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Feb 16, 2020 - 2:36:14 PM
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mander

USA

4207 posts since 10/7/2007

That was a phrase that used to make me snicker, when I was a kid. But the truth is, some things were better when we were kids.

Today's example is plumbing.

When I was a kid, my Dad insisted only women should be allowed to be plumbers. He stated his reasoning in indisputable facts. Indisputable fact # 1: Men are want to be Gorillas. They over tighten everything. No woman should have to call a man just to loosen a screw. A waste of both people's time. Indisputable fact # 2: The female gluteus maximus is infinity more pleasurable to stare at when exposed, than the male of the species. Do not argue with my father, he is always right.

I grew up believing, clearing clogged drains was woman's work. I've been in charge of it all my adult life. 99.99 % of clogs can be fixed by cleaning out the u-bend. Until, some idiot had to go improve things.

When I was a kid, the plug sat on top of the lever and could be easily removed. Now, the plug is locked into the lever. Now clogs happen around the bottom of the plug instead of in the u-bend. Okay, fine... except.... some gorilla assembled the whole thing and after 30 minutes, I called Hubby. Even Hubby couldn't loosen the assemble. A five minute job took us both over an hour to clear out. I tell you, clearing a drain was easier when I was a kid.

How about you? What was better when you were a kid?

Feb 16, 2020 - 2:51:05 PM

1056 posts since 12/2/2013

Answering your question Mander would make a a NYT best selling book, but I suggest you read the late David Halberstam's history, "The Fifties." Hard to believe today how "safe" the world could be (Oh I know, it all depended on where you lived; pretty good for white Irish kids in greater Boston, less so for blacks and people of color in dense urban areas or the rural deep south).

Feb 16, 2020 - 3:07:51 PM
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1289 posts since 7/14/2004

Summers were far better as a kid. They seemed endless. 3 whole, carefree months with no school work. As an adult, the all to short summers North of 62 degrees Lat fly by much too fast.

Feb 16, 2020 - 3:19:49 PM
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Texasbanjo (Moderator)

USA

23925 posts since 8/3/2003

Life was gentler, simpler, kinder. We never had to lock the doors to our house or car because no one would ever think of bothering someone else's property.

We kids ran everywhere in the neighborhood we wanted to go. We didn't worry about pedophiles or muggers or people with guns.

I remember taking an old rifle to school for show and tell. Try that now and you're arrested.

I remember waiting on the bus to take me into town where I could eat a hamburger, drink a Coke, go to a movie and come back home.... all on a dollar..... and have change left.

Yes, those were the good old days!!

Feb 16, 2020 - 3:52:21 PM
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Brian T

Canada

16262 posts since 6/5/2008

Unsupervised outdoor playtime in the summers.

We lived almost exactly 2 blocks from the edge of the city.
Mom packed food and drink for each of us and we were sent on our way on our bikes.
Uncultivated pasture land with a wetland with ducks and deer.
One patch of scrawny aspens for shade.
Tall grass that you could hide in just by lying down.

We were the explorers of the universe. The cow bones might have been buffalo bones.

Feb 16, 2020 - 4:01:42 PM
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Mooooo

USA

7587 posts since 8/20/2016

When I was a kid, after school and before bed, we were outside most of the time, even most days in the winter. There were no video games and we wouldn't be caught dead watching daytime tv.

Edited by - Mooooo on 02/16/2020 16:03:38

Feb 16, 2020 - 4:19:26 PM
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chuckv97

Canada

47595 posts since 10/5/2013
Online Now

A corollary on the overly sweet nostalgic reminiscences. Our 4 th grade teacher, Mrs. Taylor, was a smoker,,even lit up in class for the odd puff, then put it out. One day she was out of cigarettes and sent me to the corner variety to pick up a pack of Daily Mail (aka, Daily “Stale”).
Our neighbo(u)rhood consisted of Krauts, Wops, Polacks, Limeys and Dike-Hoppers - some being Roman Catholic, the other Protestants or back-sliding Evangelicals. Kenny Regher was the local bully who kicked me off my bicycle and stole my new handle grips with those cool streamers. Next day my older brother and I tore after him as he whipped by, streamers fluttering in the wind. A torn shirt and a bloody nose later I had my handle grips back.
Our tv antenna gave us a snowy picture from channel 6 ,Toronto across the lake. We couldn’t even see the puck when Tim Horton raced back into his end on a dump-and-chase by the hapless Rangers.
And that’s just part of the misery I grew up in back in the ‘nifty’ fifties.
Ya,, the good old days,,,,,

Feb 16, 2020 - 4:59:18 PM
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RonR

USA

1606 posts since 11/29/2012

We had it made. We played and fished in the woods and creeks all day long.We had home made forts, slingshots, bows and arrows.In the winter it was sledding and ice skating in the canals and at the lake. When I was a teen ager I had to learn all the plumbing on two houses and my uncles beach cottage.Dad said plumbing was easy,just remember water runs downhill. It was not easy.

