if you do find a neck. Your best bet is to buy a good banjo with a neck you can live with because an expensive luthier job on a low end banjo is not a good use for anyone's time or money. Look to trade up from your OB5 to a better instrument.

Mar 28, 2020 - 9:21:42 PM

Omeboy

USA

2407 posts since 6/27/2013

As an alternative if you keep the OB5 rim, you could have a luthier turn it 45 degrees and drill it to take the lag bolts of a different neck so it could take a new set of coordinators rods. That might work out for you. Good luck in any event. @mike603

Edited by - Omeboy on 03/28/2020 21:23:04

Mar 29, 2020 - 6:53:50 AM
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7056 posts since 8/28/2013

Fitting a neck to an inexpensive banjo like yours would not be worth the money or the time. Try to find a banjo that better fits your needs.

Mar 30, 2020 - 5:40:08 PM
Players Union Member

Helix

USA

12539 posts since 8/30/2006

Ok first, welcome to the hangout

It’s a one rod neck

The neck removes easily, but left handed hook bolts suck

It depends on how handy you are

One can install Hips along the side of the neck but you have to
re install longer frets to get the 1-1/4”. You are looking for
1-3/8” is ok. 1-5/16” is for giants

Specialty necks are handmade

Mar 30, 2020 - 6:03:04 PM

7605 posts since 1/7/2005

How narrow is your neck, and how fat are your fingers? Remember that the space you have to place your finger into is twice the space between the strings. for example, if you are fretting your third string, you have the whole space between the fourth and the second string to insert your finger. If your finger is fatter than that, you may indeed need a custom neck. But it would be very unusual. More likely, you are placing your fingers on the strings at an angle. Try to press the string with the tip of your fingers rather than the flat of the pad.
DD

Mar 31, 2020 - 5:27:26 AM
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7056 posts since 8/28/2013

Good reasoning from Dan Drabek. Some beginners tend to play with flat fingers or wrap their hands too far around the banjo's neck, resulting in fingers that don't come straight down on the individual strings.

I have no idea how long you've been playing, and you may indeed need a wider neck, but hand and finger positioning is something to check first.

Edited by - G Edward Porgie on 03/31/2020 05:28:13

Mar 31, 2020 - 10:40:36 AM
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3873 posts since 5/12/2010

Coordinator rods don't make a lot of sense on an aluminum pot banjo, and I am confused about the suggestion of "turning t 45 degrees" to drill it for them.

I agree that a custom made neck would cost more than the banjo in question is worth. It makes more sense to upgrade to a banjo that better suits the need.

Should you decide to upgrade there are a lot of good choices of production made banjos to fit just about any budget.

A custom made banjo will usually cost more, but some aren't as expensive as others, it varies widely between builders.

Apr 1, 2020 - 5:10:37 AM
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Players Union Member

Helix

USA

12539 posts since 8/30/2006

He's thinking of a double-necked banjo, one neck mounted 45 degrees from the other neck. I've never seen anything like that.

Apr 1, 2020 - 9:04:23 AM

7056 posts since 8/28/2013

quote:
Originally posted by Helix

He's thinking of a double-necked banjo, one neck mounted 45 degrees from the other neck. I've never seen anything like that.


I don't think he's offering that suggestion as a double-necker at all, and I suspect you may be joking.

The problem with re-necking this single co-rod banjo is that the single rod uses a rather large hole at the neck, which could be problematic when using two co-rods. Turning the rim ninety degrees removes that large hole from the equation.

devilAs an added bonus, should the player choose to perform while standing, he could bolt a strut into that hole, which is now facing downward, to help support the banjo's weight, thus taking the strain off his shoulders. devil

Apr 1, 2020 - 8:26:42 PM
Players Union Member

Helix

USA

12539 posts since 8/30/2006

Regardless, I want to see what the OP has in mind.

Apr 2, 2020 - 5:06:19 AM

3873 posts since 5/12/2010

I have seen double necked guitars, but not sure how such a thing would work on a round bodied instrument. wink

All seriousness aside, I did assume the OP to mean rotating the neck on the pot to move it away from the large hole for the current neck bolt attachment, I just don't see a reason to install two coordinator rods onto an alluminum rim in the first place.

An intended purpose of coordinator rods, other than attaching the neck, is to make slight adustment to the string action by  warping the rim wall a bit. I never have liked this idea, but some do consider it an advantage, but it will only work on a wodden rim, not on a cast metal rim. 

Edited by - OldPappy on 04/02/2020 05:14:16

Apr 2, 2020 - 6:49:51 AM

7056 posts since 8/28/2013

The advantage of two coordinator rods on any rim is that now you have two lag screws that can pull loose from the neck heel and will need to be repaired. devil

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