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Next best thing to lynx crossing the road....

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Feb 28, 2020 - 1:55:59 PM
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Owen

Canada

5178 posts since 6/5/2011

... might just be a pack of wolves in your front yard.     Apparently it was in Quebec... I'm having a bit of trouble getting sound with the video [hopefully it works]: 

https://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=1909962

Edited by - Owen on 02/28/2020 14:01:28

Feb 28, 2020 - 2:05:14 PM
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Players Union Member

DC5

USA

10067 posts since 6/30/2015

I don't get nervous generally about wildlife, but I think that would have me a tad jumpy.

Feb 29, 2020 - 2:22:01 AM

53939 posts since 12/14/2005

Disney's "Peter & The Wolf", seen when quite young, gave me an irrational fear of wolves.

Feb 29, 2020 - 3:01:03 AM

mander

USA

4214 posts since 10/7/2007

We have coyotes in our backyard all the time. It was worse when we had chickens. They'd come hunting in the day time as well. I got sick of hearing "they are more afraid of you than you are of them."
Ha! The only fear they have when they look at me is, "Will she give me indigestion? Oh, who cares, I'm hungry."

Feb 29, 2020 - 3:02:46 AM
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mander

USA

4214 posts since 10/7/2007

quote:
Originally posted by mike gregory

Disney's "Peter & The Wolf", seen when quite young, gave me an irrational fear of wolves.

 

One of my all time favorite pieces of classical music! It is why I love the name Peter! And the oboe! 

Feb 29, 2020 - 5:15:38 AM
Players Union Member

DC5

USA

10067 posts since 6/30/2015

quote:
Originally posted by mander

We have coyotes in our backyard all the time. It was worse when we had chickens. They'd come hunting in the day time as well. I got sick of hearing "they are more afraid of you than you are of them."
Ha! The only fear they have when they look at me is, "Will she give me indigestion? Oh, who cares, I'm hungry."


Coyotes don't hunt in packs, and they are urbanizing.  I don't lke seeing them in the yard, but generally don't fear them.  Wolves are very different critters.

Feb 29, 2020 - 7:02:17 AM

Owen

Canada

5178 posts since 6/5/2011

When we were trying to farm, we had lots of coyotes around, but I figure "more coyotes = less mice."  The farm dog seemed to keep them at bay so far as coming into the yard.  We  never had chickens, but never had any problems re. new-born calves, etc.  Only ever saw [a pair of] wolves once and when they saw my truck, they immediately scooted off into the nearby bush.   Black bears also called the area home.   I don't recall factoring in the presence of wildlife when I or the kiddos went into the bush [kids just gotta build forts] or across the fields [to visit Granny... a la LRRHood].   Hunting season was a different story. 

Feb 29, 2020 - 8:46:31 AM

mander

USA

4214 posts since 10/7/2007

quote:
Originally posted by DC5
quote:
Originally posted by mander

We have coyotes in our backyard all the time. It was worse when we had chickens. They'd come hunting in the day time as well. I got sick of hearing "they are more afraid of you than you are of them."
Ha! The only fear they have when they look at me is, "Will she give me indigestion? Oh, who cares, I'm hungry."


Coyotes don't hunt in packs, and they are urbanizing.  I don't lke seeing them in the yard, but generally don't fear them.  Wolves are very different critters.


According to the Portland Audobon Society, they do.

https://audubonportland.org/our-work/rehabilitate-wildlife/having-a-wildlife-problem/coyote/

There were five of them all together hunting in my yard one day and they didn't run off until our three sons came out of the house and chased them off. To me, five is a pack. Is there a specific number greater than that required? 

Feb 29, 2020 - 11:30:15 AM

173 posts since 8/25/2009

About 40 years ago, when coyotes were starting to come back East, I had a two year assignment in Down-East Maine. There was an article in the Bangor newspaper about a guy who went off into the woods with his chainsaw to get some wood. Next thing he knew two coyotes were stalking him. He dropped the saw, ran back to his pickup truck and jumped in the bed. Eventually both coyotes got on the same side of the truck, he opened the door, got inside and came out with his lever action. The coyotes took off. Apparently they recognized the difference between a chainsaw and a rifle.

And, they weren't afraid of the chainsaw -or the man carrying itsmiley

Feb 29, 2020 - 11:42:24 AM

RonR

USA

1610 posts since 11/29/2012
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I was in Griffith Park in Los Angeles at the playground with my daughter and grandsons when a coyote walked right through the center of the playground area filled with children.I dont know if he was looking for a snack, but the Californians seemed unfazed by it.

Feb 29, 2020 - 12:33:38 PM
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1606 posts since 2/10/2013

I once watched an outdoor video documentary on wolves. The narrator remarked that we humans retain an unjustified dislike for animals which were at one time our competitors in the food chain.

Feb 29, 2020 - 1:49:42 PM

bubbalouie

Canada

13428 posts since 9/27/2007

I wonder what those wolves were sniffing for. Dogs or deer scent? 

Here's this. https://i.imgur.com/TPcmQvo.gifv

Mar 1, 2020 - 12:28:25 AM

Paul R

Canada

12438 posts since 1/28/2010

We also have coywolves, a hybrid of wolves and coyotes.

