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Feb 21, 2020 - 5:14:45 PM

mander

USA

4207 posts since 10/7/2007

I was a non-reader until I was in my 30s.
I normal fall asleep to some murder mystery program but Monday, our DVD player died. To aid my slumber, I went down and claimed our son's comic book collection and I have been reading under the covers with the aid of a flash light all week. Hubby replaced the DVD player, but who cares! I finally know why all my friends loved reading under the covers! It's a blast. I highly recommend it.

What were/are your favorite under the covers reads?

Feb 21, 2020 - 5:18:41 PM
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DRH

USA

303 posts since 5/29/2018
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Most men, having started out as boys, would probably rather not discuss it.

Feb 21, 2020 - 6:07:18 PM
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donc

Canada

6200 posts since 2/9/2010

I went to bed last night with the ultimate in men's fantasy magazines. It was the Consumer Reports annual new car edition.

Edited by - donc on 02/21/2020 18:08:43

Feb 21, 2020 - 6:45:16 PM
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Paul R

Canada

12425 posts since 1/28/2010

It wasn't under the cover reading in the Fifties, it was listening to my tiny transistor radio with the single earpiece. I still have it, but everything's on FM radio today.

Feb 21, 2020 - 6:54:53 PM
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1264 posts since 4/22/2018

Started out with Razzle, these days it’s the screwfix catalogue

Feb 22, 2020 - 1:59:26 AM
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m06

England

8384 posts since 10/5/2006

I’ve never read in bed; either as a kid or now. My reading time is the quiet of early morning, washed and dressed and feet up on the sofa. Cup of tea or coffee within arms reach. There is where I’m in receptive reading mode and it gets me into the day. Cosy and secure from the rain and wind beating against the windows. Or if limpid early morning sunlight is streaming in, as it is this morning, so much the better.

My current reading (and has been for a while)  is 17th century Quaker texts downloaded as PDF’s from the Early English Books website. I print these out at 2 pages per A4 sheet, fold and tear them in half, and staple into book form. Just the beautiful typography takes me to a special place. That research, retrieval and ‘binding’ ritual has become part of my early morning reading experience. I find it privately very contemplative and connecting.

The convention of 17th century typographers was to set the first word of the next page justified on a separate line at the foot of the right hand page. That word then duplicates as we turn the page 

                                                                                                                                                                  creating  

                      

Edited by - m06 on 02/22/2020 02:20:16

Feb 22, 2020 - 2:10:51 AM
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9289 posts since 8/22/2006
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Mander mander mander if someone were to say oh I don’t know maybe,Playboy folks would probably say..... eeeew what a pervert. Or let say popular science the common response would probably be....Geek or Nerd. Or say maybe some outdoor type of magazine like field and stream or bass masters the response might be...he’s a manly man. So I’m going to refrain from answering the question. Nothing Like a good Mystery right? Cough cough Dan Brown novels cough cough.....

Feb 22, 2020 - 2:22:43 AM

m06

England

8384 posts since 10/5/2006

creating a seamless transition of thought as we turn the pages. I love that tiny, now lost attention to reading sense and detail, probably more than I should admit to.

Early Quaker books are laid out in chapters. If the book I’m reading is a longer text I’ll print out and staple in daily reading stages, maybe two or three chapters per day. I’ve come to know how many pages my stapler can bind in one go.

Edited by - m06 on 02/22/2020 02:33:11

Feb 22, 2020 - 7:53:34 AM
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Brian T

Canada

16262 posts since 6/5/2008

Back in the early 1960's, Richard Prather was writing murder-mystery detective novels about a private eye name Shell Scott. I must have bought and read 30+ of them.
Homer's Odessey and The Iliad got read a few times, too.
Have you ever read Darwin's Origin Of Species, cover-to-cover? You should.

Some modern popular authors these days, people like Michael Pollan (on foodie things).
Otherwise, a lot of reference books on the artists of art and carvings in the First Nations of the Pacific Northwest.

Feb 22, 2020 - 11:27:15 AM

Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

23925 posts since 8/3/2003

I don't ever remember reading under the covers any time in my life. I remember as a growing child reading at night and if I got interested in a book, I might read util the wee hours of the morning. Now, I read a good book after I turn in for the night. Usually just 20 to 30 minutes to relax and get sleepy.

