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Feb 24, 2020 - 5:26 PM
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1185 posts since 2/2/2008

What has happened to the art of communication, texting, emails, sales adverts, letter writing etc.

Far too often I am second guessing what people are saying.
Many times there is no punctuation or short responses, which could be taken as angry or aggressive.

So many people selling things with no explanation of details such as sizes, damaged, missing parts etc.

The way people word things in text does not make sense so I am left guessing have they made an error or predictive text changed their words and they haven't proof read.

I get very frustrated when trying to buy things via text.
Sometimes I just abandoned the conversation and look to buy elsewhere and sometimes I explain to the person that they are unclear and not coming forward with detailed explanations. That makes them angry, but sometimes I feel they need to be told.

Old time letter writing was an art and I miss that in our modern life.

Am I alone here?

Edited after valid input from first comment.

Edited by - 5strings3picks1banjo on 02/24/2020 18:13:01

Feb 24, 2020 - 5:48:20 PM
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1517 posts since 11/17/2018

quote:
Originally posted by 5strings3picks1banjo

What has happened to the art of communication, texting, emails, sales adverts, letter writing etc.
Far too often I am second guessing what people are saying.
Many times there is no punctuation or short responses, which could be taken as angry or aggressive.
So many people selling things with no explanation of details such as sizes, damaged, missing parts etc.
The way people word things in text does not make sense so I am left guessing have they made an error or predictive text changed their words and they haven't proof read.
I get very frustrated when trying to buy things via text.
Sometimes I just abandoned the conversation and look to buy elsewhere and sometimes I explain to the person that they are unclear and not coming forward with detailed explanations. That makes them angry, but sometimes I feel they need to be told.

Old time letter writing was an art and I miss that in our modern life.

Am I alone here?


Using paragraphs instead of a "wall of text" is helpful for the reader.

Feb 24, 2020 - 6:02:26 PM

1185 posts since 2/2/2008

quote:
Originally posted by OldNavyGuy
quote:
Originally posted by 5strings3picks1banjo

What has happened to the art of communication, texting, emails, sales adverts, letter writing etc.
Far too often I am second guessing what people are saying.
Many times there is no punctuation or short responses, which could be taken as angry or aggressive.
So many people selling things with no explanation of details such as sizes, damaged, missing parts etc.
The way people word things in text does not make sense so I am left guessing have they made an error or predictive text changed their words and they haven't proof read.
I get very frustrated when trying to buy things via text.
Sometimes I just abandoned the conversation and look to buy elsewhere and sometimes I explain to the person that they are unclear and not coming forward with detailed explanations. That makes them angry, but sometimes I feel they need to be told.

Old time letter writing was an art and I miss that in our modern life.

Am I alone here?


Using paragraphs instead of a "wall of text" is helpful for the reader.

 


Ok I will take that. :) 

I was rushing in my lunchtime.

See how easy it is to be frustrating for someone who has to read the comment.

Feb 24, 2020 - 6:03:18 PM
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1185 posts since 2/2/2008

Not saying I have the art, but I try.

Feb 24, 2020 - 6:28:10 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

13428 posts since 9/27/2007

I used to write letters to friends & relatives. It's always nice to get one back. I used to write to a girl that had a typewriter that had a cursive setting. Hand typed handwriting! 

Feb 24, 2020 - 6:32:58 PM
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chuckv97

Canada

47737 posts since 10/5/2013
Online Now

Way before internet and texting we read poems in Mrs. Lindsay’s Grade 12 English class that I absolutely had no clue what they were about. And then, of course, we have Jack Kerouac....

Feb 24, 2020 - 7:39:02 PM
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53939 posts since 12/14/2005

You are not alone.
I appreciate a well composed message, and try to compose mine as best I can.

But I am old, and you and I may be remnants of a vanishing species.

Feb 24, 2020 - 9:02:54 PM

Paul R

Canada

12438 posts since 1/28/2010

I have a couple of boxes of correspondence from back in the day. It's pretty much a lost art. There are similarities with e-mail, but lots of people can't even write cursive these days.