Coyotes in packs? We've heard them on the kill, at night, from our house, howling.

Coyotes moved into High Park, in the old City of Toronto, when we were still there, and |I was on the park's committee. They even frequented the off-leash dog area, in search of canine snacks. There were some idiots in the neighbourhood who fed them. We had a public meeting. Was when we were well into our efforts to restore the natural environment of the park. It seems that coyotes would come with the territory. Besides, they'd "been introduced" to the Canada geese, who were a nuisance. It seemed like a good match.

The first coyote I ever saw was standing as bold as you please near the Grenadier Restaurant in the park as I was cycling. It looked as if nothing could intimidate it, downright mean and tough.

Mar 1, 2020 - 6:39:56 AM

Owen

Canada

5178 posts since 6/5/2011

I dunno about the "on the kill part," ... they do a lot of hunting in the daytime, but precious little howling 'til after dark.

In addition to other purposes of howling, I think coyotes howl for the sheer fun of it.... kinda like the reason some of us have a banjo.  As a kid, I'd more or less perfected (?) my rendition of a coyote howling*.  As darkness fell in summer, I could entice coyotes to return my howling... once one pack answered, it was quite normal for a couple of more to join in.  [I was raised in an area of west central MB, where there was still probably an average of 40 acres of bush and sloughs per 1/4 section, and with a number of creek valleys whose agric. use would have been limited to pasture.]  I was good (?) enuff that on one occasion, a couple of my brothers had been out to shut the hens in for the night, and I was coincidentally returning from the outhouse.  I laid down on the path [maybe 25 yards from where they were] and let 'er rip. When we were all  back in  the house my brothers were commenting on "Boy, the coyotes are sure close tonight.  Etc."  To this day, I've not given them any reason to change their minds.

Paul, I think those mean and tough coyotes are getting that way due to the environment.  Their country cousins are a pretty meek and skittish lot.

Edit: i.e.  the expressive part, not the receptive part..... for us retired teachers.  wink

Edited by - Owen on 03/01/2020 06:52:03

Mar 1, 2020 - 7:17:24 AM

Owen

Canada

5178 posts since 6/5/2011

....and along the vein of ^ ... when my dad was a young adult (1930s) he ran his own threshing outfit.  He told us about the time he walked [via moonlight] about 5 miles cross-country [through one of those valleys and a alongside a couple of 1/4s of bush pasture] home from where they had spent the day threshing. He remarked that even though he knew the coyotes wouldn't harm him, and that they were probably 1/4 or 1/2 mile away, they nevertheless sounded like they were right next to his pathway and it never failed to raise the hair on the back of his neck. 

Mar 1, 2020 - 9:27:40 AM
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Paul R

Canada

12438 posts since 1/28/2010

Well, there was a grunting sort of sound, possibly a deer (of course, it was late at night, I couldn't see anything), followed by a rather excited series of howls. It sure sounded like they were onto something. It wasn't like they were singing around the campfire.

Mar 1, 2020 - 9:55:46 AM

Owen

Canada

5178 posts since 6/5/2011

You've done it again, Paul!!......  forced me to consult the all-knowing Google: https://wildlifehelp.org/solution/district-columbia/coyote/should-i-be-concerned-if-i-hear-coyotes-howling-yipping-or-barking/93

...and furthermore, grunting followed by excited noises [" ...yes! yes! oh...YES!"] can sometimes be indicative of other activity. wink

Edited by - Owen on 03/01/2020 09:56:43

Mar 1, 2020 - 10:00:14 AM

1076 posts since 8/7/2017

Contact with humanity changes the behaviour of all species, if they wish to survive. Animals (mammals, birds, fish, don't know about reptiles, but I expect them too) appear "tame" in many old tales. This was probably not just a story, but fact. Even today, if the animals figure out you are not a threat, they display less fear reaction. For example, the turkeys (wild, released domestic, hybrids) in our area spend the winter in our yard (they scrounge for birdseed under our 2 feeders...lots get dropped....well, you try eating sunflower seeds with chopsticks, that's what song birds have to pick them up, if you think about it (beaks)). Likewise, deer recognize my wife and I, and know from experience we are not predating on them. These and other wildlife act quite differently when they see us vs. when they see visitors and other strangers. To think that biologists, when I was growing up, scoffed when anyone asked them "Can animals think?"....biologists can sure be dumb (hey, I am a biologist, so I can cast aspersions on my tribe).

Human population growth impinges on former wild lands. Our un-constrained population growth squeezes animals out of their home grounds. We are all going to see more scary creatures (i.e. fellow predators) in our immediate vicinity more and more often. If legal, carry a gun (and learn how to shoot safely); if guns are out of the question, then carrying pepper spray, or wasp spray (suggested in another thread by DC5, I never thought of it), will help. Animals in packs (eg. human teenagers and adults of all ages and species) act more aggressively than when on their lonesome. Pepper spray comes in convenient-sized containers, some come with holsters for same. If you are offended to have to arm yourself in your own suburban neighborhood, then move back to the City (to avoid the non-human predators, anyway).

