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Feb 27, 2020 - 5:50 AM

Davidprat

Spain

1087 posts since 8/10/2005

I am goin to build a 5+1 string banjo , so a five string banjo with and extra low string, what would be the nut width for such a banjo ?

Feb 27, 2020 - 6:11:38 AM

2895 posts since 5/29/2011

I made mine 1 3/16" wide. 1 7/32" might be more comfortable for bigger hands.

Feb 27, 2020 - 6:40:46 AM

mbanza

USA

2187 posts since 9/16/2007

I like to use millimeters for string spacing: makes the process painless. At the nut, 3 mm each side outboard and 8 mm between string centers works well, so number of strings minus one times 8 mm plus 6 will give you needed width: 38 mm.

By the way, 1 3/16 inch would work for four strings but is too narrow for five.

Feb 27, 2020 - 6:51:30 AM

886 posts since 11/22/2007

I use 1.5 in. nut width but I have relatively small hands.

Feb 27, 2020 - 6:57:31 AM

480 posts since 1/28/2013

You're gonna need a 1 1/2 at least. I have a 1 5/16th on my regular 5 string, and there's guys running 1 3/8ths on regular 5 strings.

Feb 27, 2020 - 7:03:28 AM
likes this

480 posts since 1/28/2013

quote:
Originally posted by mbanza

I like to use millimeters for string spacing: makes the process painless. At the nut, 3 mm each side outboard and 8 mm between string centers works well, so number of strings minus one times 8 mm plus 6 will give you needed width: 38 mm.

By the way, 1 3/16 inch would work for four strings but is too narrow for five.


Yeah, 1 3/16ths are a throwback to the Pre-Wars, and are too narrow today. I had to replace the 1 3/16 on my Huber Kalamazoo with a 1 5/16th. Steve Huber said he only makes narrow necks, so I had Ron Coleman build it and install it. Plays good now, but the neck says Gibson on the peghead. But since Huber says it's an exact replica of a Pre-War Gibson, I guess there's no problem. The narrow necks are a major flaw with Huber Banjos.

Edited by - jan dupree on 02/27/2020 07:04:10

Feb 27, 2020 - 7:56:27 AM

2895 posts since 5/29/2011

You fellows must have some huge hands.

Feb 27, 2020 - 9:07:03 AM

474 posts since 9/21/2018

First question, what is your string spacing? Are you basing this in a 1" spacing from normal 5 string?

Feb 27, 2020 - 9:09:15 AM

7565 posts since 1/7/2005

quote:
Originally posted by Culloden

You fellows must have some huge hands.


I assume they're talking about a 6 string banjo with 5 strings reaching to the nut.

DD

Feb 27, 2020 - 9:13:33 AM

474 posts since 9/21/2018

quote:
Originally posted by jan dupree
quote:
Originally posted by mbanza

I like to use millimeters for string spacing: makes the process painless. At the nut, 3 mm each side outboard and 8 mm between string centers works well, so number of strings minus one times 8 mm plus 6 will give you needed width: 38 mm.

By the way, 1 3/16 inch would work for four strings but is too narrow for five.


Yeah, 1 3/16ths are a throwback to the Pre-Wars, and are too narrow today. I had to replace the 1 3/16 on my Huber Kalamazoo with a 1 5/16th. Steve Huber said he only makes narrow necks, so I had Ron Coleman build it and install it. Plays good now, but the neck says Gibson on the peghead. But since Huber says it's an exact replica of a Pre-War Gibson, I guess there's no problem. The narrow necks are a major flaw with Huber Banjos.


I prefer the classic width, but I've got stubby sausage fingers. 

Feb 27, 2020 - 9:15:46 AM
Players Union Member

rudy

USA

14988 posts since 3/27/2004

quote:
Originally posted by Culloden

You fellows must have some huge hands.


With even a somewhat narrow 3/32" outer string center to neck edge you crammed 5 strings into a 1" spacing?

Feb 27, 2020 - 10:53:57 AM

2895 posts since 5/29/2011

My mistake. It is 1 3/8" wide, not 1 3/16".

Feb 27, 2020 - 11:48:48 AM

173 posts since 8/25/2009

A mathematician's straightforward approach (if there is such a thingsmiley) is to start with a five string banjo whose spacing you like. Measure the nut (or the neck at the nut ). Then measure the distance from the first string slot to the fourth string slot. Since there are four strings, there are three inter-string spaces, so divide by three and add to the width of the neck. That will give you room for one more string.

