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Fish and chips - a question for Brits mostly, but all welcome to contribute

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Feb 18, 2020 - 1:35:48 PM
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71361 posts since 5/9/2007

quote:
Originally posted by Wet Spaniel
quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

Many of our quarrymen came here from Yorkshire in the early 1900s.
They brought with them a change in the Maine accent and what we now eat.


I can only apologise about the slop you must have to eat now due to it's English origins Steve.


My Grandmother came here as a child from Yorkshire and she was hired to cook for a certain family here for many years.

My mom was a great cook,but a lot of what she learned as to perfect biscuits came from her mother-in-law whose Mom was a local Indian,raised on an island,here.

We were blessed with good cooking.

Feb 19, 2020 - 1:04:21 AM

m06

England

8477 posts since 10/5/2006

What about dessert? The sweet food. And cakes.

That’s a whole ‘nother huge chapter of the home kitchen recipe book.

My mouth (and eyes) waters just thinking about the apple pie, foraged berry crumble, jam rolly-poly, fruit cake, scones, Easter biscuits, cherry tart, lemon meringue pie, home-made toffee (on Guy Fawkes night), spotted dick, gingerbread men, fairy cakes, and saffron loaf that my mum used to bake.

Many of those baking recipes went back generations in families. And regionality is as big a part of the sweet menu. What outsider would know that saffron cakes and buns are a Cornish speciality? Eccles cakes, Welsh cakes, Dundee cake, Bath buns - the list is as long (and ancient) as your arm. That all is a roots and identity aspect too.

And proper custard deserves it’s own chapter.

Edited by - m06 on 02/19/2020 01:17:46

Feb 19, 2020 - 4:03:14 AM
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Hawgfiddle65

Scotland

1197 posts since 9/15/2010

Hi

Local British breads too ,deserve a chapter. I grew up with the wonderful stotty cake. Perfect bread in my opinion , for sweet and savoury fillings . Stotty with home cooked ham and pease pudding, marvellous!!

Jim

Feb 19, 2020 - 5:59:09 AM

1301 posts since 4/22/2018

Ah Jim the penny has dropped where you originate from. I used to live in the north-east and have eaten plenty of Scotties in my time. Wonderful grub

Edited by - Wet Spaniel on 02/19/2020 06:00:00

Feb 19, 2020 - 9:31:34 AM

conic

England

726 posts since 2/15/2014

I once had square sausages from scotland, fitted just right on a sandwich

Feb 20, 2020 - 8:04:43 AM
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71361 posts since 5/9/2007

Pretty hard to ruin a good piece of fish.

Feb 20, 2020 - 8:39:27 AM
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14619 posts since 12/2/2005

quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

Pretty hard to ruin a good piece of fish.


Well, you're the retired fisherman, not me, but I kinda have to put on my retired chef's hat and disagree. I think it's EASY to ruin a good piece of fish. And the simplest way to do THAT is to overcook it.

Feb 20, 2020 - 8:48:49 AM

71361 posts since 5/9/2007

We cooked our Fish and Potatoes w/pork scraps on Monday,recooked it on Tuesday as Fish Hash. w/onion added and then the ketchup came out.
It seemed to take two cookings in as many days very well.

Feb 20, 2020 - 10:30:56 AM
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1301 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by eagleisland
quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

Pretty hard to ruin a good piece of fish.


Well, you're the retired fisherman, not me, but I kinda have to put on my retired chef's hat and disagree. I think it's EASY to ruin a good piece of fish. And the simplest way to do THAT is to overcook it.


I think Skip, that you'll find the easiest way to ruin a good piece of fish is to peel all the lovely batter off smiley

Feb 20, 2020 - 10:50:01 AM
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14619 posts since 12/2/2005

quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

We cooked our Fish and Potatoes w/pork scraps on Monday,recooked it on Tuesday as Fish Hash. w/onion added and then the ketchup came out.
It seemed to take two cookings in as many days very well.


In an application like that, I can see how you could work it. But say you were putting a six- to eight-ounce portion of cod or haddock on the plate instead. That can EASILY be overcooked.

Feb 20, 2020 - 10:55:53 AM

44 posts since 1/31/2020

Sounds to me like a snow flake ,who hates to batter batter , he probably tells the server no napkins, no cup , just serve to me directly on my hand....besides all that , it has to be fried with new oil, at the proper temp.not too hot not too cold. Goes without saying don't eat food like that more than once a month.otherwise you need a good cardiologist.

Feb 20, 2020 - 11:31:37 AM
Players Union Member

Brian T

Canada

16305 posts since 6/5/2008

Come fishing with us.
For shore lunch, you get a slice of bread with battered DF fresh fish on it.
Plates are a nuisance. Wash your hands in the lake.

Not too hot, not too cold? Can't hold the oil temp with a new piece of fish.
The trick is to have the battered fish pieces all swing through the same temperature curve.

I really wanted fish & chips for breakfast today. Experiment. Nobody ready to do it.

Feb 20, 2020 - 12:50:34 PM

71361 posts since 5/9/2007

quote:
Originally posted by eagleisland
quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

We cooked our Fish and Potatoes w/pork scraps on Monday,recooked it on Tuesday as Fish Hash. w/onion added and then the ketchup came out.
It seemed to take two cookings in as many days very well.