Feb 24, 2020 - 9:07:41 PM

chuckv97

Canada

47737 posts since 10/5/2013
Online Now

...if you put 100 typewriters in front of 100 monkeys,,,, sooner or later one of’em will write a best seller.

Feb 25, 2020 - 12:26:28 AM
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Mooooo

USA

7614 posts since 8/20/2016

Omg, idk, lol.

Feb 25, 2020 - 1:02:37 AM
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9290 posts since 8/22/2006

quote:
Originally posted by chuckv97

...if you put 100 typewriters in front of 100 monkeys,,,, sooner or later one of’em will write a best seller.


Don’t mean to be a smart ass but the picture is of a great ape  (orangutan)  which have no tails. But the great ape ( gorillas,chimpanzees, orangutans)would probably type out a novel before any monkey. 

Feb 25, 2020 - 2:30:47 AM
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3215 posts since 7/8/2010

I feel very privileged to have learned to write in the cursive style of handwriting. Many a letter I have written and received, mostly while in the Navy and deployed overseas. The visual sensation I would get while reading and writing these letters was so heart warming. I miss it.

Feb 25, 2020 - 2:36:12 AM
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Players Union Member

Helix

USA

12362 posts since 8/30/2006

It would be better to put 100 banjos, because monkeys would eat the ribbon and pee on the paper. A novel by a monkey would start with a picture of a banana. A monkey with a banjo sometimes appears here with a fake arrow through his head. Binobos jam.

Feb 25, 2020 - 3:38:24 AM

m06

England

8416 posts since 10/5/2006
Online Now

The ability to communicate is fundamental to being human.

Anything that causes miscommunication or distorted or no communication is a problem in the making.

We have to be able to understand each other and reality and meaning to be able to function appropriately in society and form and maintain healthy relationships. Whether that relationship is with a customer or a loved one. Good communication is the foundation of trust and understanding.

Edited by - m06 on 02/25/2020 03:41:40

Feb 25, 2020 - 4:49:51 AM

Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

23966 posts since 8/3/2003

I refuse to text. If my kids ... or anyone else.... wants to communicate by phone, they can dial, wait for me to answer and talk to me or e-mail me.

As far as letter writing, with e-mail, people seldom actually write a letter any more. I know I don't. If I did try to compose and write a letter, my handwriting would be so bad as to be almost illegible. I wouldn't ask anyone to try to decipher that!

Thank you notes are almost extinct now. I still have a few friends who actually send them out when receiving a present, but I think thanking someone in person is enough and really, better.

Just my 2 cents worth.

Feb 25, 2020 - 6:50:44 AM

71277 posts since 5/9/2007

Coherent writing and a more complete understanding of the english language used to be more focused in school,imo.

We've also stopped using slide rules,long division and cash.

Edited by - steve davis on 02/25/2020 06:54:04

Feb 25, 2020 - 9:43:43 AM
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1076 posts since 8/7/2017

Steve, you can send me any of your unused cash, I'll put it to good use :-)

I loved slide rules, the only topic in math class (9th grade) where I excelled. Not a fan of arithmetic, I confess I use my calculator. Slide rules were still taught when I got my pilot's license (E6B, a circular slide rule with extra scales for flyers)...but now electronic devices are allowed in the license tests.

Betty Edwards' "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain" book has useful tips to improve handwriting...but only in the editions up through 1999. Later editions were dumbed-down for School Boards who wished to hide the fact they no longer taught cursive, Bah. You can find used, pre-2000 editions via Amazon.

There is a good book, for some (like me) that helps with writing clearly: Writing the Natural Way, by G.L.Rico.

My best trick is to use BHO's Preview before posting - I know what I wanted to say, but Preview often shows where I fell short, so I can correct before posting.

Feb 25, 2020 - 10:39:26 AM

m06

England

8416 posts since 10/5/2006
Online Now

Economics is the most common driver of mass changes in behaviour.

Emails including attachments (photos, documents etc) cost nothing; we simply type and press send. For a letter a UK first class postage stamp costs 70p and second class stamp 61p. Plus the cost of writing paper and envelope and the time and effort to get the letter in the mailbox.