Feb 16, 2020 - 6:42:52 PM
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DRH

USA

303 posts since 5/29/2018

Mander, since you live in Portland you are probably familiar with Powell Butte. We lived at the base of that volcano at the 150th block, south of Powel Blvd. I spent much of my youth up there and camped frequently on the pasture.

There was an old motorcycle hill climb behind our house. The developers fell a large fir tree about a third of the way up to keep the motorcycles out.

The woods were full of old tires. Tires roll downhill quite well. We acquired some lumber from the new houses being built and I constructed a ramp on the downed fir tree. A large tire released from the top of the trail and subsequently launched from the ramp went over the top of our house, bounced in the street, and disappeared over the house across the street. I estimate the velocity of the tires when they hit the street to be at least 50 miles an hour.

I don't know how many tires we launched that week, but some of them made it all the way to Powell Blvd half a mile away. There was at least one report of a car on Powell being hit by a flying tire. (Honest, officer, it came out of nowhere.) How many of them took out fences, house siding, parked or passing cars we never knew. Somebody took the ramp down so I suspect we were on the watch list that summer.

We had many adventures on that hill. I'm not sure how the statute of limitations applies to being a kid so I won't expand on those adventures.

Powell Butte is now a nature park. The trail heads, like most of portland, are now overrun with tent vagrants. I planned to walk the area when I was there in 2016. Locals advised me against it unless I was armed. What a bummer.

Feb 16, 2020 - 7:16:34 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

13403 posts since 9/27/2007
Online Now

My brother & I would groan whenever dad would start a sentence with 'When I was a kid" Blah blah uphill both ways blah blah.

We spent our summer holidays fishing, swimming & camping on the back lakes of Southern Ontario. It was a bicycle ride to lake Ontario & lots of local rivers. It was hot & humid In the city, My grandpa & some of our friends had affordable rustic cottages with a well & out houses on small lakes full of fish. Back then I considered myself an aquatic mammal. 

I was in a Scout troop where I could go camping all year round. Our leader was an arctic survivalist. 

We went to family reunions where there was lots of good food & the regular holidays too.

If we were stuck in town in the winter we could walk to a local hill to go sliding. 2 blocks from home they flooded a hockey rink & a figure 8 skating rink in Victoria park. We'd put guards on our skates & walk there instead of leaving our boots in the changing shack.

Yept! That was the life. 

Feb 16, 2020 - 7:27:23 PM
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chuckv97

Canada

47595 posts since 10/5/2013
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Car-bumper skiing,,,, Knick-knocky nine-doors,,, sneaking into the back of the drive-in movie,,,, jumping on the merry-go-round at Lakeside Park ,,getting chased off by Leo, the half-drunken attendant,,,, building rafts on 15 Mile Creek,,, going to the cherry orchards at night in June and gorging on sweet black cherries,,,,

Feb 16, 2020 - 8:15:49 PM
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bubbalouie

Canada

13403 posts since 9/27/2007
Online Now

Doug H. reminded me of a wheel flying through the air. We were partying on the second story balcony of the Animal House during a chinook in Calgary,  We were one block off of Edmonton trail uphill to the west .

Our street went up almost 40 degrees up from our corner. They used to put those saw horse style barricades with the flashing lights at the top of the shute. Every winter some guys would try it. 

We heard the scraping sound when they rubbed up against the side & a bang & a crash when they hit the level cross street in their pickup. All the stuff in the back flew out. A ladder, a bunch of junk & empties & we saw a tire on a rim well above our heads fly by & bounce a few times before it stogged in an aluminum screen door of an apartment down below! 

They got out laughing & gathered up their stuff & hit the trail!

Feb 16, 2020 - 10:28:33 PM
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Paul R

Canada

12425 posts since 1/28/2010

I walked to and from school, but sometimes took the old streetcars. Some had wicker seats. I took the streetcar to Cubs, at my school, in the evening. In the dead of a Montreal winter I would be waiting at the stop in my uniform shorts, freezing my knees.

Considering our ages, we were free to come and go quite young. I was in grade two and going some distance to school on my own. One time I got on the streetcar at the back of a crowd of adults. The driver didn't see me and shut the door. I had one foot trapped in the door and was hanging outside the streetcar. Fortunately some people yelled to him and he stopped. Someone - I never knew who - took me home.

One thing I was impressed with: My parents trusted me - trusted all of us. So we could venture out and go where we pleased. One exception - when I was out after dark on my bicycle. They grounded me for a week and I figured it was a just consequence.

When I outgrew my small bicycle, Dad got an army surplus one (CCM) and put it together. I never crashed on that bicycle. It was way too big. It was so far to the ground that I didn't dare crash. Fear kept me upright!

Feb 17, 2020 - 9:57:06 AM
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WesB

USA

221 posts since 12/17/2014

Looking back on what all we did as youngsters, it almost seems as if we were searching for some fool-proof method of retroactive birth control. We survived though, didn't we?