For example, your favorite banjo has 1 3/8" from one side of the neck (or nut) to the other. The distance from the first string slot to the fourth string slot is exactly 1 1/8". Dividing 1 1/8" = 9/8" by 3 gives 3/8". Adding 3/8" of an inch to 1 3/8" yields 1 6/8" = 1 3/4".

If your favorite banjo has 1 1/4" from one side of the neck (or nut) to the other and the distance from the first string slot to the fourth string slot is exactly 1". Dividing 1" by 3 gives 1/3". Adding 1/3" of an inch to 1 1/4" yields 1 7/12" = 1.5833.

Oh, you don't have a favorite banjo handysad   Take your ruler down to your neighborhood banjo store, find a banjo you like and measure it upsmiley

Good luck,

Bill.

Feb 27, 2020 - 12:16:54 PM

480 posts since 1/28/2013

1-5/8ths would probably be a good width. That is just slightly less than a narrow width guitar guitar neck.

Feb 27, 2020 - 12:20:18 PM
likes this

480 posts since 1/28/2013

quote:
Originally posted by Moose_Roberts
quote:
Originally posted by jan dupree
quote:
Originally posted by mbanza

I like to use millimeters for string spacing: makes the process painless. At the nut, 3 mm each side outboard and 8 mm between string centers works well, so number of strings minus one times 8 mm plus 6 will give you needed width: 38 mm.

By the way, 1 3/16 inch would work for four strings but is too narrow for five.


Yeah, 1 3/16ths are a throwback to the Pre-Wars, and are too narrow today. I had to replace the 1 3/16 on my Huber Kalamazoo with a 1 5/16th. Steve Huber said he only makes narrow necks, so I had Ron Coleman build it and install it. Plays good now, but the neck says Gibson on the peghead. But since Huber says it's an exact replica of a Pre-War Gibson, I guess there's no problem. The narrow necks are a major flaw with Huber Banjos.


I prefer the classic width, but I've got stubby sausage fingers. 


I like a lot of space between strings at the bridge for easy accurate picking. My banjo has a 1-7/8ths. spaced bridge. That's twice as wide as a Crowe spaced bridge.

Feb 27, 2020 - 4:52:41 PM

mbanza

USA

2187 posts since 9/16/2007

Jan: "I like a lot of space between strings at the bridge for easy accurate picking. My banjo has a 1-7/8ths. spaced bridge. That's twice as wide as a Crowe spaced bridge."

You'll have to clarify the "twice as wide" part. The total difference between Crowe(1 3/4) and 1 7/8 is 0.125 inch from string one to string five. In other words, 0.125/4 = 0.0313 inch more between adjacent strings.

Mar 1, 2020 - 9:45:21 AM

480 posts since 1/28/2013

quote:
Originally posted by mbanza

Jan: "I like a lot of space between strings at the bridge for easy accurate picking. My banjo has a 1-7/8ths. spaced bridge. That's twice as wide as a Crowe spaced bridge."

You'll have to clarify the "twice as wide" part. The total difference between Crowe(1 3/4) and 1 7/8 is 0.125 inch from string one to string five. In other words, 0.125/4 = 0.0313 inch more between adjacent strings.


It's basically 3 times wider than a standard spaced bridge. They usually just go by the total slot spacing from the 1st -5th slot.. The slots are usually cut  in increments of 1/16th. from 1st.-5th. total. A standard bridge is 1 11/16ths. too narrow for many modern players. Crowe is 1 3/4, my bridge is 1 7/8s. My experience is, I don't see much difference between a Crowe bridge and standard, 1/16th wider is not enough.. I've heard some guys running with a 2 inch bridge. Some guys will even customize the string spacing, like have more space between the 1st and 2nd strings than the 4th and 5th. or the 4th string spaced further from the 3rd. etc. Mine are evenly spaced, but forgot the actual string spacing.

Edited by - jan dupree on 03/01/2020 09:56:41

Mar 1, 2020 - 3:34:04 PM

mbanza

USA

2187 posts since 9/16/2007

Thank you, Jan, I now understand what you mean.

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