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Where and by Whom Did You First Hear This?

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Feb 24, 2020 - 9:35:36 PM
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chuckv97

Canada

47624 posts since 10/5/2013
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This one’s been rolling around in my head for decades...
youtu.be/7_EmmesJCfM


 

Edited by - chuckv97 on 02/24/2020 21:37:29

Feb 24, 2020 - 9:59:23 PM
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chuckv97

Canada

47624 posts since 10/5/2013
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Steve Gillette and Tom Campbell wrote it - I first heard it on an Ian & Sylvia album in the ‘60’s. Of interest:
“There’s a bit of a folk mythology surrounding the song that stems from a story that Ian Tyson spun years ago. He claimed Gillette and Campbell wrote "Darcy Farrow" to fool a college professor into thinking they’d discovered a previously unknown traditional song.”

Feb 24, 2020 - 10:47:47 PM
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Chris Meakin

Australia

2775 posts since 5/15/2011

I first heard it in my office, today, played by a very good guitarist by the name of Mr C. V. 97.

That was ace Chuck. Well done.

Feb 24, 2020 - 10:52:13 PM
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79 posts since 10/4/2018

i first heard it on the banjo hangout about a minute ago by you

Feb 25, 2020 - 1:45:52 AM
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Helix

USA

12348 posts since 8/30/2006

True, it was Steve Gillette and Tom Campbell, but they had another collaborator, an unnamed aspiring hollow wood actress,whose name we would know if they would just tell us, darn.  
It doesn't rhyme, but I've driven through Walker Lake many times and the lights of Yarrington town.

I missed Ian and Sylvia by one day in New York in Greenwich Village when I got out of the Army in '67, so I went back that evening to Gerde's Folk City to see Steve Gillette for the first time. He is one of the best "hybrid"pickers I've ever heard. Name another: Nancy Wilson of Heart.

Later I saw Steve at the Vanguard Coffeehouse in Kansas City.
Much later again, we were able to sponsor Steve Gillette and Cindy Mangsun at fiddlersdream.org in Phoenix about 5 times, now.

I still do Darcy Farrow on guitar, but I do 2:10 train on the banjo. That's our advantage as banjo players, we can translate.

Steve was the first of the new singer songwriters to be signed by the more  traditional Vanguard Label

'67?  Really, that was just a few months ago.

Edited by - Helix on 02/25/2020 01:56:36

Feb 25, 2020 - 2:24:47 AM
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OM45GE

USA

94708 posts since 11/7/2007

Nice playing Chuck

Feb 25, 2020 - 3:59:19 AM
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janolov

Sweden

40241 posts since 3/7/2006

I associate the tune with John Denver sometime during the 1970's, but I may have mixed it up

Feb 25, 2020 - 4:36:05 AM
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53887 posts since 12/14/2005

Asbestos I can recrawl, it was Ian & Sylvia.

Feb 25, 2020 - 8:15:24 AM
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chuckv97

Canada

47624 posts since 10/5/2013
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It was on this album that I darn near wore out
youtu.be/6frNpOx5M6A

Feb 25, 2020 - 8:20:04 AM

chuckv97

Canada

47624 posts since 10/5/2013
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John Denver did a great job on it too ,,,,(Pete Huttlinger on mandolin)
youtu.be/Itfg1DDAFmo


 

Feb 25, 2020 - 9:27:03 AM
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RB3

USA

624 posts since 4/12/2004

By this guy on one of his vinyl albums.

Darcy Farrow

Feb 25, 2020 - 12:44:15 PM
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dbrooks

USA

3747 posts since 3/11/2004

I loved that album as well. "Darcy Farrow" was a pretty popular song in our circle in Louisville during the 60's.

David

Feb 26, 2020 - 4:50:53 AM
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69 posts since 10/26/2018

Bluegrass Cardinals in full bluegrass harmony, early nineties.

Feb 26, 2020 - 7:42:52 AM
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1599 posts since 2/10/2013

Ian and Sylvia singing on the radio. Big name Canadian duo for a while. That was quite a while ago and the first time I heard the tune,

Feb 26, 2020 - 1:14:23 PM
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Paul R

Canada

12426 posts since 1/28/2010

On a John Denver album. I like what Garnet Rogers says, something like, "We disliked John Denver on principle."

Feb 26, 2020 - 2:22:26 PM
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2446 posts since 4/16/2003

My first recollection of hearing it was from the Bluegrass Cardinals, must have been sometime in the 1970's...

Feb 26, 2020 - 2:50:07 PM

chuckv97

Canada

47624 posts since 10/5/2013
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quote:
Originally posted by Paul R

On a John Denver album. I like what Garnet Rogers says, something like, "We disliked John Denver on principle."


Yeah,, those darn folkies who ended up making a lot of money just weren't "true" folkies anymore.....

Feb 26, 2020 - 3:44:58 PM

chuckv97

Canada

47624 posts since 10/5/2013
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To add one more to the list,,, from the “Scene”s latest album....Wonderful !
youtu.be/iVfNHDVgDY0


 

Feb 26, 2020 - 3:58:01 PM
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jwold

USA

1176 posts since 7/21/2004

I heard Chesapeake's version first. Their first album was excellent!