Due to all the limitations placed on them, the current crop of youngsters will never have that chance.

Feb 17, 2020 - 10:46:43 AM
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Owen

Canada

5133 posts since 6/5/2011

My mom, like a lot of rural people at that time/place was raised without much "frills,"  and then spent the early part of her adulthood in "The Great Depression."  Two of her later-in-life observations: 1) "Sometimes I wish I'd never heard the word 'save.' "  and 2) "The good old days!?!?! .. you can have 'em."

Edited by - Owen on 02/17/2020 10:47:39

Feb 17, 2020 - 2:51:20 PM
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m06

England

8384 posts since 10/5/2006

quote:
Originally posted by Owen

My mom, like a lot of rural people at that time/place was raised without much "frills,"  and then spent the early part of her adulthood in "The Great Depression."  Two of her later-in-life observations: 1) "Sometimes I wish I'd never heard the word 'save.' "  and 2) "The good old days!?!?! .. you can have 'em."


Exactly. Perspective is everything

My dad was born in a mining village in 1922. His dad was a coal miner. In winter 1926 during the General Strike he recalled scavenging for fragments of coal on slag heaps with his out-of-work dad to try and get enough fuel to put some heat into a cold house. His uncle was a miner too and died of pneumoconiosis - black lung - from the choking black coal dust. Growing up my dad couldn't wait to get away and seek an alternative  to a life spent down the pit. Fortunately he did get away. He would've smiled wryly if he heard anyone today use the phrase 'the good old days'. Followed by the phrase ' 'ee don't know 'ee's born' uttered quietly under his breath.

Edited by - m06 on 02/17/2020 14:54:32

Feb 17, 2020 - 3:07:56 PM

figmo59

USA

30364 posts since 3/5/2008

Let's face it...
We were all just younger..way back then..... ;0)

Feb 17, 2020 - 11:01:35 PM

Paul R

Canada

12425 posts since 1/28/2010

quote:
Originally posted by Owen

My mom, like a lot of rural people at that time/place was raised without much "frills,"  and then spent the early part of her adulthood in "The Great Depression."  Two of her later-in-life observations: 1) "Sometimes I wish I'd never heard the word 'save.' "  and 2) "The good old days!?!?! .. you can have 'em."


Depends upon your perspective. Dad grew up poor in the poorest part of Montreal, Pointe St-Charles and had to leave school to go to work at thirteen when his father died. Mom was the daughter of the director of the Montreal fire department. She once made the mistake of telling us that she used Grandfather's chauffeur to go shopping. We let her have it for that.

But Dad got by. He was proud that he owned a car during the Depression while some people wouldn't leave their houses for the shame of being unemployed..

Grandfather Carson lies under a huge tombstone on Mount Royal, Dad once took me to see his father's grave, in a different part of the same cemetery. It has a numbered stone the size of brick in the ground - a pauper's grave.

Mom and Dad lie with Grandfather Carson.

Feb 17, 2020 - 11:57:43 PM

m06

England

8384 posts since 10/5/2006

quote:
Originally posted by flyingsquirrelinlay

Answering your question Mander would make a a NYT best selling book, but I suggest you read the late David Halberstam's history, "The Fifties." Hard to believe today how "safe" the world could be (Oh I know, it all depended on where you lived; pretty good for white Irish kids in greater Boston, less so for blacks and people of color in dense urban areas or the rural deep south).


That's an interesting viewpoint.

Safer or naive? In the 1950's, and before, a heck of a lot of kids were subject to sexual and 'discipline' aka physical abuse that was either 'not spoken about' in the case of sexual predation, or in the case of discipline treated as 'normal'.

I was fortunate and wasn't directly affected. But I can remember strange men seen hanging around our school and hearing about other attempts at men making inappropriate contact. But never any explanation why.

Sure in the 1960's and 70's we left our house unlocked but now we have our minds unlocked and speak about the previously 'unspeakable' and that enables active prevention, gives kids a voice and acts to deny dysfunctional adults the opportunity to abuse under the cloak of silence. 

The reality was that for most of us in 1970 there was nothing portable in our houses worth stealing. A far cry from todays expensive consumer culture where even average households present an Aladdin's Cave of 'desirable' items tempting to opportunistic thieves.

Edited by - m06 on 02/18/2020 00:06:08

Feb 18, 2020 - 6:40:22 PM
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3186 posts since 7/8/2010

In 1953 I was six years old. My dad bought me a used 27 inch bike
To pedal I had to stand up off of the seat in order to reach the pedals. My first feel of absolute freedom and self assurance. In a couple of years I installed a gooseneck and risers. I was king of the road. That bike, a Rawlings baseball glove and my new twelve dollar Sears Silvertone guitar defined happiness and content for this child of the fifties.

Feb 19, 2020 - 4:43:44 AM

3339 posts since 12/6/2009

first thing is women have to know proper terminology....example;.... U bend..= P trap...minor stuff like that so the men down at the plumbing supply dont give you the wrong part.

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