Mar 1, 2020 - 10:47:14 AM
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Paul R

Canada

12438 posts since 1/28/2010

quote:
Originally posted by Owen

You've done it again, Paul!!......  forced me to consult the all-knowing Google: https://wildlifehelp.org/solution/district-columbia/coyote/should-i-be-concerned-if-i-hear-coyotes-howling-yipping-or-barking/93

...and furthermore, grunting followed by excited noises [" ...yes! yes! oh...YES!"] can sometimes be indicative of other activity. wink


Re: your last paragraph.

When we were looking to move to Kingston, we made some exploratory visits. One time the Mrs. called various hotels and found them all booked. Then she phoned one called the Rest Inn. Not only was it available, it had the cheapest price. So she contacted our daughter, who was at Queen's U. Daughter asked around, and was told it was the "hooker hotel". Well, we were booked in anyway. The Mrs. went down early, and I took the bus after school. I got there after dark and walked some distance to Princess Street. I walked up and down Princess for a small eternity but couldn't find the place. Finally I walked farther up Princess and located the place. It was after midnight. The Mrs, had waited up for me, but soon was fast asleep. I was lying awake when I suddenly heard a rhythmic ee-ee ee-ee squeaking noise from the room above - the sound of bedsprings  - "indicative of other activity"! Daughter's friends were right in their assessment of the place.

I never heard such sounds from our coyote friends.

Mar 2, 2020 - 10:26:46 AM

2228 posts since 7/20/2004

We have a pack of wolves that inhabit the territory around our summer cabin up in the Chippewa National Forest in MN. I've heard them (no squeeking sounds), and seen their scat on the road, but never actually seen a wolf, though some of our neighbors have. One of our neighbors was a retired DNR officer who'd been in charge of the wolf program when they were reintroduced to the area many years ago. I've always thought it's kind of cool to have them nearby, but I do carry a gun when I walk the forest roads.

Mar 2, 2020 - 5:09:18 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

13428 posts since 9/27/2007

https://i.imgur.com/ldE0Ubc.gifv

Mice in space! Looks like that one guy had it all figured out!

Mar 2, 2020 - 6:13:38 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

13428 posts since 9/27/2007

quote:
Originally posted by Paul R
quote:
Originally posted by Owen

You've done it again, Paul!!......  forced me to consult the all-knowing Google: https://wildlifehelp.org/solution/district-columbia/coyote/should-i-be-concerned-if-i-hear-coyotes-howling-yipping-or-barking/93

...and furthermore, grunting followed by excited noises [" ...yes! yes! oh...YES!"] can sometimes be indicative of other activity. wink


Re: your last paragraph.

When we were looking to move to Kingston, we made some exploratory visits. One time the Mrs. called various hotels and found them all booked. Then she phoned one called the Rest Inn. Not only was it available, it had the cheapest price. So she contacted our daughter, who was at Queen's U. Daughter asked around, and was told it was the "hooker hotel". Well, we were booked in anyway. The Mrs. went down early, and I took the bus after school. I got there after dark and walked some distance to Princess Street. I walked up and down Princess for a small eternity but couldn't find the place. Finally I walked farther up Princess and located the place. It was after midnight. The Mrs, had waited up for me, but soon was fast asleep. I was lying awake when I suddenly heard a rhythmic ee-ee ee-ee squeaking noise from the room above - the sound of bedsprings  - "indicative of other activity"! Daughter's friends were right in their assessment of the place.

I never heard such sounds from our coyote friends.


Paul That would be the Commodore Hotel maybe? There weren't any 4 legged coyotes In K-Town when I lived there! surprise

Mar 2, 2020 - 8:09:07 PM
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Paul R

Canada

12438 posts since 1/28/2010

It was called the Rest Inn, on Princess before you get to Bath Road. I think it's a HoJo now. Funny how all these places change ownership. This was in '01. The HoJo on Ontario Street (beside the Lone Star) is something else, too. There aren't four-legged coyotes, but there are two-legged cougars.

Mar 2, 2020 - 8:12:56 PM

Paul R

Canada

12438 posts since 1/28/2010

quote:
Originally posted by Owen

You've done it again, Paul!!......  forced me to consult the all-knowing Google: https://wildlifehelp.org/solution/district-columbia/coyote/should-i-be-concerned-if-i-hear-coyotes-howling-yipping-or-barking/93

...and furthermore, grunting followed by excited noises [" ...yes! yes! oh...YES!"] can sometimes be indicative of other activity. wink


Geez, Owen, I thought this memory was safely buried, but you triggered it! When I lived in Rochdale, a couple moved into the other room in my "suite". You always knew when there was "other activity" happening 'cause she was a screamer. I had "management" find me another room.

Mar 2, 2020 - 8:25:56 PM
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53939 posts since 12/14/2005

quote:
Originally posted by bubbalouie

https://i.imgur.com/ldE0Ubc.gifv

Mice in space! Looks like that one guy had it all figured out!


"What one mouse can DREAM,  any mouse can DO!"

-W. Disney-

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