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lp3MKoQ-SaU

Edited by - jwold on 02/26/2020 15:58:18

Feb 26, 2020 - 4:49:46 PM
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Bill Rogers (Moderator)

USA

23215 posts since 6/25/2005
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Maybe from Tim O’Brien with Hot Rize. I have never listened to singer-songwriters and their folky stuff very much.

Feb 26, 2020 - 8:32:13 PM
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Paul R

Canada

12426 posts since 1/28/2010

"If you know who wrote it, it's not a folk song," and other pearls of wisdom from Michael Cooney. http://www.michaelcooney.com/whatsfolk.html

Feb 26, 2020 - 8:41:11 PM
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chuckv97

Canada

47624 posts since 10/5/2013
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I have to disagree with the esteemed Michael Cooney ,,,
“Most of today’s "singer-songwriters" are writing stuff that’s indistinguishable from pop music. Those who become popular, in the commercial sense, usually do become pop singers. So I think that almost all of what the industry calls "folk music" these days is really just low-budget pop music. If those low-budget pop/"folk" singers could afford it, they’d have elaborate backups and music videos, etc.

So why are all these new songs called folk songs? I think it’s because there isn’t another nice-sounding phrase to describe them. Calling ‘em "folk" songs gives them an undeserved stamp of pre-approval. Please, please, someone come up with a pretty phrase to replace "folk songs" for these singer-songwriters.

A folk song is a song that has evolved through the oral process. Someone may have written a song to start, but that wasn’t really a folk song; it is the cumulative
effect of all the changes on the song as it travels from person to person that make it a "folk" song. (Or a "traditional" song, as some say, in attempt to get away from the confusion; but, alas, I have heard people say they just wrote a traditional song.)”

I don't think he's meaning to be condescending (although it sounds like it), however, calling them pop/"folk" singers, and saying they'd have elaborate backup and music videos if they could afford it is smearing a lot of good songwriters who , in my estimation, are true craftsmen.  Also he says a song that has evolved through the oral process may have been written by someone at the start.  Well, the singer/songwriter songs of today fall into that same scenario.  Will "Some Day Soon", "Last Thing on My Mind", "Early Morning Rain", "Darcy Farrow", etc. be kicked to the curb in 50 to 100 yrears by traditional music players because they were written by so-called "pop/folk" singers?  Or will they have undergone the same folk process that Mr. Cooney espouses to be the trait of an authentic folk song? 

Edited by - chuckv97 on 02/26/2020 20:52:09

Feb 26, 2020 - 9:17:29 PM

3902 posts since 10/18/2007
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I first heard Darcy Farrow around 1971 from a friend who sang it played it on the guitar. One reason I liked the song was that it mentioned places in eastern California and western Nevada that I knew.

Feb 26, 2020 - 9:21:55 PM

chuckv97

Canada

47624 posts since 10/5/2013
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When I first went through that part of the country and saw the signs for Yerrington, Virginia City, Truckee River, Walker Valley, Carson City, etc. I finally realized the song story took place there. In all the years I’d listened to it it never occurred to me to look up those names for their locations - actually I thought they were fictional.  Funny thing was, I saw this map weekly on TV, but never connected it to the song.


 

Edited by - chuckv97 on 02/26/2020 21:35:36

Feb 26, 2020 - 10:02:17 PM
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Paul R

Canada

12426 posts since 1/28/2010

In response to your post, Chuck: Two years in a row we've played the Homegrown Live Festival, which has venues all over town, each for a different musical genre (the best one I've seen is the blues venue at the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery Club). We played at the "folk" venue. Well, it doesn't sound like "folk", it sounds like "singer-songwriter", a "genre" that has its own venue elsewhere downtown. It seemed as though maybe three out of all the acts could in any way be genuinely classified as "folk".

So this year I applied again, but changed the desired location to "country". It would seem to be a more appropriate place, given the type of performer at the "folk" location. There seems to have been a disconnect somewhere, in that playing an acoustic instrument allows you to call yourself a "folk" musician, when your goal is success in the music industry and fame as a songwriter.

We don't have to agree with Michael Cooney an all his points, but I do think he gives us lots to consider.

Feb 27, 2020 - 12:39:55 PM

1256 posts since 11/15/2010

"Darcy Farrow" is a fascinating song because it really does sound like an old traditional song. When commercial folk music was popular in the late '50s and early '60s, there were quite a few songwriters trying to write original material that sounded like old traditional songs, but "Darcy Farrow" is one of the best of the lot. Back then, a songwriter could earn a lot of money if a popular folk act recorded one of his/her "traditional" songs that was written the day before yesterday.

The debate on what is folk music has been going on forever, and it's likely to never be resolved.  To the folklorist, it will probably always mean something different than it does to the casual listener.  Also, a lot of the time, one's definition of folk music is used only to exclude a song or genre (i.e., "You can't call that stuff folk music"). Maybe "acoustic" or "Americana" are more promising terms for songs that aren't traditional. Personally, if I like a song, I like it, and I don't particularly care what someone else calls it. 

Edited by - Joe Connor on 02/27/2020 12:40:45

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