In an application like that, I can see how you could work it. But say you were putting a six- to eight-ounce portion of cod or haddock on the plate instead. That can EASILY be overcooked.


Very true,Skip.Overcooking fish or shrimp is a shame,especially as it's so good on the rare side of done.

Feb 20, 2020 - 1:22:25 PM

14619 posts since 12/2/2005

quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

Very true,Skip.Overcooking fish or shrimp is a shame,especially as it's so good on the rare side of done.


For me, that depends on the species. I adore sushi, so as you can guess I'm not averse to eating many species raw. That includes salmon; if I'm having it cooked, I like it just as you say. Tuna, too - if cooked, a sear on both sides is about as much heat as I want to apply to it; barely warm or even cool in the middle is just fine with me.

But there are some species I absolutely want cooked through, owing to having prepped many and many a fish in restaurant kitchens. There's no hard and fast, but I'm more likely to be skeptical of demersal species (groundfish) than pelagic ones (those swimming higher in the water column). There are exceptions, of course - swordfish is pelagic, and I want that cooked through, and fluke and halibut are demersal, and I'll happily eat those raw (the fin meat off a fluke is a particular delicacy!).

It's the fish that I've frequently seen with worms in them that I won't eat below cooked through, such as Atlantic cod or haddock. My caution may be over the top; after all, the odds that a worm that lives in a fish in 50 degree water might not exactly find the warmth of a human gut an appealing environment. But I'm not eager to take a chance.

Now, getting that fish JUST cooked through without drying it out... that's where some skill is useful!

Edited by - eagleisland on 02/20/2020 13:24:38

Feb 20, 2020 - 1:26:45 PM

213 posts since 4/11/2019

What about that old recipie for gar fish??

And look, THIS thread is up to 5 pages already!!

Giving Joan of Arc and the Dancing Wu Li Masters a run for the money!!

Feb 20, 2020 - 1:31:29 PM
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71361 posts since 5/9/2007

Any cod I've ever caught in a lobster trap(many dozens) have all been riddled with worms to the point where candling is pointless.

Feb 20, 2020 - 1:31:44 PM
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213 posts since 4/11/2019

Old Floridian Gar fish recipie:

Take a fresh caught gar fish, remove the innards but leave the scales (scutes) on.

Stuff the insides with as much cow manure as will fit.

Set the fish out on a log in the sun for a few days.

Serve the cow manure and discard the fish.

Feb 20, 2020 - 1:36:59 PM

71361 posts since 5/9/2007

Raw codfish split with a minor salting,hung on a clothesline for three straight days of sun and westerlies and consumed while it still has some flesh moisture.
Five days is considered overcooked.

Feb 20, 2020 - 1:50:36 PM
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14619 posts since 12/2/2005

quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

Raw codfish split with a minor salting,hung on a clothesline for three straight days of sun and westerlies and consumed while it still has some flesh moisture.
Five days is considered overcooked.


Hmmm... that would kill the wee beasties, for certain.

That sounds worth trying to me!

Feb 20, 2020 - 2:24:53 PM

conic

England

726 posts since 2/15/2014

quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

Any cod I've ever caught in a lobster trap(many dozens) have all been riddled with worms to the point where candling is pointless.


Interesting Steve, why are they  riddled with worms ?

Feb 20, 2020 - 4:12:03 PM

71361 posts since 5/9/2007

I always wondered that too,conic.
I've seen as many or more perfectly clean 12-14" flounder in the same traps.
I throw those whole into a skillet and pull the meat from the bones on the plate.

Feb 20, 2020 - 4:12:11 PM
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1301 posts since 4/22/2018

quote:
Originally posted by Easkey

Sounds to me like a snow flake ,who hates to batter batter , he probably tells the server no napkins, no cup , just serve to me directly on my hand....besides all that , it has to be fried with new oil, at the proper temp.not too hot not too cold. Goes without saying don't eat food like that more than once a month.otherwise you need a good cardiologist.


What an unimaginative response. 

Feb 20, 2020 - 4:21:12 PM

71361 posts since 5/9/2007

quote:
Originally posted by eagleisland
quote:
Originally posted by steve davis

Raw codfish split with a minor salting,hung on a clothesline for three straight days of sun and westerlies and consumed while it still has some flesh moisture.
Five days is considered overcooked.


Hmmm... that would kill the wee beasties, for certain.

That sounds worth trying to me!


I shouldn't call 5 days overcooked,necessarily.I just like to get to them before they get too leathery.

Steamed or boiled with potato works good with dried cod.For snacking peel off strips with your favorite jacknife.

Feb 20, 2020 - 4:46:17 PM

44 posts since 1/31/2020

The cod even when caught fresh can have worms under the skin.if u catch them in a pot in deep water have a worm we call "drankages" inside the flesh.

Feb 20, 2020 - 4:51:27 PM

71361 posts since 5/9/2007

Worms in the filets show up when lit from behind.

Edited by - steve davis on 02/20/2020 16:52:12

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