Is a handwritten letter more intimate? Yes.

Edited by - m06 on 02/25/2020 10:45:01

Feb 25, 2020 - 1:17:32 PM
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9378 posts since 2/22/2007

Economics shows us what we truly value, as opposed to what we say that we value or like to think that we value. Perhaps that is why it is called the dismal science?

And a million monkeys with typewriters will never, ever turn out a best seller and especially not the "complete works of Shakespeare". Never.

Feb 25, 2020 - 2:41:23 PM

Owen

Canada

5178 posts since 6/5/2011

Dunno, Bill. This site says it's a done deal ... Oct.6, 2011: https://rss.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/j.1740-9713.2011.00533.x

Feb 25, 2020 - 5:44:20 PM
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Paul R

Canada

12438 posts since 1/28/2010

quote:
Originally posted by Mooooo

Omg, idk, lol.


iyho

Feb 25, 2020 - 6:05:24 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

13428 posts since 9/27/2007

When I was a kid a friend had a list of movie stars addresses.  You could write a letter to your favorites telling them you were a fan & they would send back an autographed picture. 

I had one from Don Knots & Red Skelton among others. 

My younger brother sent off for a Free Joe Weider body building course when he was 6 or 7 & my parents & grandpa thought it was funny when he got regular mail for years addressed to Mr.His Name! 

Feb 25, 2020 - 8:46:36 PM
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Paul R

Canada

12438 posts since 1/28/2010

quote:
Originally posted by bubbalouie

When I was a kid a friend had a list of movie stars addresses.  You could write a letter to your favorites telling them you were a fan & they would send back an autographed picture. 

I had one from Don Knots & Red Skelton among others. 

My younger brother sent off for a Free Joe Weider body building course when he was 6 or 7 & my parents & grandpa thought it was funny when he got regular mail for years addressed to Mr.His Name! 


A friend had a cat named Boola Virgin Mary. He sent off to some evangelist in the cat's name, abbreviated. So the cat kept getting mail addressed to "Mr. B.V. Mary". (This friend worked for the assessment department of the Ontario government at the time, and later became a lawyer.)

Feb 26, 2020 - 9:49:13 AM
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Owen

Canada

5178 posts since 6/5/2011

Feb 26, 2020 - 11:35:40 AM

Paul R

Canada

12438 posts since 1/28/2010

It was in 1971. I couch surfed at his apartment while I found a new place to "live". (I moved into Rochdale*, where I "lived" while going to teacher's college.)

* if you don't already know, look it up. It was "something completely different". "Unique" can't cover it.

Feb 27, 2020 - 1:44:13 AM

m06

England

8416 posts since 10/5/2006
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by banjo bill-e

>Economics shows us what we truly value, as opposed to what we say that we value or like to think that we value. Perhaps that is why it is called the dismal science?<
 


One way that economic influence drives change is via cost. But to make economics ‘neutral’ is to fail to acknowledge it’s dominant critical effect on choice.

In a modern industrial economy changes in behaviour are not necessarily indicators of an individual person’s core values. More likely they are an indicator of that person’s financial consideration i.e. their ability to afford to continue to behave as they would wish.

As an obvious example many people would prefer to support small local stores and a sense of community and derive a wider human social sense of intimacy and belonging. In this basic scenario we can immediately discern two factors at work:

a) a person’s spending power; their household budget and scope to afford.

b) the effect of scale and competition (facilitated by technology) forcing small businesses to raise prices to survive or specific behaviours e.g. handwritten mail, to become a costly option.

These two basic factors alone (the full picture is more complex) act to drive a wedge between our individual values and our ability to behave in accord with our values. Often to the silent detriment of our health and happiness.

The lower cost option is created by businesses usurping other choices through economic leverage of scale and volume; and thereby making previous more intimate choices more expensive by comparison. The apparent simplistic financial ‘gain’ - cheaper goods and services - is a form of commercial manipulation, that process is blindly driven by the unending capitalist economic imperative to generate ever larger profit completely ignoring non-economic factors (values) that contribute to well-being and happiness.

Edited by - m06 on 02/27/2020 01:59:37

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