I prefer murder mysteries, who-dun-its, that sort of thing. No romance novels for me.

Feb 22, 2020 - 11:40:36 AM
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chuckv97

Canada

47595 posts since 10/5/2013
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I read mildly boring books so’s I can doze off quicker

Feb 22, 2020 - 12:11:41 PM
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71247 posts since 5/9/2007

Aside from not reading under the covers and the choice of the clarity of 60 watts from a reading lamp my reading consists mostly of a very small list of sci-fi as from Kurt Vonnegut,Robert Heinlein,Frank Herbert or Arthur C. Clark.
I'm a bit out of touch with new writers of this genre.

Feb 22, 2020 - 1:42:08 PM
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DC5

USA

9911 posts since 6/30/2015
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quote:
Originally posted by Paul R

It wasn't under the cover reading in the Fifties, it was listening to my tiny transistor radio with the single earpiece. I still have it, but everything's on FM radio today.


Crystal set for me.  Could only get 2 stations, but they were both good.

Feb 22, 2020 - 1:58:05 PM
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chuckv97

Canada

47595 posts since 10/5/2013
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by DC5
quote:
Originally posted by Paul R

It wasn't under the cover reading in the Fifties, it was listening to my tiny transistor radio with the single earpiece. I still have it, but everything's on FM radio today.


Crystal set for me.  Could only get 2 stations, but they were both good.


Leather-cased  Panasonic transistor radio for me : CHUM Toronto,, CKOC Hamilton,, or WKBW Buffalo

...the only banjo I heard was the MTA, Battle of New Orleans, and Washington Square (a tune I still like and might arrange for Scruggs style banjo one of these days)

https://youtu.be/tUAwqhnqSAc

Edited by - chuckv97 on 02/22/2020 14:08:49

Feb 22, 2020 - 1:58:38 PM

14605 posts since 12/2/2005

Anthologies are great, because one can comfortably read a story before dropping off.

Two of my favorites: Up In The Old Hotel, which is collection of the stories Joseph Mitchell wrote for the New Yorker, and Secret Ingredients, which is an anthology of food writing that appeared in the New Yorker pretty much since it started.

Stuff published in the New Yorker is always fabulously written.

Feb 22, 2020 - 2:05:32 PM
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DC5

USA

9911 posts since 6/30/2015
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quote:
Originally posted by chuckv97
quote:
Originally posted by DC5
quote:
Originally posted by Paul R

It wasn't under the cover reading in the Fifties, it was listening to my tiny transistor radio with the single earpiece. I still have it, but everything's on FM radio today.


Crystal set for me.  Could only get 2 stations, but they were both good.


Leather-cased  Panasonic transistor radio for me : CHUM Toronto,, CKOC Hamilton,, or WKBW Buffalo


Had an old short wave set and would sometimes tune in to CHU Canada, which only gave the time every minute, but it would alternate between French and English each minute.

Feb 22, 2020 - 2:14:34 PM

chuckv97

Canada

47595 posts since 10/5/2013
Online Now

Sometimes I read one of O. Henry’s stories,,got some of his stuff free from Project Gutenberg

Edited by - chuckv97 on 02/22/2020 14:15:51

Feb 22, 2020 - 2:30:01 PM
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Paul R

Canada

12425 posts since 1/28/2010

quote:
Originally posted by DC5
quote:
Originally posted by chuckv97
quote:
Originally posted by DC5
quote:
Originally posted by Paul R

It wasn't under the cover reading in the Fifties, it was listening to my tiny transistor radio with the single earpiece. I still have it, but everything's on FM radio today.


Crystal set for me.  Could only get 2 stations, but they were both good.


Leather-cased  Panasonic transistor radio for me : CHUM Toronto,, CKOC Hamilton,, or WKBW Buffalo


Had an old short wave set and would sometimes tune in to CHU Canada, which only gave the time every minute, but it would alternate between French and English each minute.


When I was in university and beginning to listen to rock in '66, I could get WKBW in Montreal at night. Not only did they play songs before they hit Canadian airwaves, they played The Adventures of Chicken Man!

Feb 22, 2020 - 2:51:11 PM
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chuckv97

Canada

47595 posts since 10/5/2013
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Edited by - chuckv97 on 02/22/2020 14:54:42

Feb 22, 2020 - 3:36:30 PM

mander

USA

4207 posts since 10/7/2007

quote:
Originally posted by 5B-Ranch

Mander mander mander if someone were to say oh I don’t know maybe,Playboy folks would probably say..... eeeew what a pervert. Or let say popular science the common response would probably be....Geek or Nerd. Or say maybe some outdoor type of magazine like field and stream or bass masters the response might be...he’s a manly man. So I’m going to refrain from answering the question. Nothing Like a good Mystery right? Cough cough Dan Brown novels cough cough.....


I can top that. I was reading "Rick and Morty" comic books! :-)

Feb 23, 2020 - 6:15:51 AM
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Players Union Member

DC5

USA

9911 posts since 6/30/2015
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quote:
Originally posted by Paul R
quote:
Originally posted by DC5
quote:
Originally posted by chuckv97
quote:
Originally posted by DC5
quote:
Originally posted by Paul R

It wasn't under the cover reading in the Fifties, it was listening to my tiny transistor radio with the single earpiece. I still have it, but everything's on FM radio today.


Crystal set for me.  Could only get 2 stations, but they were both good.


Leather-cased  Panasonic transistor radio for me : CHUM Toronto,, CKOC Hamilton,, or WKBW Buffalo


Had an old short wave set and would sometimes tune in to CHU Canada, which only gave the time every minute, but it would alternate between French and English each minute.


When I was in university and beginning to listen to rock in '66, I could get WKBW in Montreal at night. Not only did they play songs before they hit Canadian airwaves, they played The Adventures of Chicken Man!


I remember picking up WKBW at night in Massachusetts.  Jackson Armstrong was their night time DJ and I swear he had the fastest mouth in the world, but you could understand every word.  The ran ads for the 24 hour McDonalds out by the airport.  Back in the late 60's there weren't too many 24 hour anythings.  In fact most AM radio stations either powered down at sunset, or went off the air altogether.  I could get WKBW from Buffalo at night, but not local Worcester stations only 12 miles away. 

Feb 23, 2020 - 8:42:31 AM
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bubbalouie

Canada

13403 posts since 9/27/2007
Online Now

I too had a crystal radio I built from Radio Shack. Living so close to the U.S. I got channels with every turn of the dial.

My Grandpa used to take me to the local Kingston aces games & I would listen to the games we didn't see.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingston_Aces

I took the head set apart & put the earpiece in my pillowcase. My great Uncle that lived in the house had boxes of radio parts in the attic. I asked my Grandpa if I could have a roll of thin copper wire I found.

I threw that up over a tree in my backyard & got amazing reception. I picked up Florida one night. 

I read a lot as a kid but not under the covers.

Feb 23, 2020 - 9:16:58 AM

3186 posts since 7/8/2010

Gotta love the Jack Reacher series. Very action packed and descriptive. Local library has seven or eight books. Jack picks up where 007 left off. Wait, is there a song in there?

Feb 23, 2020 - 2:06:16 PM

Paul R

Canada

12425 posts since 1/28/2010

Dad gave me a short wave radio for Christmas when I was in high school. I had an old (WWII?) headset that plugged right in. Before I used it to get WKBW, I'd get Radio Moscow, Radio Havana Cuba, The Voice of the West (Portugal) and other propaganda gems.

Yeah, no 24 hours. The CBC television would go off the air and we'd get O Canada and then nothing. Nothing like the national anthem to let you know that it was being followed by empty space.

Feb 23, 2020 - 2:46:12 PM

1475 posts since 11/17/2018

quote:
Originally posted by chuckv97

Sometimes I read one of O. Henry’s stories,,got some of his stuff free from Project Gutenberg


"The Last Leaf" is awesome.

Feb 23, 2020 - 4:02:02 PM

chuckv97

Canada

47595 posts since 10/5/2013
Online Now

quote:
Originally posted by OldNavyGuy
quote:
Originally posted by chuckv97

Sometimes I read one of O. Henry’s stories,,got some of his stuff free from Project Gutenberg


"The Last Leaf" is awesome.

thnx,, I just downloaded it,,didn't have that one yet.


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